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24

Well, why not using both ;) ?? I am using (literally in C# ... lol) EMGUCV.NET (which is an OpenCV C# wrapper) and AFORGE.NET at the same time: AFORGE.NET plus its "Image Processing Lab" makes much sense for filtering options (edge detection, thresholds, and so forth) and easing viewing functionalities. OpenCV provides all the rest like SIFT/SURF and ...


10

I find it helps to think of these problems as a landscape, where you're trying to find the lowest point. Methods like genetic algorithms are used when the landscape is too large to just test all the points, and the "shape" of the landscape is such that methods like gradient-descent will get you stuck in local minima. One good example is Rastrigin's ...


10

I am using OpenCV for a project in school right now, and I browsed the documentation for AForge and their feature seem to differ. AForge has lots of filters and is probably excellent for different transforms and image manipulation. But it seems to lack quite a bit in other areas. I could not find any matrix operations which was a disappointment as it is so ...


10

The question you need to ask yourself is which is more important - your time or the computer's time. If your task is really simple, you may be able to code it up in MATLAB and have it work right off the bat. MATLAB is by far the easiest for development - a scripted language with built-in memory management, a huge array of provided functions, and a great ...


9

Well, you can always use the GDI+ method. Bitmap b = new Bitmap( "some path" ); Color x = b.GetPixel( x, y ); However, GetPixel is actually pretty slow. Try it that way first, but if you need to scan many relatively large images it may not work for you. In that case, use LockBits to get a pointer to a contiguous memory chunk. You can then loop through ...


8

You can find the answer in this article. To summarize it, this method should do the trick: Bitmap ImageToBitmap(ColorImageFrame Image) { byte[] pixeldata = new byte[Image.PixelDataLength]; Image.CopyPixelDataTo(pixeldata); Bitmap bmap = new Bitmap(Image.Width, Image.Height, PixelFormat.Format32bppRgb); BitmapData bmapdata = ...


7

Not a VB buff, but I don't think that how you subscribe to events in VB. Try: Dim stream As New MJPEGStream("...") AddHandler stream.NewFrame, AddressOf Me.video_NewFrame ...


6

Edit1: for a detailed explanation view my blogpost on the same topic. I think I found the solution to the problem. It was just the asynchronous running of the UI elements that I desired to have and was hence getting the error. I corrected the error using the dispatcher as follows: void Cam_NewFrame(object sender, NewFrameEventArgs eventArgs) { ...


6

Use AForge.NET framework Grayscale filter The filter accepts 24, 32, 48 and 64 bpp color images and produces 8 (if source is 24 or 32 bpp image) or 16 (if source is 48 or 64 bpp image) bpp grayscale image. Then apply threshold filter.


6

Surprisingly, many quite simple autofocus algorithms actually performed quite well on this problem. I implemented 11 of the 16 algorithms outlined in the paper Dynamic evaluation of autofocusing for automated microscopic analysis of blood smear and pap smear by Liu, Wang & Sun. Since I had trouble finding recommendations for setting the threshold values, ...


5

It ain't easy. Why? Because of the No Free Lunch theorem. This basically states that there is no general search algorithm that works well for all problems. The best you can do is tailor the search for a specific problem space. You'll have to manually tweak your parameters to fit your solution. Sorry. Using a GA to find GA parameters gets ...


5

After some more thorough research I've found the answer by myself. If anyone else is searching for this you can try the following; VideoCaptureDevice Cam1; FilterInfoCollection VideoCaptureDevices; VideoCaptureDevices = new FilterInfoCollection(FilterCategory.VideoInputDevice); Cam1 = new VideoCaptureDevice(VideoCaptureDevices[0].MonikerString); ...


5

Use the Threshold Class to convert the image to black and white. // create filter Threshold filter = new Threshold( 100 ); // apply the filter filter.ApplyInPlace( image ); Details of the Threshold Class can be found at Aforge. The filter does image binarization using specified threshold value. All pixels with intensities equal or higher than threshold ...


5

You should fill the real part of each Complex value with your sample data, i.e. using LINQ: complexSamples = samples.Select(sample => new Complex((double)sample, 0.0)).ToArray(); After having performed the DFT your complexSamples will contain non-zero imaginary components (Im non-zero). It then depends on what your subsequent actions are whether or not ...


