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17

I am at the moment working on a project that, among other things, controls the computer fans. Basically, the fans are controlled by the superIO chip of your computer. We access the chip directly using port-mapped IO, and from there we can get to the logical fan device. Using port-mapped IO requires the code to run in kernel mode, but windows does not supply ...


17

Try using IOKit and the IOPowerSources functions. You can use IOPSCopyPowerSourcesInfo() to get a blob, and IOPSCopyPowerSourcesList() to then extract a CFArray out of that, listing the power sources. Finally you can use the IOPSGetPowerSourceDescription() to grab the dictionary. If you can use the command line, you can use the pmset command Like so: $ ...


10

I would hope that you can't do this. I've run into situations a number of times where I couldn't reboot the computer in any other way. In such cases, do you really want to force a laptop user to unplug the power supply and remove the battery while running? Having given that warning, you may be writing software for rather different situations where it makes ...


9

Got the below post from a site. Any body tried this? Nothing in the framework, so you'll have to "PInvoke" a bit. The API's you need to call are CreateWaitableTimer and SetWaitableTimer. Following is a complete (Q&D) sample that illustrates how you can set a system to be awoken from sleep/hibernate using above Win32 API's. Note that here I'm setting a ...


7

See page 62 of the ACPI spec in relation to the 4-second rule (http://www.acpi.info/DOWNLOADS/ACPIspec30b.pdf) Long and the short of it is that the logic is in hardware.


6

You can use waitable timers to wake from a suspend or hibernate state. From what I can find, it is not possible to programmatically wake from normal shut down mode (soft off/S5), in that case, you need to specify a WakeOnRTC alarm in BIOS. To use waitable timers from C#, you need pInvoke. The import declarations are: public delegate void ...


5

It is indeed a mechanical power off, so it will be kind of difficult to circumvent. If it's really important, you could disconnect the power button and turn the computer on/off with wake-on-lan resp. remote shutdown.


5

I have found a solution that works for me. First of all make sure to #include < linux/power_supply.h > Assuming you know the name of the battery, this code gives an example of how to get current battery capacity. char name[]= "BAT0"; int result = 0; struct power_supply *psy = power_supply_get_by_name(name); union power_supply_propval chargenow, ...


5

To find out where a call into the kernel ends up, Ftrace can be a handy tool. For your particular case, I used the following command to get a function graph for a read from /sys/power/state (I figured the reading function wouldn't be too far away from writing function that you are looking for): trace-cmd record -p function_graph -F cat /sys/power/state ...


5

Listen for them over D-Bus.


4

As far as I know, you are correct in saying that the OS is not even involved in this type of "shutdown". Holding the power button for a while is just a signal to the hardware to immediately turn off power to all devices within the computer. Normal shutdown/sleep/hibernate events can of course be caught and be handled using the WinAPI, as you state.


4

Use a pulser switch. I'm not sure if that is the right term but I have seen them in catalog(s). It's a snap action switch which only 'makes' for a split second as you press and not as you release it. Stopping in the middle doesn't work. Once you reach the threshold the mechanism start moving to close the contact and doesn't stop moving until the contact ...


3

Honestly it sounds like you haven't done ANY research at all. The first result in google returned a wikipedia page that answers your first question: "...the standard brings power management into operating system control (OSPM), as opposed to the previous BIOS central system, which relied on platform-specific firmware to determine power management and ...


3

This is not possible as this Power off occurs below the operating system level so it is like pulling the plug as far as the OS is concerned!


3

A machine that is hibernating cannot come out of sleep without pressing the power button, or sending a magic packet if the ethernet adaptor has Wake On Lan (WOL) capability and the motherboard supports that. WOL packets can only be generated on the local network, not remotely from other networks.


3

Unplug the power cable from the motherboard, and hardwire it to be on all the time. :)


3

Michal Kottman created a kernel module which allows you to execute such ACPI commands. It was designed for calling commands to toggle video cards, but can be used for other purposed as well. It's available from Github, installation instructions below: Install the kernel headers matching the current kernel Get the source and build it git clone ...


3

you may use ioreg on the command line as well. For example: ioreg -l -w0 |grep CurrentCapacity gives you the current battery status, which may be compared to the max capacity: ioreg -l -w0 |grep MaxCapacity


3

I just removed the wire for the power led from the motherboard... Not a nice solution, but the f***g led is not blinkg anymore.


2

Are you going nearer to develop the SkyNet ? Sorry for this question, but as lot of people has suggested, I too believe this shouldn't be made possible, if at all it is possible to design.


2

Every OS provides a set of APIs and notifications you can use and subscribe to appropriately. Windows, for example, sends a WM_POWERBROADCAST message to all windows before an power event happens. Read on it more in Power Management section at MSDN. However you want the power-aware features in a java application, which will require you to use some sort of a ...


2

I believe the only way you can change this is by changing manually the settings in your BIOS. This probably can't be caught by a programming language. If you realy need to, you could just unplug the tiny wire from your motherboard which goes to the power button.


2

The task scheduler program in Win7, taskschd.msc (and I beleive XP as well) can be set to wake the system on different triggers. Those triggers can be schedule, time, event, etc. In at least Win7, you need to set "Allow Wake Timers" to 'Enabled' for this to work. This setting is found under... --> Control Panel\Hardware and Sound\Power Options click - ...


2

Once you actually shut down your computer(not sleeping or hibernating) you can't wake it up from C#, C++ code directly. After all the OS itself is closed. The only chance would be for your motherboard to support some kind of timer mechanism. And with some C++ function to be able to write some flags into the BIOS and set that timer.


2

Essentially, there's some hardware on the system at those two locations (PM1a_SLP_TYP and PM1b_SLP_TYP). The 'mov' instructions specify the ports for the sleep function in the hardware, and the out dx, ax sends the instructions to the ports. Now you don't say here was the value of AX is. Odds are that value changes for the different sleep types. But, ...


2

I have to wonder why you need to do that, but you may need to write a program that uses the VT_* ioctl()s in console_ioctl(4).


2

Okay, so i found a solution that worked for me; a tool called AutoHotkey_L and a script made according to these threads on the AutoHotkey forums. This is the code I'm using, and I suggest reading up on AutoHotkey commands in the documentation. I'm tweaking the code as I learn what it's actually doing, but for now this works. :) #NoEnv #Persistent SendMode ...


2

To get started with Parse::RecDescent you may look at Pro Perl Parsing, Ch. 5 or at Advanced Perl Programming, Ch. 2 Xml Diff tools should be appropriate for comparing hierarchically structured data; perhaps you can apply such a tool to ASTs saved in XML format


2

To my knowledge, it is generally controlled by hardware, though this is not standardized. Hardware control is definitely the most simple, although that hardware could be a BMC or microcontroller that could be accessed from the host. Long story short though: no, I don't think you can modify it. That's my two cents, anyhow.



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