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16

You might try decorating the controller action you are posting to (and the one which throws this exception) with the [ValidateInput(false)] attribute (by leaving <httpRuntime requestValidationMode="2.0"/> in web.config).


14

I had the same problem. Here is an example of my solution: [ValidateInput(false)] public ActionResult *YourMethodName*(FormCollection forms) { // Encoded String string EncodedValue = Server.HtmlEncode(forms[*name or index*]); // Normal String string value = forms[*name or index*] //.... } ...


12

Take a look at the Identity Server (http://identityserver.codeplex.com) which uses the SQL Membership Provider. It's a custom STS, but it's robust, extensible, and well architected. Update: The project page is changed to http://thinktecture.github.io/Thinktecture.IdentityServer.v2/ Code has moved to ...


11

I had the same issue when running local. I was going through the How-To found here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj161104.aspx and would get the type not found error on that assembly. I double checked to make sure I pulled down the assembly via NuGet and even uninstalled and reinstalled it... no dice. It basically boiled down to a missing ...


9

IIRC, it is against Windows Live privacy policy to release the user's name or email address as claims (unlike Gmail or Yahoo!). As such, it is not possible to get those claims from Live (unless you happen to be Microsoft). The only value you can get is called a name identifier. It is unique per RP domain (i.e. it is not a single value per LiveID, but ...


8

For the part of the question about the registration stage, the best thing to use to identify users is the NameIdentifier claim type http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/ws/2005/05/identity/claims/nameidentifier. This should be unique for each identity provider and also fixed. If you use the email address claim, it could change for the same user. Technically it could ...


8

This is a total #FAIL on the part of Microsoft. The users, when logging into your site using Google or other providers, they have to accept first. Then they simply pass the basic information to the site, the site uses it, and everyone is happy. BTW you can get it from the user with behind-the-scenes code pages but it's not seamless for the user, requires a ...


6

I wrote a small blog note on this here: http://erikbra.wordpress.com/2012/04/17/wif-saml-token-post-and-requestvalidationmode2-0/. It isn't necessary to turn off request validation, or set it to 2.0 for your entire site. In short, you only need to alter the requestValidationMode to 2.0 mode on the specific URL that WIF posts back the SAML token to. This can ...


6

There is one thing you should be aware of, when working with ACS (and with Claims in general) - you shall get to know the Claims. Now, to the ACS specific question. Windows Azure Access Control service is not the magic wand that will do what you desire automatically. ACS is the easiest way to get working with Claims, and to work with only one set of ...


6

Make sure project type is set to .NET Framework 4.5 and not 4 else 'Identity and Access' wont show. Also ensure the project type is not set to .NET Framework 4.5.1 as that doesn't work either.


5

After investigating sources over at apple.com and google, I must conclude that this is not possible now. Hopefully, Apple will become and OpenID provider soon.


5

The short answer is generally "yes", but of course there's a longer answer :-). Does it make sense to store user information (other than the nameidentifier) in ACS vs local database tables? Yes it could make sense. But for optimization purposes you might keep a copy of some of the user profile information somewhere else (local to the app). ACS rules ...


5

The token, which I sent to the server, had the wrong format. The above token is in a json format and contains a 'securityToken', which is encoded xml. With HttpUtility.UrlDecode and XMLReader it is possible to retrieve the base64 string. The base64 string of the above token is: ...


5

Why do you subscribe to the SignedIn event each time the PostAuthenticateRequest event is raised? You can simple subscribe to it when the application starts (in the Global.asax) and it will be raised for each user that signed in: public class MvcApplication : System.Web.HttpApplication { ... protected void Application_Start() { ... ...


5

You shouldn't use ACS as an identity provider. Occasionally I see some confusion as to what role ACS serves. ACS at is core is a federation provider, but there is a valid scenario in which you want your backend service (a trusted subsystem) authenticating directly to ACS using a shared secret or a certificate. This can be done using Service Identities. ...


