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0

The answer is O(N * log N) Since you divide K in halfes you get O(log N) for outer loop. And since in each iteration you iterate N times then it will be O(N * log N).


1

In your first example, you have a variable named myVar, which has a reference to a function named func. Your function isn't renamed. In the secound example, though, you have the same variable myVar, but in this case, it's pointing to an anonymous function. The reason for choosing number one over number two is that you get better output when errors occur, ...


0

My algorithm was the same as Miljen Mikic's. The divisor counting function is determined by the prime factorisation. Starting with n=1 with 1 divisor, you can use a greedy algorithm to double the number of divisors k times. After precomputing the first k prime numbers, you can do this very quickly with a min-heap. In Python from codejamhelpers import primes ...


2

The same Fortran array can be managed as one dimensional, two dimensional, etc. It is stored in contiguous memory in any case. Let's say you have double precision x(3, 2) call somefunc (x) This can be accessed, inside somefunc, as y (6). The array elements are stored in "column major order" which means x(1, 1) is y(1) x(2, 1) is y(2) x(3, 1) is y(3) ...


2

WORK( * ) declares an assumed size array, which can be two-dimensional. See here. The compiler will not complain if you feed a one-dimensional array to the subroutine, but weird things (up to and including a segmentation fault) might happen. Better use arrays matching the specifications.


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How did you do it in O(N+M)??? I too tried Segment Tree but without lazy propagation, but it wasn't efficient, does lazy propagation help anyway?


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you can view this , this code I wrote you write a row by row. http://ideone.com/omPrSv enter code here


2

In the second else if part you need to set last instead of first - else if(obj.compareTo(array[middle]) < 0) last = middle - 1;


0

Yes, that relationship exists. Say OPT is your optimal TSP route and c(OPT) represents the cost. and removing an edge from H makes it a spanning tree (need not be MST). so c(MST) < c(OPT) If you do Inorder traversal of the MST(call this as I) and remove the repeated edges you can get a solution for TSP. (need not be optimum) Say this ...


0

You can do this: if(typeof r.lugar_exp_doc_id !== 'undefined' && typeof r.lugar_exp_doc_id !== null ){ //logic } For this, you want &&, which is and, not ||, which is or.


0

Not full answer some hints instead: the max integer divisor of n is n/2 so no need to check all divisors up to n can use prime decomposition max prime divisor is sqrt(n) so no neet ot test up to n instead test up to sqrt(n) or up to number than has half of the n bits m=(2^(ceil(ceil(log2(n))/2)+1))-1 that should speed up things a bit but you need to ...


2

You should use the formula for the number of divisors of integer n: d(n) = (a1+1)(a2+1)...(ak+1) where n = p1a1 * p2a2 *p3a3 *...*pkak is a unique representation of every integer through powers of its prime divisors. Minimum number is obviously obtained by carefully selecting powers of existing primes, or by adding new primes. Let's work through this ...


0

Some x86 ASM: mov eax, 1 mov ecx, [N] cmp ecx, 0 je exit outerloop: mov ebx, 0 mov edx, ecx innerloop: add ebx, eax dec edx jnz innerloop mov eax, ebx dec ecx jnz outerloop exit: ret N is the number to be factorial'd. No multiplication used, just addition.


0

I believe that after you use quickselest to find the k-th statictic, you will automatically find that the first k elements of the resulting array are the k smallest elements, only probably not sorted. Moreover, quickselect actually does partitioning with respect to the k-th statistics: all the elements before k-th statistic is smaller (or equal) to it, and ...


0

The highest divisor any number has, other than itself, is the half of the number. For example, 120 has a max divisor of 60 other than itself. So, you can easily reduce the range from (n+1) to (n/2). More over, for a number to have m divisors, the number must be atleast ((m-1) * 2) following the above logic (-1 because the m th number is itself). For ...


0

As already suggested, you need to classify your characters. After that's done, comparing two sets of character classifications is easy. Here is an F# sample: let areStructurallyEqual (a, b) = let charClass= function | c when Char.IsLetter(c) -> 'L' | c when Char.IsDigit(c) -> 'D' | c when Char.IsSymbol(c) -> 'S' ...


1

IMO, actually modifying quickselect is not needed. If I had an array (called arrayToSearch in this example) and I wanted the k smallest items I'd do this: int i; int k = 10; // if you wanted the 10 smallest elements int smallestItems = new Array(k); for (i = 0; i < k; i++) { smallestItems[i] = quickselect(i, arrayToSearch); } This would have a ...


1

The shortest array in your implementation is not what you think it is. It is just the list of all vertices found, not the shortest path, as (as you have notices) BFS sometimes has to follow paths that do not lead toward the target vertex. What you need to do is for each vertex v store its "parent" — the vertex where you got from to v: if (pass[i] == ...


