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I tried the code below to produce alarm every 24 hours. It works fine but when you launch the App the first time you will see the notification. But later on it wont produce notification when you open the App. pendingIntent = PendingIntent.getBroadcast(this, 0, myIntent, PendingIntent.FLAG_NO_CREATE); boolean testval = (pendingIntent == null); ...


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Alarm Manager is perfectly the correct approach to trigger your app activity again and do the needful work. From the reference These allow you to schedule your application to be run at some point in the future. When an alarm goes off, the Intent that had been registered for it is broadcast by the system, automatically starting the target application if it ...


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Do not keep an array of Pending intents. As you correctly diagnosed, your array is empty after the app is closed which causes a crash when you are trying to access them again. Set up ONLY the earliest alarm. Save the ID of the alarm to temp storage (e.g SharedPreferences). (If it is easier, you can also use a constant value for the ID as you now only have ...


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I think you should add the closing alarm method to the ondestroy method of your app, because if an user closes your app without stopping them, your method will never be called causing the crash of the app. hope it works :) EDIT: try to have a look at service and similar. some months ago i did use them in an android app and i remember that even if i close ...


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Use AlarmClock API Provided by Studio instead of AlarmManager if you are going to set an Alarm


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From the documentation. If the stated trigger time is in the past, the alarm will be triggered immediately, with an alarm count depending on how far in the past the trigger time is relative to the repeat interval. For testing purposes, change the public void setRepeating (int type, long triggerAtMillis, long intervalMillis, PendingIntent operation) set ...


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You're using PendingIntent.getService, but your intent is not for a service. For a BroadcastReceiver, you should be using PendingIntent.getBroadcast. PendingIntent pendingIntent = PendingIntent.getBroadcast(this, 0, intent, 0);


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In order for the system to be able to launch a component, it should be registered in your manifest: AndroidManifest.xml <manifest xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android" package="com.mypackage.myapplication" > <application android:allowBackup="true" android:icon="@mipmap/ic_launcher" ...


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The problem you're running into is that you can't set an exact, repeatable alarm in Android. If you want your repeating alarm to occur at an exact time, you must set a one time exact alarm and recreate it after the alarm goes off in your code. Citation: Documentation for setRepeating


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Change the following line: alarmManager.set(AlarmManager.ELAPSED_REALTIME_WAKEUP, 3*60*1000, pendingIntent); to: alarmManager.setRepeating(AlarmManager.RTC_WAKEUP, c.getTimeInMillis() + 3 * 60 * 1000, 3 * 60 * 1000, pendingIntent); The alarm is fired up immediately, because AlarmManager.ELAPSED_REALTIME_WAKEUP + 0, ... So, the first time, it is ...


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Are you canceling them somehow? Remember that everytime you call setRepeating() with different IDs (the second parameter) you'll duplicate your alarm. Try canceling all of your alarms by calling alarmManager.cancel(pendingIntent).


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Instead of alarm.setRepeating(int type, long triggerAtMillis, long intervalMillis, PendingIntent operation), you need to use alarm.set(int type, long triggerAtMillis, PendingIntent operation)


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One Important thing to note: When registering your broadcast receiver with an Intent-Filter, you need to add the exported attribute and set it to false. Like this: <service android:name=".utility.AlarmReceiver" android:exported="false"> <intent-filter> <action android:name="NOTIFICATION_SERVICE" /> ...


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For API 17 or higher to customize fonts, you need to download .ttf file for any fonts you want then create a directory assets/fonts/ then save your fonts Typeface fonttype fonttype = Typeface.createFromAsset(getActivity().getAssets(), "fonts/robotoregular.ttf"); textclock.setTypeface(fonttype);


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Here are my suggestions, hopefully somewhere in here is something that fixes your issue. Don't use == to compare strings in your service (or anywhere). Use .equals() with named constants. Your PendingIntents only differ by extras. When you give the same Intent to PendingIntent, it only keeps one of them. For the purposes of comparing Intents, extras are ...


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According to the documentation http://developer.android.com/reference/android/app/AlarmManager.html#setRepeating%28int,%20long,%20long,%20android.app.PendingIntent%29, the 2nd parameter is the trigger time in milliseconds and if you set it to a time in the past, the alarm will trigger immediately. If you want the alarm to only start from next Wednesday, then ...