5

From your front-end app, you could certainly pass along the identity data of the end user by either sending the token as is or sending the attributes from it. Both have issues. For the former, if it's also encrypted, the front- and back-ends will have to share the private key needed to decrypt it; they will also have to share audience restrictions, etc. in ...


5

Yes this is possible, have a look here: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/vbertocci/archive/2012/11/07/provisioning-a-directory-tenant-as-an-identity-provider-in-an-acs-namespace.aspx


5

Take a look at the ACS Management Service API which has ServiceIdentity management. The management endpoint is located here: https://NAMESPACE.accesscontrol.windows.net/v2/mgmt/service You can leverage this ACS Management service to create new ServiceIdentities string name = "SampleServiceIdentity"; string password = "SampleServiceIdentityPassword"; ...


5

I too have gone through similar pain in recent past. I was a complete newbie with this and had quite a hard time understanding all this. I found Pluralsight Courses from Dominick Baier quite useful in understanding these concepts. Now coming to your questions. I have got an MVC controller action, I want to tell users here are the Identity Providers ...


5

You specify the key which will be used for message exchange. When you configure Azure ACS in the management portal, you specify private key which will be used to sign tokens(Certificates and Keys tab). When you configure web application to use Azure ACS, reference to the certificate to validate signature is added to web.config: <issuerNameRegistry ...


5

Encountered the same problem. Was always returned back to "Configure Authentication". So I tried creating a new user in Azure Active Directory and made it a global administrator with the type New user in your organization. I tried the new user account and it worked. Hope this helps you also.


4

The certificate you are referring to is the token signing cert used by ACS. You need a cert deployed in your web role so WIF can use it to encrypt the cookies (nothing to do with the token). You will have to add a cert in your Windows Azure deployment. (Service Configuration). See sample #5 in http://claimsid.codeplex.com If this is a proof of concept and ...


4

Your server side code looks fine, but Sixto is right about standard channel factories. Luckily, you can request a security token from ACS yourself using a WSTrustChannelFactory. In the context of your sample, your code would look like this: // // Get the token from ACS // WSTrustChannelFactory trustChannelFactory = new WSTrustChannelFactory( ...


4

This seems reasonable. Note that nameidentifier is IdP specific, meaning it is supplied by the identity provider you authenticated with (e.g. LiveID, Google, etc). ACS is simply copying this value into a claim. Check with each one of those providers to see what guarantees they make. My assumption is that they should not change for a "returning user" -> ...


4

Since you are mentioning of FormCollection I assume you are programming in windows with .Net. Then the easiest thing would be using WIF (http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/security/aa570351). This way you don't have to parse the token, validate it, set the User Identity, and then create a cookie representing the information from the token. WIF, once you ...


4

This took a bit of work but we finally solved the problem. Instead of configuring this, we built the connection in code. I'm thinking we probably had an error somewhere in the client configuration. Some advice to anyone trying this - build the connections in code first. The XML configuration is a bit harder to work with. We found some sample code on ...


4

You can't ask Azure to return more claims. What you can do is to use the claim value of "http://www.facebook.com/claims/AccessToken" which is one of the 6 claims from Azure. Then send this accesstoken to facebook to get the other user permissions from Facebook. You can easily do this by using this tool: http://csharpsdk.org/


4

To remove that xml line from the web config, I made my own WSFederationAuthenticationModule overriding the old one, like so: public class CustomWSFederationAuthenticationModule : WSFederationAuthenticationModule { protected override void InitializePropertiesFromConfiguration(string serviceName) { this.Realm = "http://localhost:81/"; ...


4

but I don't understand how ACS works well enough to know if this is supported. It is supported. ASP.NET Web API allows us to build REST services. ACS supports any kinds of REST services. The usual claim validation process described on http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windowsazure/hh289317.aspx will work. We just need to change WCF to Web ...


4

Even though you can use Windows Live as identity provider in ACS, there are some cases where you would not want to use it. The user ID you receive depends on the ACS namespace. This means that if your application uses multiple ACS namepaces (lets say one for europe and one for USA) this might cause some issues. Imagine the scenario where your user logs in ...



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