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5

This problem presents several challenges. My solution below is about two hundred lines long. It's probably a little longer than the assignment requires because I generalized it to any number of terms. I encourage you to study the algorithm and write your own solution. The main obstacles we must overcome are the following. How do we generate permutations ...


3

I would recommend you to use a tree structure to store the equation, i.e. a syntactic tree in which the root represents and operator having two children representing the operands and so on recursively. You would probably get a cleaner code doing it like that, because then you won't need to generate the combinations of operands "by hand", but you can make a ...


3

Obviously, there's not a lot of point solving this in RX since the answer is only deduced by examining the entire number - and for a whole bunch of other reasons it's hugely inefficient... ...but for your entertainment :), here's a very silly RX way (do not do this at home!): public int Aperture(int input) { var cs = ...


2

It is not clear why you want to restore the frequency array. As you said, the tree is all you need to decode. (You don't even need to send the tree — you can just send the number of bits for each symbol, and generate a canonical Huffman code from that.) You do not have enough information to recover the original frequency array. However you can ...


2

I don't know how to use Rx here. My solution illustrates a classic approach: private static int Aperture(int n) { int max = 0; int index = 0; int lastIndex = int.MaxValue; while (n != 0) { int bit; n = Math.DivRem(n, 2, out bit); if (bit != 0) { int length = index - lastIndex - 1; ...


2

Do I understand correctly that you want to end up with a bunch of MenuNode objects that represent the menu? If that's the case, I think it would be easier to premake all the node objects and then populate their children list. // first we make all the nodes and map them to ID Map<Long, MenuNode> nodes = hierarchies.stream() ...


2

Just remove the outer loop: int main() { cout << "Enter a row number for Pascal's Triangle: "; cin >> n; int x = 1; for (int k = 0; k <= n; k++) { cout << x << '\t'; x = x * (n - k) / (k + 1); } cout << endl; return 0; }


2

For this problem, you have to take input until EOF. But you are taking input using test case. Try this code: #include <iostream> #include <cstdio> #include <map> #define max2(a, b) ((a) > (b) ? (a) : (b)) using namespace std; map <long long , long long > C; long long f(long long n) { if (n == 0) return 0; long long r = ...


2

XOR and XNOR are commutative. This means that any re-ordering of the sequence will always yield the same result. You already know that a ^ a is zero. That's how the single number abstraction works: a ^ b ^ a equals a ^ a ^ b which equals 0 ^ b which is b. But a XNOR a is also not a function of a. It's simply a whole load of 1 bits. Therefore you can't ...


2

In fact due to the specific structure of the problem this is possible with O(1) amortized operations, which is much better than using a max-heap. An application is the sliding window minimum algorithm. Essentially you keep a second queue that contains the decreasing subsequence of all the suffix maxima: queue = new Queue() mono = new Queue() cnt = 0 def ...


1

Maybe try the following: pick some random 10 pixels from borders of selection (it is important that those are borders) get average rgb of those pixels get MAX = max color distance between pixels perform white flood fill with tolerance = k*MAX, starting from one of edge pixels this way you should be able to flood fill only the gray background in selection ...


1

Given your sample of code it should be doable by putting together a transformation that consists of a couple steps. At a high level you'd need to read the comments into a data collection that you can query, then parse the code and do a find/replace referencing the data collection. Without getting in too deep this might look like: Generate a text file of ...


1

One performance tip that I can point out is: avoid using the 'new' operator repeatedly as it is expensive. You can create a large block of memory to start with and then use it whenever you need so that you don't allocate memory in the heap repeatedly.


1

IMO when you have the frequency you can simply reconstruct the tree with the same function, for example greater or less.


1

Use next custom Validator. Header: #ifndef VALIDATOR_H #define VALIDATOR_H #include <QValidator> class Validator : public QValidator { Q_OBJECT public: explicit Validator(QObject *parent = 0); signals: public slots: public: QValidator::State validate(QString & input, int & pos) const; }; #endif // VALIDATOR_H Cpp: ...


1

Change cout << x << '\t'; to if(i == n) cout << x << '\t'; // Print only last line (i = n) And cout << endl; to if(i == n) cout << endl; // Print after only last line (i = n)


1

Isn't this just a trade off between storage and speed. So if you were willing to store a tree sorted by size whose element were pointed to by the elements in the FIFO when elements were added to the FIFO a companion element would be added to the tree sorted on size. Likewise when you deleted an element from the FIFO the element removed would also be pulled ...


1

The following is an efficient way to generate the nth row of Pascal's triangle. Start the row with 1, because there is 1 way to choose 0 elements. For the next term, multiply by n and divide by 1. That's because there are n ways to choose 1 item. For the next term, multiply by n-1 and divide by 2. There are n*(n-1) ways to choose 2 items, and 2 ways to ...


1

I have no idea what engine you are using and what's beneath its actual hood but here is some helpful information regarding this problem: Often, SQL engines uses free text search inside the column to be able to extract queries like that extra fast. This is done by creating an inverted index, that maps from each word to the "documents" (row,column) that ...


1

You want to partition your data into sequences such that the total of each sequence does not exceed some constant. Choose a starting point for the first sequence, say, 0. Greedily add elements to this sequence, then to the next sequence, and so on, until you have consumed all the data. This is one possible partition. To make another partition, start from ...


1

You can seed a random number generator with a derived value from time(): mt_srand(time() / 30 / 60); // reseed every 30 minutes echo mt_rand(0, N); Without a random number generator you can simply use modulo: echo (time() / 30 / 60) % N; Note that mt_rand() output may include N itself whereas the module version doesn't.


1

I agree that using Rx for this is silly. Using LINQ to solve the problem is equally silly, but since it is Rx's big brother, you might as well. As with James World's answer, this is for entertainment purposes only. public int Aperture(int input) { var binaryString = Convert.ToString(input, 2); // The accumulator is an integer array maintaining ...



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