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117

(The following applies to GHC, other compilers may use different storage conventions) Rule of thumb: a constructor costs one word for a header, and one word for each field. Exception: a constructor with no fields (like Nothing or True) takes no space, because GHC creates a single instance of these constructors and shares it amongst all uses. A word is 4 ...


89

Disclaimer: A lot of this doesn't really work quite right when you account for ⊥, so I'm going to blatantly disregard that for the sake of simplicity. A few initial points: Note that "union" is probably not the best term for A+B here--that's specifically a disjoint union of the two types, because the two sides are distinguished even if their types are ...


81

Haskell's algebraic data types are named such since they correspond to an initial algebra in category theory, giving us some laws, some operations and some symbols to manipulate. We may even use algebraic notation for describing regular data structures, where: + represents sum types (disjoint unions, e.g. Either). • represents product types (e.g. structs ...


69

What are the traditional sums-and-products data structures he is referring to? In type theory, regular data structures can be described in terms of sums, products and recursive types. This leads to an algebra for describing data structures (and so-called algebraic data types). Such data types are common in statically typed functional languages, such as ...


52

Yes, you are correct, you are looking for algebraic data types. There is a great tutorial on them at Learn You a Haskell. For the record, the concept of an abstract class from OOP actually has three different translations into Haskell, and ADTs are just one. Here is a quick overview of the techniques. Algebraic Data Types Algebraic data types encode the ...


35

In shang's answer you can see how to represent a graph using laziness. The problem with these representations is that they are very difficult to change. The knot-tying trick is useful only if you're going to build a graph once, and afterward it never changes. In practice, should I actually want to do something with my graph, I use the more pedestrian ...


30

Binary trees are defined by the equation T=1+XT^2 in the semiring of types. By construction, T=(1-sqrt(1-4X))/(2X) is defined by the same equation in the semiring of complex numbers. So given that we're solving the same equation in the same class of algebraic structure it actually shouldn't be surprising that we see some similarities. The catch is that when ...


24

I also find it awkward to try to represent data structures with cycles in a pure language. It's the cycles that are really the problem; because values can be shared any ADT that can contain a member of the type (including lists and trees) is really a DAG (Directed Acyclic Graph). The fundamental issue is that if you have values A and B, with A containing B ...


22

It's true, graphs are not algebraic. To deal with this problem, you have a couple of options: Instead of graphs, consider infinite trees. Represent cycles in the graph as their infinite unfoldings. In some cases, you may use the trick known as "tying the knot" (explained well in some of the other answers here) to even represent these infinite trees in ...


21

As Ben mentioned, cyclic data in Haskell is constructed by a mechanism called "tying the knot". In practice, it means that we write mutually recursive declarations using let or where clauses, which works because the mutually recursive parts are lazily evaluated. Here's an example graph type: import Data.Maybe (fromJust) data Node a = Node { label ...


19

In universal algebra an algebra consists of some sets of elements (think of each set as the set of values of a type) and some operations, which map elements to elements. For example, suppose you have a type of "list elements" and a type of "lists". As operations you have the "empty list", which is a 0-argument function returning a "list", and a "cons" ...


19

You can't really do this with a standard function. The best approach is to have a map function for each field. Happily, you can generate these automatically with a bit of template haskell from the lens library. It would look something like this: data ManyFields a b c d = MF { _f1 :: a, _f2 :: b, _f3 :: c, _f4 :: d } makeLenses ''ManyFields This generates ...


18

If the pairing between Up and Down and so on is an important feature then maybe this knowledge should be reflected in the type. data Axis = UpDown | LeftRight | FrontBack data Sign = Positive | Negative data Dir = Dir Axis Sign inv is now easy.


17

What's a one hole context for an X in an X? There's no choice: it's (-), representable by the unit type. What's a one hole context for an X in an X*X? It's something like (-,x2) or (x1,-), so it's representable by X+X (or 2*X, if you like). What's a one hole context for an X in an X*X*X? It's something like (-,x2,x3) or (x1,-,x3) or (x1,x2,-), ...


17

I don't have a complete answer, but these manipulations tend to 'just work'. A relevant paper might be Objects of Categories as Complex Numbers by Fiore and Leinster - I came across that one while reading sigfpe's blog on a related subject ; the rest of that blog is a goldmine for similar ideas and is worth checking out! You can also differentiate ...


17

Very detailed answers have already been given, but somehow they don't mention this simple fact. Sum types are called so because the number of possible values of a sum type is the sum of the number of values of the two underlying types. Similarly for product types, the number of possible values is the product. This stems from type theory defining a type as ...


