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119

Check out this article and this simple example. Quick translation of same to your classes ... var d1 = typeof(Task<>); Type[] typeArgs = { typeof(Item) }; var makeme = d1.MakeGenericType(typeArgs); object o = Activator.CreateInstance(makeme); Per your edit: For that case, you can do this ... var d1 = Type.GetType("GenericTest.TaskA`1"); // ...


50

When using reflection you should ask yourself a couple of questions first, because you may end up in an over-the-top complex solution that's hard to maintain: Is there a way to solve the problem using genericity or class/interface inheritance? Can I solve the problem using dynamic invocations (only .NET 4.0 and above)? Is performance important, i.e. will ...


26

As always, the only correct way to answer a question about performance is to actually measure the code. Here's a sample LINQPad program that tests: Activator.CreateInstance new T() calling a delegate that calls new T() As always, take the performance program with a grain of salt, there might be bugs here that skews the results. The output (timing ...


23

Keep in mind that the string class is immutable. It cannot be changed after it is created. That explains why it doesn't have a parameterless constructor, it could never generate a useful string object other than an empty string. That's already available in the C# language, it is "". Same reasoning applies for a string(String) constructor. There is no ...


15

I suggest you give your factory implementation a method RegisterImplementation. So every new class is just a call to that method and you are not changing your factories code. UPDATE: What I mean is something like this: Create an interface that defines a calculation. According to your code, you already did this. For the sake of being complete, I am going to ...


15

I did some benchmarking between these (I would write down the bare minimum details): public static T Instance() //~1800 ms { return new T(); } public static T Instance() //~1800 ms { return new Activator.CreateInstance<T>(); } public static readonly Func<T> Instance = () => new T(); //~1800 ms public static readonly Func<T> ...


13

I hat the same problems with a library of mine providing "plugin"-functionality... I got it finally working... Here was my problem: I had one main assembly using plugins, one assembly with the plugin (Plugin.dll) AND (important) another assembly providing the plugin-functionality (Library.dll). The Plugin.dll referenced the main assembly (in order to be ...


12

Well, there's the risk that your code is weakly typed, and you won't find out that you've accidentally tried to use it with a type which doesn't have a public parameterless constructor until execution time... and it's going to perform a bit worse than a direct constructor call. Other than that, it should be okay. If you can design around it to use strongly ...


12

You do not need the Activator to call the method. You use MethodInfo.Invoke directly. The first parameter can be left null.


11

The cast operator is of lower precedence than the member access operator. (A)B.C(); is parsed as (A)(B.C()); which is not a legal statement. You ought to write ((A)B).C(); if you mean to cast B to A and then call C() on type A. For your future reference, the precedence table is here: ...


10

GvS is correct - here is an example of the usage: using System; using System.Reflection; class Program { static void Main() { Type type = Type.GetType("Foo"); MethodInfo info = type.GetMethod("Bar"); Console.WriteLine(info.Invoke(null, null)); } } static class Foo { public static String Bar() { return "Bar"; } }


10

You need to cast the returned object to Foo type. It doesn't make sense to cast it to a type defined in a variable. It should be known by the compiler, as the whole point of casting through the inheritance hierarchy is satisfying compiler's static type checking. return (Foo)System.Activator.CreateInstance(t); There's a generic version, ...


10

Yes, this is true. Edit 2: Here's a good explanation of the how and why. http://www.simple-talk.com/community/blogs/simonc/archive/2010/11/17/95700.aspx For verification I compiled the following method: public static T Create<T>() where T: new() { return new T(); } And this is the generated IL when compiled with the C# compiler in .NET 3.5 ...


8

If you want to convert an arbitrary string to the underlying type of the Nullable, you can use the Convert class: var propertyInfo = typeof(Foo).GetProperty("Bar"); object convertedValue = null; try { convertedValue = System.Convert.ChangeType("1256", Nullable.GetUnderlyingType(propertyInfo.PropertyType)); } catch (InvalidCastException) { ...


8

I think you are dealing with a Type mismatch. Likely the assembly is referenced in different places, or they are compiled against different versions. I suggest you iterate through the ConstructorInfo's and do a paramtype == typeof(DelayComposite) on the appropriate parameter.


