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4

timestamps are only created with generating models. here's an example from the guide. http://guides.rubyonrails.org/migrations.html $ bin/rails generate migration CreateProducts name:string part_number:string generates class CreateProducts < ActiveRecord::Migration def change create_table :products do |t| t.string :name t.string ...


3

Why don't you just use each_with_index method? <% @members.each_with_index do |member, index| %> <%= index %> <%= member.name %> <% end %> If you need only 10 records, limit @members at the controller: @members = Member.where(column: params[:column]).limit(10) Does this help you?


3

In order to filter on users table, you need to include it in the join. Try: Appointment.joins([customer: :user]).where("users.email ILIKE test") This will create a join between appointments and customers and customers and users allowing you to filter on users table columns.


2

Fix is <% (0..10).each do |idx| %> <%= idx %>: <%= @members[idx].name %> <% end %> You forgot to use @. It should be @members, not members. And, if your query to the controller returns less than 10, then your looping way will crash. You will get the error,NoMethodError like NoMethodError: undefined method name' for ...


2

One way would be using GROUP_CONCAT which, to quote the docs, "returns a string result with the concatenated non-NULL values from a group." It would go something like this: @cars = Car.group(:manufacturer) .select("id, manufacturer, COUNT(id) AS total_count, GROUP_CONCAT(id) AS car_ids") @cars.first.car_ids # => "1,2,5,9" ...


2

You could use reorder method to reset the original order and add your new order by column. reorder(*args) Replaces any existing order defined on the relation with the specified order. User.order('email DESC').reorder('id ASC') # generated SQL has 'ORDER BY id ASC' Subsequent calls to order on the same relation will be appended. For example: ...


2

I think, you need to have a method in Book class, def attributes_with_following_flag(user) as_json.merge({is_following: user.is_following(this)}) end And in controller, render json: @books.collect{|b| b.attributes_with_following_flag(current_user)}


2

The solution you mention is still valid, you just need to change the conditions part to adopt the new Rails 4 convention (see similar question here): class User < ActiveRecord::Base has_many :user_countries has_many :event_countries, -> { where(user_countries: {:event => true}) }, :through => :user_countries, :source => ...


2

In general, dynamic find_by methods are out of favor and Model.find_by(uuid: '123') are preferred. But in your case, it sounds like you could override the primary key like so. class Model self.primary_key = 'uuid' end This would allow you to do Model.find('1234-1234-1234-1234') I still don't think this will work for find_by_id, since that is ...


1

You want to place your search conditions in your LEFT JOIN ... ON clause. Mentioning in your WHERE clause a column belonging to the right-side table in a LEFT JOIN converts it to INNER JOIN. Try this: 'left join users on numbers.number = users.phone_number AND users.phone_number IS NULL' gets your missing-phone-number criterion. I'm not sure I ...


1

Have a look at http://guides.rubyonrails.org/association_basics.html and search for has_many. You need an extra model which stores the images and which has an other_model_id attribute which points to the other model. If you have never worked with has_many you'll find an example application at ...


1

Single Table Inheritance basically means that all subclasses of User are sharing a single database table, in your case users. Since you need to store the data in the database, you need to add additional columns to your users table. You can find more information on STI in the Rails documentation.


1

If you have to save several images related to a model, you'll need an 1 - N relation. So you have two choices: Create a model like album and make an 1 - 1 relationship Use an has_many (1-N) relationship. To learn more about associations I really recommend you to read the official guide.


1

I think what you need is: bars.select { |bar| bar.name == 'the name I want' } This uses Enumerable's select API to select elements from a collection which match a query.


1

If you look at the GemFile.lock of this project, you can see that you are using ActiveRecord with Mongoid. Even if you use other gem that don't need ActiveRecord, you shouldn't care, if you are using you should have a valid reason to do it.


1

Not sure what NoSQL service you are looking into, but we have used MongoDB in concert with Postgres for a while now. Helpful hint, they say you need to get rid of ActiveRecord, but in reality, you don't. Most just say that because you end up not setting up your database.yml and/or running rake commands to setup AR DB. Remember also that Postgres has ...


1

If I understand your problem correctly, to speed up the things, you can get all the bars, and put them in the memory, in a hash that maps each (bar.name) to an array of bars. for example: bars_hash = Bar.all.group_by(&:name) Then, bars_hash[name] will return all the bars that match the name, or nil if none. With this, you will avoid doing a ...


1

Find the user with the given name and then use the association to create a book with the found user_id user = User.where(:name => "Sarah").first user.books.create(:title => "Wolves of the Calla")


1

As explained in the Association Basics Guide, you'd need something like this: createdBook = @user.books.create(title: "Wolves of the Calla")


1

Try going with either (assuming your date is a valid DateTime object) @posts = Post.where(["created_at < ?", date]) or @posts = Post.where { updated_at < date }


1

class User < ActiveRecord::Base has_many :images accepts_nested_attributes_for :images end class Image < ActiveRecord::Base belongs_to :user #use paper clip for the following method has_attached_file :attachment end Now upload the images using your WYSIWYG editor, and append nested images form to the user form, submit the form and you are ...


1

Did I get it correctly that you want to create multiple WorkloadRoutine objects, one for each exercise with the corresponding repetitions, the position, etc. If yes, then in order to do that you will have to pass an array of hashes (one hash for each object) to the WorkoutRoutine.create() function. As engineersmnky correctly stated in his comment, the data ...


1

The problem is in your where clause. You are referencing city.id when it should be cities.id as the table name is city. An even nicer way of writing it would be to use the hash syntax Company.includes(:cities).where(cities: { id: params[:city_id] }).references(:cities)


1

It sounds like you're trying to do the following: Include all posts that are 'sticky' Include all posts that have been created in the last day Order those posts from newest to oldest (do you want sticky posts to be ordered first?) In that case what you really want is an 'or' condition in your where clause. Something like scope :to_show, -> { ...


1

It comes from the squeel gem that extends AR. See the Query DSL.


1

You probably want <%= image_tag "https://s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/blog/img/#{p.id}-sm.png", alt: p.name %> Notice the use of double quotes (").


1

If you happen to be using Postgres with your app, then you can easily take advantage of PG's Full Text Search capabilities using the pg_search gem. You can also plug into frameworks like Solr or ElasticSearch to give you this functionality, but they will increase you development effort. PG and MySQL both also have pattern matching functions that would ...


1

There are several different, interrelated things going on here. Exactly how you carry out the changes depends on how you manage changes to your database structure. The most common way is to use Rails migrations, but your linked question suggests you're not doing that. So I'll speak mostly in SQL, and you can adapt that to your method. Use a sargable WHERE ...


1

Maybe try update_attribute ie instead of self.update(score: compute_score) try: self.update_attribute(:score, compute_score) The difference is update_attribute skips all validation and I assume that's where getter is called.


1

You can (and probably should) do this in the database but COALESCE is not what you're looking for. COALESCE is used to convert NULLs to something else in SQL, you say things like: coalesce(might_be_null, what_i_want_instead_of_null) In your case, you should always have both created_at and updated_at so you shouldn't have to worry about NULLs. If you want ...



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