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0

This is just like the usual head function for Vec. head' : ∀ {α} {A : Set α} → ∃ (λ n → Vec A (suc n)) → A head' (_ , x ∷ _) = x


0

Actually, it's possible to define this function with almost the same type. postfixApp : {A : Set}{n m k : ℕ} -> (Vec A n -> Vec A m) -> Vec A (n + k) -> Vec A (k + m) postfixApp f xs with splitAt' (reverse xs) ... | ys , zs = reverse zs ++ f (reverse ys) test-func : Vec Bool 3 -> Vec Bool 2 test-func (x1 ∷ x2 ∷ x3 ∷ []) = (x1 ∧ x2) ∷ (x2 ∨ ...


8

When you see a family of types, you may wonder whether each of the arguments it has are parameters or indices. Parameters are merely indicative that the type is somewhat generic, and behaves parametrically with regards to the argument supplied. What this means for instance, is that the type List T will have the same shapes regardless of which T you ...


2

Here is an example of a type paramerised by some value: open import Data.Nat infixr 4 _∷_ data ≤List (n : ℕ) : Set where [] : ≤List n _∷_ : {m : ℕ} -> m ≤ n -> ≤List n -> ≤List n 1≤3 : 1 ≤ 3 1≤3 = s≤s z≤n 3≤3 : 3 ≤ 3 3≤3 = s≤s (s≤s (s≤s z≤n)) example : ≤List 3 example = 3≤3 ∷ 1≤3 ∷ [] It's a type of lists with every element less or ...


1

Since we don't need proofs for no cases, it's probably better to switch to this datatype: data Dec' {p} (P : Set p) : Set p where yes : (p : P) → Dec' P no : Dec' P Because there are n * (n - 1) no cases and n yes cases. So this representation is pretty scalable. It's also possible to make all this decidability work automatically. Here is the main ...


3

Let's generalize your transform a little: foldAExp : {A : Set} -> (ℕ -> A) -> (_ _ _ : A -> A -> A) -> AExp -> A foldAExp f0 f1 f2 f3 (ANum x) = f0 x foldAExp f0 f1 f2 f3 (APlus a b) = f1 (foldAExp f0 f1 f2 f3 a) (foldAExp f0 f1 f2 f3 b) foldAExp f0 f1 f2 f3 (AMinus a b) = f2 (foldAExp f0 f1 f2 f3 a) (foldAExp f0 f1 f2 f3 b) ...


4

Coq has been designed with theorem proving in mind, whereas Agda has been designed with dependently-typed programming in mind. They are somewhat equivalent on the theoretical side (even though they have differences, Coq being slightly more conservative in its axioms and sticking closer to the mathematical foundation of CIC by default), but I would trust ...


3

Something like the following perhaps? The important thing is how you represent variables. The answer is that in a typed setting, variables need to be indexed by a type. If you make that change, everything more or less follows... module Temp2 where open import Data.Unit open import Data.Empty open import Relation.Binary.PropositionalEquality data Type : ...


2

You can do something like this: open import Level open import Function hiding (id) open import Data.Nat open import Data.Vec data Id {α : Level} {A : Set α} : A -> Set α where id : (x : A) -> Id x flip-id : {α β γ : Level} {A : Set α} {B : A -> Set β} {C : (x : A) -> B x -> Set γ} {x : A} -> ((x : A) -> (y : B x) -> C x y) ...


2

There were some changes in how the termination checker works (as far as I know, new algorithm was used to make the --termination-depth option obsolete). The first recursive call is actually fine. It's structurally recursive, but I have no idea why it's being marked. It's the second one that is causing problems. If you make it structurally recursive, Agda ...


0

It could be defined if you use the same a : A in both functions, i.e. foo : {A : Set} {B C : A → Set}(a : A) → (A → B a → C a) → (B a → A → C a) foo a f Ba _ = f a Ba


3

What you describe is not currying. It's a simple swapping of arguments. Here's how currying looks like: open import Data.Product hiding (curry) -- non-dependent version curry′ : ∀ {a b c} {A : Set a} {B : Set b} {C : Set c} → (A × B → C) → (A → B → C) curry′ f a b = f (a , b) -- dependent version curry : ∀ {a b c} {A : Set a} {B : A → Set b} ...


1

This is not really an answer to your specific question but: Your definitions look quite complicated. They don't really need to be that involved. inc : ∀ {n} → Bin n → Bin (suc n) inc zero = 2*n+1 zero inc (2*n b) = 2*n+1 b inc (2*n+1 {n} b) rewrite ℕCS.+-comm (suc n) n = 2*n (inc b) lem : ∀ n → 2*n+1 (inc (nat2bin n)) ≅ inc (inc (2*n+1 (nat2bin n))) lem n ...


1

Imports: open import Level hiding (zero; suc) open import Function open import Relation.Binary.HeterogeneousEquality renaming (sym to hsym; trans to htrans; cong to hcong; subst to hsubst) open import Relation.Binary.PropositionalEquality open import Data.Nat open import Data.Fin hiding (_+_) open import Algebra open import Data.Nat.Properties module ...


2

It turns out that this problem is somewhat similar to this one, except that here injective type constructors don't help. Normally you can use the subst for heterogeneous equality when it is evident that the two types on the sides of the equality are equal: hsubst : {A : Set} (P : A → Set) {x x' : A} → x ≅ x' → P x → P x' hsubst P refl p ...


2

In your first example the expression rr aa has type Set, because it is the result of the application of aa of type S to the function rr of type S -> Set. The type signature of your function demands a result type of R a though. Given the naming of your parameters the expected result type is rr aa. The type checker now tries to unify the expected type (rr ...



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