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31

I find it interesting that none of the responses so far have touched on what I consider to be a fundamental insight into modern development practices, and that is that the "old fashioned" way of writing software by gathering requirements, doing analysis and modelling the desired system before writing any code actually had a lot going for it. TDD actually ...


16

So, as far as my case goes, I have written unit tests, but I find myself going to start writing code first instead of writing a test. I feel there's a thought / design / paradigm change which is actually huge. So, though one really believes in TDD, you actually end up going back old style because of time pressure / project deliverables. ...


15

Option 1 of course. Your velocity for the next iteration is going to be less, as it is based on yesterdays weather, so the next iteration you have a better chance of being complete. In scrum you are time-boxing. And you only deliver features that work. In the sprint planning you have made an estimate of what you could deliver. The customer has to accept a ...


14

We use something inspired by the famous Scrum and XP from the Trenches from Henrik Kniberg, the columns being adapted depending on the context (often: TODO, ON GOING, TO BE TESTED, DONE): Product Backlog Items (PBIs) are printed as "physical cards" (A5 format) for the Sprint Planning Meeting (at least the most important). Once the team has picked up PBIs ...


14

I've been using Pivotal Tracker which is a free agile project management tool and covers the following agile concepts: Velocity tracking and emergent iterations Story-based iterative planning Real-time collaboration Would certainly recommend you try this before paying for an alternative. Also, as mentioned, Basecamp is a great tool for maintaining ...


13

Among other things, it means that a team can spend an amazing amount of time building a complex system that will handle all possible eventualities - or it can do only what is needed right now, get it right, and get it out the door. The KISS principle is related - keep the program simple, it will be easier to write, easier to maintain, and out the door ...


11

Are KISS and YAGNI at odds with the trends towards increasingly more sophisticated ... A car has an accelator and a brake, and a steering wheel that can turn left and/or right: it's up to the drivers to decide which to use when.


10

You might prefer: Simplicity -- the art of minimizing the amount of work done -- is essential. Basically, this just means cutting out needless effort wherever possible, including within your own agile process.


9

TargetProcess is the least intrusive project mgmt tool I've used.


8

In my opinion, burndown charts can't go negative. If you're done with your work you either keep on sitting in your chairs doing nothing which means that the burndown will stay at zero. If you indeed do something, then that should be added to your list of tasks, meaning that the burndown will go up and then down again when you're done with tasks you added to ...


8

The Spiral Model is an example of iterative development. A typical iteration will be somewhere between 6 months and 2 years and will include all aspects of the lifecycle - requirements analysis, risk analysis, planning, design and architecture, and then a release of either a prototype (which is either evolved or thrown away, depending on the specific methods ...


7

Here is our Kanban Board that we use at TargetProcess. We do not work on Tasks level, just on User Stories and Bugs level. Sometimes we create tasks, but they are not tracked explicitly on the board. We do not estimate User Stories and Bugs, but try to split Stories into smaller (with mixed success). Columns are self-explanatory. We accumulate items in ...


7

One aspect of DevOps that is most relevant to developers is about automation, specifically infrastructure as code. The DevOps utopia is having push-button deployments that will automatically create new boxes, install all dependencies, upload the app, and set all the appropriate configuration values. As with Test Driven Development in application ...


6

Do you create a story in retrospect for that defect to be linked to? Yes. It's worthy of review, also, to be sure everyone agrees on the story. If it's a bug-free, but annoying interface, then you are really modifying the workflow, and it does need to be memorialized as a proper story. If there's a bug involved, then there are unit tests which ...


6

It's simple: By learning to think about the "What" __before__ you think about the "How" In other words, think about exactly what you want to do (interface), rather than you how you are going to do it (implementation) TDD, as a design tool, based on my experience, really helps you look at things from the user perspective than the coder perspective. In ...


6

In my opinion, a key success factor for agile development is to focus on delivering value for the customer in each iteration. I would definitely pick "ugly stuff that does work" over "shiny stuff that doesn't work". Doing shiny UIs and trying to get the client to understand hat business logic takes a lot of time to implement is always risky which Joel ...


6

A common anti-pattern for Scrum and XP teams is to break stories down into tasks, track those tasks, and at the end of the iteration notice that all tasks are done, but the user stories aren't (because they are more than just the sum of their tasks). I highly recommend not tracking tasks at all. Brainstorm them for estimation, if you like, but always ...


6

First, you can produce documentation and remain agile, if the customer or the Product Owner requests to have (read is ready to pay for) documentation. Grow your documentation incrementally and iteratively, as you'll do with code. Test a little , code a little and ... document a little. I see three ways of doing this : either include the time to write the ...


6

If you want action, you're going to have to start talking the Product Owner's language, and you're going to need to attach consequences to the overdue items. Not in the "we'll send you to bed without dinner" or "we, the engineers, will be unhappy!" sense, but in the "here's what the impact on the project in dollars/euros is" sense. Money tends to get product ...


6

Scrum / Extreme programming storyboard. http://www.flickr.com/photos/dafydd%5Fll%5Frees/4138686549/ Work appears on the second-from left colum, and progresses across the board through different stages of completeness. Column names: Not Started, Just Started, Half-Way, Almost Done, Ready for Showcase (passed QA) The first row is specially reserved for ...


5

I'm not convinced that the choice of tool will necessarily bring about an improvement on the part of the product owner but I'm sure that a poor choice will only make things worse. But it sounds to me like your 'product owner' isn't on-board with the role s/he has. I suggest that a (very amicable) sit-down, be it in-person (best) or using some "go to ...


5

Whiteboard and sticky notes or note cards. I know you asked for software, but depending on your environment it might be hard to beat the communication value of a publicly visible task chart. But if you must have software there's also Rally and VersionOne.


5

http://www.tvagile.com/2011/01/10/daily-scrum-stand-up-meeting-at-facebook/ is the link referred to above. It claims to be a daily Scrum but does not appear to follow the rules...


5

The way in which we have done this is; In Visual Studio (I have Visual Studio Ultimate 2012) Go to Team Explorer - Home (Make sure you are in the correct collection / project) In the drop down menu navigate to Projects & My Team & Select New Team Project Enter your desired team project name and description Select the Microsoft Visual Studio Scrum ...


5

This translates to: Always do the simplest thing that does the job required. As developers we're often tempted to come up with a gold-plated solution that does 101 cool things as well as what is required. This usually takes longer, and will likely be harder to maintain in future. So always do the simplest thing that will actually work.


5

Timetracking: slimtimer.com. This is one of the best time trackers I've seen (and I've seen many) Mercurial code hosting: list available here. I've only used the service provided by sourceforge.net and was satisfied with it. Web conferencing, desktop and whiteboard sharing: Dimdim. I haven't had much luck with it, but I believe it might perform much better ...


5

"Agile" and "working long hours" are orthogonal concepts. Working on an Agile team doesn't mean you start at 9 and end at 5 no matter what. Addressing a culture of over-worked and under-resourced teams is a different challenge from introducing Agile, and in such an environment you may have a hard time effecting change. I'd start by examining why you're ...


5

"So, though one really believes in TDD, you actually end up going back old style because of time pressure / project deliverables." Actually, I don't think this can be possibly be true. If you are "going back old style", the only reason can be because you do not believe that TDD will produce better code more quickly. I think that someone stops ...


5

You should make your clients follow a Change Management process, irrespective whether you use Scrum or not. You must agree that you're not immediately doing what your clients ask but arrange the items according to priority and plan them before doing it. If these are some urgent issues, like bugs found on production you should anyway follow the process but ...



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