4

It may be a bit simplistic for your needs, but I've had good results with a simple algorithm that looks at the difference to neighbouring pixels. The sum of the difference of pixels 2-away seems to be a reasonable measure of image contrast. I couldn't find the original paper by Brenner in the 70's but it is mentioned in ...


4

In addition to Ed Swangren´s answer with LockBits you can avoid pointers all together. If you are using the WPF (or have access to) you can do something like this: var bitmap = new BitmapImage(uri); //Pixel array byte[] pixels = new byte[width * height * 4]; //account for stride if necessary bitmap.CopyPixels(..size, pixels, fullStride, 0); And now you ...


4

Easiest way: public static Bitmap MakeGrayscale(Bitmap original) { //make an empty bitmap the same size as original Bitmap newBitmap = new Bitmap(original.Width, original.Height); for (int i = 0; i < original.Width; i++) { for (int j = 0; j < original.Height; j++) { //get the pixel from the original image ...


4

I whipped up a quick (and admittedly rough) manual solution that demonstrates how to do this using locked bitmaps. It should be considerably faster than the alternative methods, but does involve a lot more code. Bitmap bmp = new Bitmap(@"C:\original.jpg"); Rectangle rect = new Rectangle(0, 0, bmp.Width, bmp.Height); BitmapData ...


4

I think the problem is that you do not make a copy of the passed bitmap (frame) in your event handler. The AForge documentation says: Since video source may have multiple clients, each client is responsible for making a copy (cloning) of the passed video frame, because the video source disposes its own original copy after notifying of clients. ...


4

I'm not that familiar with C#, but it seems as if cImage.Data returns a 2D array of Complex objects. These objects each have public fields (see http://www.aforgenet.com/framework/docs/html/09bb06de-f1c8-fc26-3472-78a64c4f4ac6.htm) containing the real (Re field) and imaginary (Im field) parts. So, I'd imagine: double realPart = realImaginaryData[0,0].Re; ...


4

One approach for semi-automatically removing the black pixel areas around the number plate could be to apply the PointedColorFloodFill filter four times, placing the flood fill starting points in the four corners of your image. Here is some example code where I have applied the filter on a copy of the number plate image from your question above (cropped to ...


4

You need to reference AForge.video AForge.video.VFW If your camera provides an MJPEGstream then ( sorry it’s in VB ) Imports AForge.Video Imports AForge.Video.VFW '… Dim VideoStream As MJPEGStream = New MJPEGStream("<your MJPEG URL>") Dim VFWriter = New AVIWriter(("your compression codec 4CC ex:xvid>")) VFWriter.FrameRate = <framerate> ...


4

I use always using You are not. Unfortunately you also use it when you should not. There are three bitmap objects being 'leaked' here for every frame. You got in trouble by using using on the MemoryStream. And patched the problem by copying the bitmap, but the bitmap object is not being disposed. Fix this the right way, do not dispose the ...


4

I propose a different algorithm approach, after working almost a year with image processing algorithms what I can tell is that to create an efficient algorithm, you have to "reflect" how you, as a human would do that, here is the proposed approach: We don't really care about the textures, we care about the edges (rectangles are edges), therefore we will ...


3

For the robot if you don't have prior knowledge and know-how I'd recommend to buy a premade solution such as the Roomba. The Roomba (certain models) comes with a hacking kit that will allow you to program it. Plus it will clean your floor when you are bored. Also for the vision part, OpenCV is a good start. Be warned that its not and "easy" project you ...


3

If anyone is interested, this is the way I did it. Blobsprocessing: using System; using System.Collections.Generic; using System.Linq; using System.Text; using System.Drawing; using System.Drawing.Imaging; using AForge; using AForge.Imaging; using AForge.Imaging.Filters; using AForge.Imaging.Textures; using AForge.Math.Geometry; namespace CDIO.Library { ...


3

Here is an article by the author of AForge.NET, although it is not about gesture detection


3

There really isn't an automatic way to do it for a given dataset. If there were, they wouldn't expose those parameters. Using a second GA to tune the parameters of the first GA is perilous -- do you use a third GA to tune the parameters of the second? Even if you did that, it's a recipe for overfitting anyway. My advice would be to play with the ...


3

The one time I programmed a genetic algorithm I included those values in the values to mutate, basically like you said using a GA to configure itself. It worked surprisingly well, especially since I've found it to be beneficial for those values to change over the course of it's computation.


3

I think you only need to rescale your color values using integer part or any other chopping function. Example in Mathematica:



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