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I realize this thread is old, but the answers are not easy to find, and could be of use. I've spent a good bit of time working out what these messages mean. Q1: Batches Pending alarm batches: 23 Alarms are organized into batches. As described in the documentation: Beginning in API 19, the trigger time passed to this method is treated as inexact: the ...


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Use this link to get Textclock below API level 17. You could use .setTypeface(Typeface.createFromAsset(getAssets(),fonts/font.ttf")); with it.


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Intent intent = new Intent("com.my.package.MY_UNIQUE_ACTION"); PendingIntent pendingIntent = PendingIntent.getBroadcast(context, 0, intent, PendingIntent.FLAG_UPDATE_CURRENT);


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boolean alarmUp = (PendingIntent.getBroadcast(context, 0, new Intent("com.my.package.MY_UNIQUE_ACTION"), PendingIntent.FLAG_NO_CREATE) != null); In the above statememnt "com.mypackage" is package name where as "MY_UNIQUE_ACTION" is class name where you handle AlarmManager. The key here is the FLAG_NO_CREATE which as described in the ...


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I stucked 1 day for this problem, and finally solved this. AlarmManager is used to generate a broadcast every 30 seconds, and a broadcast receiver is used to receive the message and execute ... So the main problem is the following 2 steps 1. In the AndroidManifist.xml a action filter needed. <receiver ...


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Yes alarm will get cleared once the device is rebooted.From the android docs This class provides access to the system alarm services. These allow you to schedule your application to be run at some point in the future. When an alarm goes off, the Intent that had been registered for it is broadcast by the system, automatically starting the target ...


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You'll need to save the value in SharedPreferences and restart the app with a modified alarm. I'd save the value at some interval and also detect phone shutdown (using broadcasts)


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In your activity Replace following PendingIntent pi = PendingIntent.getService(this, 0, notificationmassage, PendingIntent.FLAG_UPDATE_CURRENT); with PendingIntent pi = PendingIntent.getBroadcast(this, 0, notificationmassage, PendingIntent.FLAG_UPDATE_CURRENT);


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public void getNotification(Context context,String Message){ int icon = R.drawable.appicon; int when =(int) System.currentTimeMillis(); NotificationManager notificationManager = (NotificationManager) context.getSystemService(Context.NOTIFICATION_SERVICE); Notification notification = ...


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Starting from API 19, alarm delivery is inexact (see docs). Outside of that, why do you want to restart your app if it is stopped? That doesn't sound right ....


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Its a bit late but maybe this can help someone. As I see onNewIntent is called when the activity is opened on the background. When you send an intent to an activity that isn't running on the background you can retrieve it through getIntent on onResume(). I would change you code to the following. @Override protected void onResume() { super.onResume(); ...


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Service Constantly runs in Background , will drain battery Can be killed by android or user might go to setting and kill it manually Will be killed if phone is switched off service was basically meant to do background services like loading and uploading data on separate thread, for your purpose AlarmManager is useful and it will not be killed by ...


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It's better to use an alarm. A service can be killed by the OS.


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I fixed this by adding a stopSelf() after the notification was created in the onCreate of the ReminderService. Explanation: The AlarmManager created the ReminderService without a hitch. The problem was that the Service hung around after firing off the notification. Then after force closing, it would persist and fire off another notification.


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I find the answer. In AlarmReceiver initialize the Request params then remove the parameters inside the WebService then put the message coming from another class. This is the code. public class AlarmReceiver extends BroadcastReceiver { RequestParams params = new RequestParams(); @Override public void onReceive(final Context context, Intent ...


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I had the same problem... You have 2 options as I know till now: The easiest - If you are using API level 16 or higher you can simply add android:fontFamily="sans-serif-thin" attribute for example in your xml file. Works like a charm! This is my TextView: <TextView android:id="@+id/Time" android:layout_width="match_parent" ...


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This is what I have used in one of my application, working perfectly. i have used this to post the data on server in every 15 min. public class BackgroundService extends Service { public static final String ACTION_PING = "com.example.ACTION_PING"; public static final String ACTION_CONNECT = "com.example.ACTION_CONNECT"; public ...


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You can create a Service that should be called when the alarm goes off. The Service should include all the needed code for calling your web service. In order to reschedule the call to the web service, you can use AlarmManager.setRepeating() method. So, extends an IntentService (it is an implementation of Service class, that simplify your work) in this way: ...


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Your going to need to set another alarm to preform a function when it goes off.


