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The tasks are not really estimated in hours but ideal hours. It's really hard to predict how many ideal hours will be available in a week, and it's generally not a good idea at all to infer the capacity on a sprint based on hour estimates. See for example this Scrum Alliance blog article Story points and task hour comparison can be thought of as the ...


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If you are looking for different granularity in time (sprints vs releases/versions) and/or detail level (feature set changes vs development tasks) then a good approach is to separate these to 2 different projects and use issue linking as needed. Then in the high-level project you get a nice view for all the stakeholders and your long-term roadmap planning. ...


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Following are a few simple tips, that might be helpful for you - Split large stories along the boundaries of the data supported by the story. Split large stories based on the operations that are performed within the story. Split large stories into separate CRUD [Create, Read, Update, Delete] operations. Consider removing cross-cutting concerns (such as ...


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As you just wish to use the source code control, it won't make any difference which of those templates you use. Because VSO forces you to choose, I'd be inclined to select Agile. This is because you're a lone developer whereas scrum is intended for a scrum team. (I've not used CMMI so cannot comment on that)


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I would document deliberately unsupported use cases/stories/requirements/features in your test files, which are much more likely to be regularly consulted, updated, etc. than specifications would be. I'd document each unsupported feature in the highest-level test file in which it was appropriate to discuss that feature. If it was an entire use case, I'd ...


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Looks like what you are looking for is called as Deployment Pipeline which as mentioned by @prasanna is the key part of Continuous Delivery. Key for Continuous Delivery is Continuous Integration [which in turn requires automated tests] and automated deployment with Configuration Management tools. Regarding the tool, you can use Jenkins along with its ...


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I opened a ticket at Atlassian and they replied with the following: According to our article on Getting Agile Ready with Atlassian OnDemand: JIRA permissions — Your users need to have the following permissions: Creating/Linking pages to an epic: Requires 'Edit Issues' permission. Creating/Linking pages to an sprint/sprint report: Requires ...


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You should never test undefined behavior, by ...definition. The moment you test a behavior, you are defining it. In practice, either it's valuable to handle a hedge case or it isn't. If it is, then there should be a user story for it, which acts as documentation for that edge case. What you don't want to have is an old user story documenting a future ...


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You need to make sure to create a parent link to the PBI/UserStory/Requirement. Orphan tasks won't show up in the sprint board, and one of the benefits of web access is it usually creates the links for you automatically, on VS you need to create the link manually. Also be sure to set the area properly if you have multiple teams.


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There are several framework to test routines in the different kind of databases. Some of them follow the xUnit specification, and this allows to have jUnit-like tests at database level. For DB2, there is a framework called db2unit: https://github.com/angoca/db2unit With this framework you can compare objects (numbers, dates, boolean, strings, etc.) like ...


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Agile has a Functional Specification document in the form of the agile Features list, Product Backlog and even as far into the sprint as tasks in the sprint Backlogs too. The fact they are not called documents doesn't make them any less. And the difference from the Functional Spec in waterfall?...Agile Functional Spec only contains what is required (lol) ...



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