16

As you probably know, the main difference between data and newtype is that with data is that data constructors are lazy while newtype is strict, i.e. given the following types data D a = D a newtype N a = N a then D ⊥ `seq` x = x, but N ⊥ `seq` x = ⊥. What is perhaps less commonly known, however, is that when you pattern match on these constructors, ...


16

This is known as a lax monoidal functor. I highly recommend you read this paper which shows how Applicatives are one type of lax monoid and you can reformulate your type as an Applicative and get an equivalent interface: instance Applicative Stuff where pure a = Stuff a 0 (Stuff f m) <*> (Stuff x n) = Stuff (f x) (m + n) tmappend :: ...


15

"Algebraic Data Types" in Haskell support full parametric polymorphism, which is the more technically correct name for generics, as a simple example the list data type: data List a = Cons a (List a) | Nil Is equivalent (as much as is possible, and ignoring non-strict evaluation, etc) to class List<a> { class Cons : List<a> { a ...


15

The most direct way is to just do it by hand: fromList :: [Double] -> Maybe OrbitElements fromList [ _epoch , _ecc , _distPeri , _incl , _longAscNode , _argPeri , _timePeri , _meanMotion , _meanAnomaly , _trueAnomaly , _semiMajorAxis , _distApo , ...


15

Those aren't full implementations. For the full implementations, it is like counting from 0 to 7 (which is a total of 8 = 23 numbers) in binary, with each line of each implementation representing one of the three bits. All the possibilities look like this (if we call our function f): 1) f First = False f Second = False f Third = False 2) f First = ...


15

Well, coneptually there indeed is no difference and in fact other languages (OCaml, Elm) present tagged unions exactly that way - i.e., tags over tuples or first class records (which Haskell lacks). I personally consider this to be a design flaw in Haskell. There are some practical differences though: Laziness. Haskell's tuples are lazy and you can't ...


14

Another possible way: sameK x y = f x == f y where f (Alpha _) = 0 f (Beta _) = 1 f (Gamma _ _) = 2 -- runtime error when Delta value encountered A runtime error is not ideal, but better than silently giving the wrong answer.


14

Conceptually, I think that both languages provide the same power - in F# you can declare ADTs using discriminated unions and in Scala, you can use case classes. The declaration in Scala using classes may get a little bit longer than the F# version (as pointed out by Yin Zhu), but then you can use pattern matching with similar elegancy in both of the ...


14

You can achieve this by making Exp an instance of Eq instead of deriving Eq: instance Eq Exp where (Con a) == (Con b) = a == b (Var a) == (Var b) = a == b (Op Plus a b) == (Op Plus c d) = (a == c && b == d) || (a == d && c == b) Input == Input = True _ == _ = False This would compare Op Plus in the way wanted, but is ...


14

It seems that all you're doing is expanding the recurrence relation. L = 1 + X • L L = 1 + X • (1 + X • (1 + X • (1 + X • ...))) = 1 + X + X^2 + X^3 + X^4 ... T = 1 + X • T^2 L = 1 + X • (1 + X • (1 + X • (1 + X • ...^2)^2)^2)^2 = 1 + X + 2 • X^2 + 5 • X^3 + 14 • X^4 + ... And since the rules for the operations on the types work like the rules for ...


14

Doing this for a "list" is tricky using Haskell's type system, but can be done. As a starting point, it's easy enough if you restrict yourself to binary products and sums (and personally, I'd just stick with this): {-# LANGUAGE GADTs, DataKinds, TypeOperators, KindSignatures, TypeFamilies #-} import Prelude hiding (sum) -- for later -- * Universe of ...


14

Closed type families are what you're looking for: {-# LANGUAGE TypeFamilies #-} type family F a where F (x -> xs) = xs F x = x To fully answer your question, we need DataKinds to get type-level lists too: {-# LANGUAGE TypeFamilies, TypeOperators, DataKinds #-} type family F a :: [*] where F (x -> xs) = (x -> xs) ': (F xs) ...


13

What you are describing is commonly known as the expression problem -- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Expression_Problem. There is a definite trade-off to be made, haskell code in general, and algebraic data types in particular, tends to fall into the hard to change the type but easy to add functions over the type. This optimizes for (up front) well-designed, ...


13

In Scala, you'd usually use case classes to emulate the algebraic data types as found in true-blue functional languages like ML and Haskell. For example, following F# code (taken from here): type Shape = | Circle of float | EquilateralTriangle of double | Square of double | Rectangle of double * double let area myShape = match myShape with | ...



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