1

You don't extract the shortest path correctly. You are adding every node you process to the shortest path. If you want to use BFS to find the shortest path, you have to keep track of the shortest path to every intermediate node by storing "back edges" and only in the end you can put them together to find the shortest path. For every node that you add to ...


1

Transform each one of your M strings into an N-dimensional vector using a vector space model like word2vec or GloVe. Then concatenate these vectors to one vector with M*N components. Optionally normalize each component to e.g. 0-1. You should then be able to run any regression (or classification) algorithm on the result, e.g. logistic regression. You might ...


1

Though not a full answer, you could do some very basic tests that will catch the examples you gave above: Prepare a list of types of characters. By this I mean to separate between upper case, lower case, digits, delimiters etc. When comparing two strings, check that the characters in the same place belong to the same group. This will give you the ...


0

You can solve this in O(N^2) where N is the number of elements in your array. let us say you have two element in your array [a1,a2] and the range is K your answer will be = > K/a1 + K/2 - K/lcm(a1,a2) // because you added them in both a1 and a2 So If you have a1,.....ax elements, your answer would be K/a1+.....K/ax - K/lcm(ai,aj) (you have to ...


0

Just in case you want some shorter code for Quicksort: static IEnumerable<int> QuickSort(IEnumerable<int> input) { if (input.ToList().Count == 0) return input; var pivot = (double)((input.First() + input.Last())/2); var left = QuickSort(input.Where(n => n < pivot)); var mid = ...


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Look up an older project I did for reference: https://github.com/mikatronix/platformer/blob/master/src/com/mikatronix/platformer/grid/Grid.as Search for the method called 'findPath' for an example implementation. Hope that helps.


1

This function seems to do the trick : var findMultiplesLength = function(arrayInput, max) { var globalMultiples = []; for (var j = 0; j < arrayInput.length; j++) { var x = arrayInput[j]; var n = max / x; for (var i=1; i < n; i++) { mult = i * x; if (globalMultiples.indexOf(mult) === -1) { ...


4

Generics in Java work only with reference types, not with primitive types. Change the running code to: Byte x[] = {2, 3, 5, 6, 1}; // or Integer Byte y = 1; // or Integer


1

This is the basic idea that I was telling you. I am inserting only the few key points. You should attach this to your code as you know best. public void findnThCombination(List<Elemento> combinazioni, int n) { ... int counter_combinations = 0; // add all different integers to the queue once. for(int i=1;i<n;++i) { ...


-1

Problem is only in ASCII - CHAR conversion This will surely work int N,k,i=0; string s; cin >> N; cin >> s; cin >> k; if(N < 1 || N > 100 || k >100 || k < 0) return 0; if(k >= 26 ) { k = k%26; } for(i=0;i<N;i++) { if(s[i] >= 65 && s[i] <= 90) { int t=(int)s[i]; t += k; ...


0

Since your question is not about path-finding in general and only about finding a path within a certain cost, I will assume you have some algorithm for finding the shortest path already and will speak in general about how to modify it. The simplest way would be to just ignore the paths which increase the cost beyond the amount you want to spend. In your ...


3

For input=250, there will be so much combinations: Look at this example: (1) {a} => {a} (3) {a,b} => {a}, {b}, {a,b} (7) {a,b,c} => {a}, {b}, {c}, {a,b}, {a,c}, {b,c}, {a,b,c} as you can see, there will be 2^n-1 elements So for input=250 - 2^250-1 = large number (1.8*10^75) Too much memory is used. I think number about 20 (1048575) will ...


1

In the part for the lowercase letters if(s[i] >= 97 && s[i] <= 122) { s[i] += k; if(s[i] > 122 ) s[i] -= 26; } you have a overflow problem (possibly). Convert the char first to something between 0 and 26, and after applying the Caesar stuff, revert it: if(s[i] >= 'a' && s[i] <= 'z') { s[i] -= 'a'; s[i] ...


0

Use flood algorithm. Rules: In each visited node update an array of paths and their prices. Release the array when the visited node is no more needed. Always remove paths with price > money. Start flood in the source node. End flood in the target node when all incoming edges are flooded. Follow flood using outgoing edges when all incoming edges are flooded. ...


1

This question is from an ongoing contest on Codechef. Please do not ask questions from ongoing contests. You could read the editorial after the contest is completed, and should remove this question now and re-ask then. Thanks.


5

This problem is NP-Hard, with a reduction from Knapsack-Problem. Short intuitive "proof": The idea is, create a graph for each item - you can either "take it" or "not take it" by choosing the vertex with the cost or the "free" vertex. Sketch: In the above you can see, from the Knapsack Problem, create a graph, for each item, you can choose to take it - ...


