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6

Advantages: Reusable and Sharable, the ADT is reusable within the database it's created in, if you want it across all your DBs then create it in the model database Enforcement, the ADT will enforce the characteristics, length and nullability of it's base type, and can be used to enforce development standards Disallows implicit conversions, ADTs cannot be ...


5

I would advise against it. I support some customers who have products that use them and they are a constant PITA (pain-in-the-ankle). In particular, you cannot use them in #temp tables unless you also define them in TempDB. And as TempDB gets reset every time you restart SQL Server, that means that you also have to redefine them every time that you ...


3

I would suggest that it is always possible to refactor poor or outmoded database designs, it simply depends on how much work you are willing to go to in order to do so. If you are looking to replace the user-defined data with a surrogate key then you should be able to simply alter the existing table to contain a non-nullable identity column and this should ...


1

IMO using built in types is a huge pain in the neck. Others have already given enough reasons why. I am using C-style macros. For example, in my SQL 2000 code I had the following line in a separate file macros.h #define WIDEST_CHAR VARCHAR(8000) I would use it as follows: #include "macros.h" (snip) CREATE TABLE dbo.Comments(CommentID INT NOT NULL, ...


1

Types in general are good, but our project uses it limited, so I can answer #2 The problem is"altering". We developed type TUrl as varchar(255), but after some time we have tried to change to varchar(800). For working database it is impossible. I don't know any other disadvantages of using alias data types.



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