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4

No, you don't always need a loop. int (*array)[M] = malloc( sizeof *array * N ); The code above declares array as a pointer to an M-element array of int, then allocates enough space for N instances of that array type, giving us storage for an N by M array of int. If the size of M is not known at compile time, then array is a variable-length array, ...


3

TL;DR, you are trying to use the wrong container. The allocator is responsible for the allocation, deallocation etc. of the memory as required by the container. It is the responsibility of the container to implement the required semantics and it uses the allocators to assist it in doing so. std::vector is probably not the best choice for the cache you ...


3

You have two ways of doing it that are both used in practice: Write a function that allocates the matrix and returns the result - your function would have the following signature: int **alloc_matrix(size_t rows, size_t columns) Write a function that takes a pointer to matrix pointer, and returns a status code - the signature would be int alloc_matrix(int***...


2

Why are you deleting arr2 from memoryManagement? You should not, as that's apparently your new class attribute (you did arr = arr2): But that's not enough (your program will then start throwing exception upon push....because you also forgot to modify your capacity attribute. Here is your working memoryManagement function: void Stack::memoryManagement(int a)...


2

Compilers may indeed reserve additional memory for themselves. Gcc has a flag, -mpreferred-stack-boundary, to set the alignment it will maintain. According to the documentation, the default is 4, which should produce 16-byte alignment, which needed for SSE instructions. As VermillionAzure noted in a comment, you should provide your gcc version and compile-...


2

You need to change words = realloc(words, ++wordcnt); to words = realloc(words, ++wordcnt * sizeof(*words)); Otherwise you are not allocating enough memory. words[wordcnt] = malloc(MAX); This also is not correct, you should access words[wordcnt-1].


2

You can try changing the GCSettings latency mode to SustainedLowLatency which will avoid garbage collection at all unless the system will run out. GCSettings.LatencyMode = GCLatencyMode.SustainedLowLatency;


1

You are probably running into the limit that you see because you are running your memory hog as a 32-bit process, which can only address ~4GB of memory. Try running as a 64-bit process (compile for x64 explicitly), or spawning multiple copies. That said, there are better ways to limit the memory available to the process under test. One example is given ...


1

A possible cause is that the first object was allocated in the process's initial data segment, but by the time you allocated the second object this filled up. Traditional memory allocators use sbrk() to extend the data segment, but some modern memory allocators make use of mmap() on /dev/zero to create new memory segments. This might allocate its virtual ...


1

I found a sollution: cache needs to be stopped: stopCache demoCache /s 127.0.0.1 open the config file for the server with as admin: C:\Program Files\NCache\config\config.ncconf update the memory allocation according to your needs, cache-config node: type="heap" cache-size="2048mb" start the cache back.


1

You are using realloc but you're not saving its return value anywhere. This means the pointers you have still point to the memory that was freed and the newly allocated memory is leaked. Look at the working function and you'll see how to use it properly.


1

One thing to realize when reallocating a double-pointer is that the size of type to realloc is always the sizeof (a pointer). It will be the same on any given system no matter the data type at issue. You can generically reallocate a double-pointer as follows: /** realloc array of pointers ('memptr') to twice current * number of pointer ('*nptrs'). Note: '...


1

Yes you will have a new memory allocation every iteration, you can do like this to avoid multiple memory alloc ArrayList <Integer> al = null; //make the declaration outside the method public void method{ if (al == null){ al= new ArrayList<>(); }else{ al.clear();} //do smthing with you're arrayList here }


1

Because you haven't enabled optimization. Without optimization, the compiler makes no attempt to minimize the amount of space or time it needs for anything in the generated code -- it just generates code in the most straight-forward way possible. Add -O2 (or even just -O1) or -Os if you want the compiler to produce decent code.


1

There are two different common ways to create a 2D array in C. If the inner dimension is fixed (i.e., known at compile time), you can declare it as an array of those fixed-size arrays, and then just allocate one big blob of memory. If you don't, then you have to allocate an array of pointers to rows, then do a loop allocating each row.


1

Your copy constructor isn't copying anything - and specifically isn't copying the base class. The simplest fix would be to omit it (and the default constructor), since the compiler-generated versions will do the right thing. Failing that you can explicitly copy the base: SecureString(const SecureString &other) throw() : allocator(other) {}


1

This is what I got from the warning message (copy-construct the base, too): SecureString(SecureString const& other) throw() : std::allocator<T>(other) {} Better leave it up do default if you don't plan to do anything useful there: SecureString(SecureString const&) throw() = default; And consider dumping the throw() exception specification....


1

A std::deque does not move elements once added, so iterators and references are stable as long as you don't delete the referenced element. Like std::vector, std::deque offers random access iterators. Random access into a deque is a little slower than std::vector, but still O(1). If you need stable references, the slight slow-down is probably acceptable. ...


1

The first part of your question is wrong. You say NSNumber *number = [NSNumber numberWithInteger:1] Does not allocate memory. Of course it does. That method is a "convenience method". It is a class method that internally allocates and initializes an object. NSNumber is a special case however. Internally, the system does some special handling of ...


1

Creating lots of storyboards objects is not a bad practice, until you really need them. Also, It might not be as huge as you expect it. When storyboard is instantiated, its just the story board that has been instantiated, none of the scenes will be allocated memory until you do so using - (__kindof UIViewController *)instantiateViewControllerWithIdentifier:...


1

Use RAII for resource management: std::vector<std::vector<double>> samplesContainer(M, std::vector<double>(N)); then for compatibility std::vector<double*> ptrs(M); for (std::size_t i = 0; i != M; ++i) { ptrs[i] = samplesContainer[i].data(); } And so pass ptrs.data() for double**.


1

The old fashioned way of initializing a pointer to a pointer, is correctly enough with the new operator, you would first initialize the the first array which is a pointer to doubles (double*), then you would iterate through that allocating the next pointer to doubles (double*). double** pSamples = new double*[N]; for (int i = 0; i < N; ++i) { ...


1

Memory layout There's no benefit in moving .NET objects to random positions in memory, due to the internal structure of lists in .NET. In fact, your objects may already be at "random" addresses and the garbage collector may change that at any time (based on memory needs, not due to sorting of lists). The only exception to that are arrays, which are ...


1

What are you trying to achieve by this? If it is security, then you could encrypt your data/properties, or maybe the use of SecureStrings is enough. GC is all about optimizing memory, not fragment it (which is effectively what you are asking for).


1

You can pre-allocate a few ways: Use empty cell arrays when creating the struct that are the size that you want the array of structs to be. mystruct = struct('field1', cell(N_data, 1), ... 'field2', cell(N_data, 1), ... 'field3', cell(N_data, 1), ... 'field4', cell(N_data, 1)); Simply assign the "last"...



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