0

I see a few potential things wrong. You are potentially overwriting values here: n.g = currentNode.g + cost; n.f=calculateCostOfNode(n); n.parentNode =currentNode; openNodes.push(n); It should be: if n.g > currentNode.g + cost: n.g = currentNode.g + cost; n.f=calculateCostOfNode(n); ...


0

I recently thought about this too. I came up with a class member that is casted at the start of each method based on some string and if/else block. void* data; string cast; //set cast with some method, could also be enum. //make methods and/or overloads with cast blocks


1

You would need bounds for the random amount given to each winner (in sequence), so that the profit does not increase as you go down the list. Set the higher bound (non-inclusive) to the amount of money won by the previous winner, except for first place - set this to the total amount of money Set the lower bound (inclusive) to the amount of money left ...


3

Learn the basics. With $this->property you are accessing a class property, so you can access it from anther function/method. Only with $property you just have a local variable in that method, so you can't access it in another method, if you don't pass it some how.


0

Well, in functional language I would describe a rule : take a random position samples until you have n of them, where distance ex: arithmetical distance sqrt(x^2+y^2) to closest existing start point is 7. Position[{x, y}, _?(#>7&)] // Flatten Now that you have n of them, pick one. You can do this in start of the world or when ever new ...


1

My impression of this question is: Creating a local int is done during the compile phase. The argument s to f(std::string s) is runtime data. So unless you are inspecting the string during runtime and selecting a block, or a predefined template, with an int, like if ( s == "int" ){ // declare int int i; } there is no reasonable way to do this. ...


2

If user-defined types are supposed to be supported, then it's not possible without an explicit mapping provided. But for just built-in types, it can be done. You could implement a parser for type definitions and combine it with function templates, constructing the type iteratively. Something like this: template <class T> void parseType(std::string ...


1

You can create an "entering" method to recursion like this: public static int[][] perms(int[] a){ int[][] perms = new int[factorial(a.length)+1][a.length]; perms(a,perms,a.length); return perms; } Method factorial is well know method and can be found on Google for example Wondering if n parameter is neccessary EDIT it is not neccessary ...


3

Based on information given by nhahtdh in one of the other answers, some things have come to light. First, the problem you are posing is called finding "tandem repeats" or "squares". Second, the algorithm given in http://csiflabs.cs.ucdavis.edu/~gusfield/lineartime.pdf finds z tandem repeats in O(n log n + z) time and is "optimal" in the sense that there ...


1

The sketch of the algorithm by Dobkin, Edelsbrunner and Overmars goes as follows for triangles: for every point in turn, build the star-shaped polygon formed by sorting around it the points on its left. This takes N sorting operations (which can be lowered to total complexity O(N²) via an arrangement, anyway). compute the visibility graph inside this ...


1

Coming to some basic maths: lg(a/b) = lg(a) - lg(b) This is the reason why: 2(n/2)lg(n/2)+n = n( lg(n) - lg(2)) + n = n( lg(n) - 1) + n About the assumption of n/2, this assumption is the best assumption because it simplifies the induction step. In the induction step, we reach the result with ease and without any rigorous mathematical explanation. The ...


0

The simple solution to this problem is @interface ViewController () @property (nonatomic, strong) NSMutableArray *finalArray; @end @implementation ViewController - (void)viewDidLoad { [super viewDidLoad]; NSArray *input = @[@1, @[@4, @3], @6, @[@5, @[@1, @0]]]; _finalArray = [NSMutableArray array]; [self arrayToString:input]; ...


0

I am not very sure, but I guess that none of your results is equal to 90 deg is because of coordinate system. The coordinate system in which you rotate the camera by 90 deg about z axis is defined by yourself. You can imagine a camera pose as a vector pointing to the scene, and the R matrix decomposed from essential matrix denotes the rotation of the ...


0

Thanks, @mrmcgrep. I got the answer as this: Let's say we have job 1, 2, ..., n, and they have time and fine as t1, f1, t2, f2, ..., tn, fn and they are in the order of t1/f1 <= t2/f2 <= t3/f3 <= ... <= tn/fn So this is the objective schedule. Now we change 1 with m (1 < m <= n) By the original order, we need pay fine as much as: F1 = ...


1

I created a NSArray category. @interface NSArray(EXT) @property (nonatomic, assign) NSNumber *index; - (NSNumber *)next; @end static void *aIndex = &aIndex; @implementation NSArray (EXT) - (NSNumber *)index { return objc_getAssociatedObject(self, aIndex); } - (void)setIndex:(NSNumber *)index { objc_setAssociatedObject(self, aIndex, index, ...


0

You can do it using matrix inverses. Three matrix-vector multiplications (e.g. transforming three 3D vectors by a 3x3 matrix) is equivalent to multiplying two 3x3 matrices together. So, you can put your first set of points in one matrix, call it A: 0 0 1 < vector 1 0 1 0 < vector 2 2 0 0 < vector 3 Then put your second set of points in a ...



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