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You need either a wakeful intent service or a WakefulBroadcastReceiver - change the pending intent to a broadcast (PendingIntent pendingIntent = PendingIntent.getBroadcast...) set up a receiver and in the receiver launch a Wakeful Intent Service - or set up a WakefulBroadcastReceiver. The alarm managerholds a wakelock while onReceive runs - by using a WIS ...


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You could use MediaPlayer's setScreenOnWhilePlaying() to ensure that your application doesn't go to sleep while the audio plays in the background. http://developer.android.com/reference/android/media/MediaPlayer.html#setWakeMode%28android.content.Context,%20int%29 Another possible solution is the use the PowerManager to keep your device awake with a ...


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You do not need to hold wake lock. Only do that when you want to prevent device from going to sleep. In your case, you simply want device to wake you up. Using either RTC_WAKEUP or ELAPSED_REALTIME_WAKEUP will accomplish this goal. You can obtain the wake lock upon waking up to prevent device from immediately going back to sleep if you are going to process ...


0

Try these : getWindow().addFlags(WindowManager.LayoutParams.FLAG_SHOW_WHEN_LOCKED); getWindow().addFlags(WindowManager.LayoutParams.FLAG_DISMISS_KEYGUARD); getWindow().addFlags(WindowManager.LayoutParams.FLAG_KEEP_SCREEN_ON); getWindow().addFlags(WindowManager.LayoutParams.FLAG_TURN_SCREEN_ON); And add this permission in manifest: ...


1

this is your problem android.util.AndroidRuntimeException: Calling startActivity() from outside of an Activity context requires the FLAG_ACTIVITY_NEW_TASK flag. Is this really what you want? when you want to start an activity by a non activity context you have to add FLAG_ACTIVITY_NEW_TASK flag to the starter intent so your onStartCommand code would be ...


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The problem you are seeing is because the Intent being sent to start the Activity is being sent from Service, so its Context has no notion of task/back stack. The logcat shows you that you need to add the flag FLAG_ACTIVITY_NEW_TASK to the Intent from the Service in order to get the Activity started. All of that being said, you are likely still going to ...


0

Try using this line for pendingIntent pendingIntent= PendingIntent.getBroadcast(mContext, 0, intent, 0);


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It seems you schedule timer for time which is already passed so it is called as soon you request alarmManager.setInexactRepeating Here is code to fix your issue: public static void scheduleVerseNotificationService(Context mContext) { AlarmManager alarmManager = (AlarmManager) mContext.getSystemService(Context.ALARM_SERVICE); Intent intent = new ...


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I had some trouble understanding your questions so: I only want it should schedule in such a way it should execute at 8:00 instead of everytime I open app. I understood that as "I only want to execute an Activity at 8:00, and not when I start that Activity" So, a suggestion is: @Override protected void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) { ...


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If you need the alarm to be triggered at 9AM sharp, don't use setRepeating() as it will not launch at the exact time since Android KitKat (this is also documented, you should really read the docs). Use Calendar to build the timestamp from your desired alarm time. Check if the result timestamp is smaller than the current timestamp System.currentTimeMillis(), ...


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As Bonatti said above, this is documented behaviour of the API when you set a time in the past. You will need logic in your app to push out the alarm by 24hrs if it is already past 10am at the time when you want to set the alarm. The easiest way to do this is probably to use the Calendar object as you have, then query if ...


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Just to add to Bhushan answer. Make sure to set alarm on boot as all registered alarms are cleared if device is turned off and rebooted.


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I noticed that using WIFI_MODE_FULL_HIGH_PERF you don't need to keep the screen on, but it will consume more power. However, if you really need to keep the screen on, I also noticed that SCREEN_DIM_WAKE_LOCK is a deprecated constant and they recommend using FLAG_KEEP_SCREEN_ON (but this will keep the screen bright). Besides this, try to check in the logs ...


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Two solutions: 1) Instead of PendingIntent pendingIntent = PendingIntent.getBroadcast(mContext, 0, intent, 0); use PendingIntent pendingIntent = PendingIntent.getService(mContext, 0, intent, 0); 2) if that does not work then you need to create an alarm receiver public class AlarmReceiver extends WakefulBroadcastReceiver { @Override ...


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From Android 19, you should be using the new AlarmManager.setExact() method if you want exact timing instead of AlarmManager.set() as your code does. This is mentioned in the AlarmManager API documentation: Note: Beginning with API 19 (KITKAT) alarm delivery is inexact: the OS will shift alarms in order to minimize wakeups and battery use. There are new ...



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