7

Try this one: Type contextType = Type.GetType("CheckoutProcesses." + data.Case.ToString()); CheckoutContext output = (CheckoutContext)Activator.CreateInstance(contextType, data); The reason you code doesn't work is that Activator.CreateInstance doesn't really have the overload you want. So you might wonder why the code compiles at all! The ...


7

You're looking for Marshal.GetActiveObject. object word; try { word = System.Runtime.InteropServices.Marshal.GetActiveObject("Word.Application"); } catch (COMException) { Type type = Type.GetTypeFromProgID("Word.Application"); word = System.Activator.CreateInstance(type); }


7

It depends on your use case. If you need very high performance and are creating many objects then using Activator.CreateInstance may be a problem. But in most cases it will be fast enough and it is a very powerful method of creating objects. In fact, most IoC Containers/Service locators/whatever you call them use this method to create an object of the ...


7

What you are trying to do: Assembly assembly = Assembly.Load(DLLByteArray); Type typeToExecute = assembly.GetTypes()[0]; typeToExecute.GetMethod("TheMethod").Invoke(null, theArguments); That will invoke a static method with an object[] (theArguments) containing all method arguments The other solution is simply to remove the static keyword from the class ...


7

It sounds like typeOfSomeTClass or typeOfSomeCClass is a type that doesn't have a public parameterless constructor, as required by: this.t = Activator.CreateInstance<T>(); this.c = Activator.CreateInstance<C>(); You could enforce that via a constraint: where T : SomeTClass, new() where C : SomeCClass, new() in which case you can also then ...


7

Since the actual type T is available to you only through reflection, you would need to access methods of Store<T> through reflection as well: Type constructedType = classType.MakeGenericType(typeParams); object x = Activator.CreateInstance(constructedType, new object[] { someParameter }); var method = constructedType.GetMethod("MyMethodTakingT"); var ...


7

You need to specify the BindingFlags for reflection to find it: (T)Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(T), BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.NonPublic, null new object[] { barProperty }, null); Now, in this case you do need to build an object[] because it's not a params. As Matthew Watson stated, I should clarify the way reflection works. ...


6

The most likely cause here is that IFrameworkClient is from a different assembly in the two cases, and is thus a different .NET type. Even if it is the same code, it can be a different type. Check the AssemblyQualifiedName. Note also that if you are loading this assembly with reflection you can get a different type even with the same AssemblyQualifiedName, ...


6

If it's a nullable int, you'll need to use an int parameter, not a string. property.SetValue(klass,1256,null); Note the change to klass, instead of class, as class is a reserved keyword. You could also use @class if absolutely necessary (quoting it). If your property is a generic, then I think you'll probably need to use Convert to convert whatever you ...


6

I would think that your call would need to be: var designer = Activator.CreateInstance(designerAttribute.Designer, new object[] { new DelayComposite(4) }); Unless, of course, it is that, in which case the answer is not immediately obvious.


6

If you'll notice my comment to your question it will be evident that I'm not rightly sure exactly how you want or need to go about this, but until we have a more elaborate description I can only offer you this in the hope it fits well to your situation (the key is in 'searching' the assemblies): var className = "System.Boolean"; var assemblyName = ...


6

One strategy that I use in cases like this is to flag my various implementations with a special attribute to indicate its key, and scan the active assemblies for types with that key: [AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Class)] public class OperationAttribute : System.Attribute { public OperationAttribute(string opKey) { _opKey = opKey; } ...


6

This might help: Don’t use Activator.CreateInstance or ConstructorInfo.Invoke, use compiled lambda expressions


6

Why don't you just use what MSDN recommends, which is the following: internal static T GetInstance<T>() where T:new() { return new T(); } http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/0hcyx2kd.aspx EDIT: Though, I don't understand why you even want to have this method? Instead of calling var x = GetInstance<Foo>();, you could just do var x = ...


6

There are at least two causes for this: The overhead of calling Type<Test>.New() or System.Activator.CreateInstance<Test>() for the first time is relatively large. Because of this, I changed 100000 to 10000000. Build your application in release mode, run it without a debugger. With those two changes, the two methods take about equally long. ...



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