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31

Do we have [an underlying model] for programming languages? Heavens, yes. And because there are so many programming languages, there are multiple models to choose from. Most important first: Church's untyped lambda calculus is a model of computation that is as powerful as a Turing machine (no more and no less). The famous "Church-Turing hypothesis" ...


24

Maybe a slightly different take on your question, but still... The functional language Haskell uses concepts from algebra (particularly category theory) such as monads, monoids, arrows and whatnot. Using Haskell's typeclasses, you could also make any object into a group, or a ring, for example, simply by defining operations (operators) on them. Guaranteeing ...


20

finding the maximum of 2 variables: max = a-((a-b)&((a-b)>>31)) where >> is bitwise right-shift (also called SHR or ASR depeding on signedness). Instead of 31 you use the number of bits your numbers have minus one.


20

You could make use of Java 1.6's scripting capabilities: import javax.script.*; import java.util.*; public class Main { public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception { ScriptEngine engine = new ScriptEngineManager().getEngineByName("JavaScript"); Map<String, Object> vars = new HashMap<String, Object>(); ...


18

The text that you want here is Abstract Algebra, A Computational Approach by Chuck Sims. The author will recommend that you use the APL programming language. The book is out of print, but you can probably find it in your library. There is also the GAP Computer Algebra System which is fun to use for group theory. Advanced resources: Magma: fairly ...


16

c = Math.log(a)/Math.log(b)


16

I believe he was talking about generic programming (he coined the term), whether meant in the context of this talk about the STL, or 'at large', in the sense of: programming against a sort of interface that describes something that could fit all (and hopefully several) types (hence multi-sorted), ... ... provided they have some properties, often something ...


14

(Full disclosure: I am the lead developer of SymPy) The first thing you should understand is that SymPy and Sage are not quite the same thing. SymPy is a pure Python library, that does computer algebra. Sage is a collection of open source mathematical software. Sage tries to gather together all the major open source mathematics software, and glue it ...


12

I guess this one would be the most simplest if we manage to find difference between two numbers (only the magnitude not sign) max = ((a+b)+|a-b|)/2; where |a-b| is a magnitude of difference between a and b.


12

The inverse of that function would be: points = ((level + 1)**2 - 4) * 20 (where ** is the power operator).


12

I'd recommend writing your own routines. When I wrote my raytracer, I found that most of the algebra used the same small collection of methods. Basically all you need is a vector class that supports addition, subtraction, etc. And from there all you really need is Dot and Cross. And to be honest using GLSL isn't going to give you much more than that ...


12

The functionality in Scipy is rather Matlab-like. So the question is whether you just want the core linear algebra / vector-matrix mathematics operations, or all sorts of things like clustering. If you are not aware of both Scalala (now called Breeze) and ScalaLab, you should check them out--maybe they'll suit your needs. If you need a more diverse ...


11

MIT OpenCourseWare offers a free course in Linear Algebra. May be too general for your very specific interests, but it's free. :)


11

For all of your sample the following formula provides the expected result: C = (A + B) / (2 * A * B) As ypercube pointed out in the comments this formula is the inverse of the Harmonic mean or the arithmetic mean of the inverses.


11

I wrote a talk on this topic called "Slicing It" in 2009. It certainly points to the work by my Strathclyde colleagues, Johann and Ghani, on initial algebra semantics for GADTs. I used the notation which SHE provides for writing data-indexed types, but that has pleasingly been superseded by the "promotion" story. The key point of the talk is, as per my ...


11

The simplest instance I could find was just {-# LANGUAGE UndecidableInstances, FlexibleContexts #-} import Data.Function (on) instance Eq (f (Fix f)) => Eq (Fix f) where (==) = (==) `on` unFix All that we require is that Fix f is an instance of Eq precisely when f (Fix f) is an instance of Eq. Since in general we have instances like Eq a => Eq (f ...


10

This works for me: (10^N-1)/9*x


10

Euler angles are more human understandable and also good for decomposing rotations into indiviual degrees of freedom (for kinematic joints and the like) but have disadvantages like ambiguity and gimbal lock. In practice I would prefer quaternions, as they easier to compute with (for the computer, not for humans) and more efficient. You have to make three ...


10

There's also exp4j, an expression evaluator based on Dijkstra's Shunting Yard. It's freely available and redistributable under the Apache License 2.0, only 25kb in size and quite easy to use. Calculable calc = new ExpressionBuilder("3 * sin(y) - 2 / (x - 2)") .withVariable("x", varX) .withVariable("y", varY) .build() double ...


10

Math.Pow computes x y for some x and y. Math.Exp computes e x for some x, where e is Euler's number. Note that while Math.Pow(Math.E, d) produces the same result as Math.Exp(d), a quick benchmark comparison shows that Math.Exp actually executes about twice as fast as Math.Pow: Trial Operations Pow Exp 1 1000 0.0002037 0.0001344 ...


9

Well, you have the right general model. You just need more rules and to recursively apply the simplification process. simplify :: Expr -> Expr simplify (Mult (Const 0) x) = Const 0 simplify (Mult x (Const 0)) = Const 0 simplify (Plus (Const 0) x) = simplify x simplify (Plus x (Const 0)) = simplify x simplify (Mult (Const 1) x) = simplify x simplify ...


9

!p || q is plenty fast. seriously, don't worry about it.


9

~p | q For visualization: perl -e'printf "%x\n", (~0x1100 | 0x1010) & 0x1111' 1011 In tight code, this should be faster than "!p || q" because the latter has a branch, which might cause a stall in the CPU due to a branch prediction error. The bitwise version is deterministic and, as a bonus, can do 32 times as much work in a 32-bit integer than the ...


8

If you ask a mathematician, an engineer, and a game programmer what linear algebra is, you'll get three different answers. Mathematicians will focus on fascinating but abstract topics such as linear independence and abstract vector spaces. Engineers will focus on eigenvectors, which are used to solve differential equations. For graphics, you are typically ...


8

capacity = (range() * bucket) / (hash - _min) + 1; bucket = (hash - _min) * ((_capacity - 1) / range()); // start bucket = ((hash - _min) * (_capacity - 1)) / range(); // rearrange range() * bucket = (hash - _min) * (_capacity - 1); // multiply by range (range() * bucket) / (hash - _min) = _capacity - 1; // divide by (hash - _min) (range() * bucket) / ...


8

Lisp is based on Lambda Calculus, and is the inspiration for much of what we see in modern languages today. Von-Neumann machines are the foundation of modern computers, which were first programmed in assembler language, then in FORmula TRANslator. Then the formal linguistic theory of context-free-grammars was applied, and underlies the syntax of all modern ...


8

In Javascript ^ means XOR. For exponentiation you need Math.pow(x, y). function fermat(a, p) { return Math.pow(a, p - 1) % p === 1; }


8

The answer is a complex number, so you need to give it a complex argument: > (4-7+0i)^1.3 [1] -2.451751-3.374545i but remember this is only one root...


8

I have run over this exact same problem before. Stay with me here... This problem involves two parts: 1. Find the point at which they intersect to find where two lines intersect, we use the two equations of the lines: y = M1x + B1 y = M2x + B2 Using substitution: M1x + B1 = M2x + B2 M1x - M2x = B2 - B1 x(M1 - M2) = B2 - B1 x = (B2 - B1) / (M1 - M2) ...


7

There are 2 main methods to solve: Numeric methods. Numerical methods mean, basically, that the solver tries to change the value of x until the equation is satisfied. More info on numerical methods. Symbolic math. The solver manipulates the equation as a string of symbols, by a number of formal rules. It's not that different from algebra we learn in ...



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