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19

There are two issues with using altitude of a smartphone / tablet GPS: The altitude is the altitude above the WGS84 reference ellipsoid. It is not the altitude above ground level or sea level. Here is more detail on that: http://www.gpspassion.com/forumsen/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=10915. This error can be corrected; here is a description how to do that by hand: ...


13

You need to build against the highest api you require and then code alternate code paths conditionally for other levels you want to support To check current API level at execution time, the latest recommendation from the Android docs is to do something like this: if(Build.VERSION.SDK_INT < Build.VERSION_CODES.GINGERBREAD) { ... Once ...


12

The elevation derived from GPS satellites is inherently less accurate that the horizontal solution from GPS due to the geometry of the satellites. You should expect the vertical accuracy to be usually about 1.5 to 3 times worse than the horizontal accuracy. That's just a limitation of GPS and why aviation requires WAAS correction before you can use GPS for ...


9

As DWin said, there are two parts to this: find a good source of data with a web service, then parse it in R. This answer uses the earthtools.org service. library(RCurl) library(XML) latitude <- 52.4822 longitude <- -1.8946 url <- paste( "http://www.earthtools.org/height", latitude, longitude, sep = "/" ) page <- getURL(url) ...


7

Or you can use the package that looks up from geonames, and get the value from the srtm3 digital elevation model: > require(geonames) > GNsrtm3(54.481084,-3.220625) srtm3 lng lat 1 797 -3.220625 54.48108 or the gtopo30 model: > GNgtopo30(54.481084,-3.220625) gtopo30 lng lat 1 520 -3.220625 54.48108 geonames is ...


6

If you're using startMonitoringSignificantLocationChanges, which was a feature new to iOS 4.0, then you will not get altitude updates. This low-power mode only uses cell towers to figure out a user's location, and this method not report altitude. More generally, the iPhone has three ways of figuring out your location -- cell towers, wi-fi, and GPS. You will ...


6

You can call the method using reflection and fail gracefully in case of errors (like missing class or methods). See java.lang.reflect Other option is to compile code in level 9 but surround with try/catch to catch errors that would arise from execution on lower level. It could be fairly error prone, though, and I'd think twice about doing it. Update ...


5

You can take advantage of how class isn't loaded until it is accessed for an easy work around that doesn't require reflection. You use an inner class with static methods to use your new apis. Here is a simple example. public static String getEmail(Context context){ try{ if(Build.VERSION.SDK_INT > 4) return ...


5

There's an Elevation API provided by Google, which returns either a JSON or XML response. Here's an example using a JSON response, parsed by fromJSON in the RJSONIO package. googEl <- function(locs) { require(RJSONIO) locstring <- paste(do.call(paste, list(locs[, 2], locs[, 1], sep=',')), collapse='|') u <- ...


4

The answers to all three of your questions are yes. The altitude you get from GPS is the height above the WGS84 ellipsoid in metres, which is an approximation of the earth's surface. I know that because I've been developing Android software to use it. A correction has to be applied to convert the figure to height above mean sea level, or altitude as it is ...


4

Short of seeing the code which produces these values, there's not much I can offer beyond general knowledge. GPS altitudes generally use a geodetic model for an idealised sea level (the zero altitude), basically mapping an ellipsoid onto a less-than-perfectly-shaped planet (which varies anyway with things such as lunar tidal forces). See WGS84 here for more ...


4

No, it is not possible to derive elevation from altitude or longitude or latitude or any combination of those things.


3

It's not quite that simple -- the Android API has either changed or has bugs. I have two Android devices -- a 'generic' phone (Android 2.3.6) and a Nexus 7 (Android 4.x). On the phone, getAltitude() gives an answer consistent with my actual altitude AMSL (i.e., corrected for geoid). On the Nexus 7, the altitude returned is uncorrected. The documentation ...


3

Well, altitude in context of GPS coordinates represents your elevation according to the sea level. So I assume your current position is just below the sea level. Yeah, this is possible ;)


3

try List<Sensor> sensors = sensorManager.getSensorList(Sensor.TYPE_PRESSURE); if(sensors.size() > 0) { sensor = sensors.get(0); mSensorManager.registerListener(this, sensor, SensorManager.SENSOR_DELAY_NORMAL); } public void onAccuracyChanged(Sensor sensor, int accuracy) { } public void onSensorChanged(SensorEvent event) { presure ...


2

What code have you tried? This is the best code for elevation so I don't think there is anything beyond this: -(void)awakeFromNib { locmanager = [[CLLocationManager alloc] init]; [locmanager setDelegate:self]; [locmanager setDesiredAccuracy:kCLLocationAccuracyBest]; [locmanager startUpdatingLocation]; } - (void)locationManager:(CLLocationManager ...


2

If you are indoor, iPhone uses cell tower, or WIFI location. These location will not return altitude. You have to test outdoor to get GPS. To make sure that you are using GPS, check the horizontal accuracy as well. If it is in the range of 2 digits, you should be on GPS, and most likely you will get altitude reading


2

To answer your original question: GPS will always be used if you set desiredAccuracy to Best or BestForNavigation, and distanceFilter to kCLDistanceFilterNone when configuring the CLLocationManager. You will then also get altitude values in the CLLocation event. However, it takes a short while before the GPS has "locked in" to enough satelites to be able to ...


2

The fact that observer includes "temp=15.0C pressure=1010.0mBar" implies that the calculation will include refraction. You want to turn off refraction as described in the help: These apparent positions include an adjustment to simulate atmospheric refraction for the observer’s temp and presure; set the observer’s pressure to zero to ignore ...


2

Did you check if this is device specific? Are you working in an emulator? I would at first check, if your device supports the altitude determination with: LocationManager locationManager; LocationProvider locationProvider; /* Get LocationManager and LocationProvider for GPS */ locationManager = (LocationManager) getSystemService(LOCATION_SERVICE); ...


2

Astronomy software predicts the location of the Sun by taking JPL predictions of where the Earth and Sun will be, which the JPL expresses as a series of polynomials that cover specific ranges of dates. Asking “when will the sun be at azimuth z?” is asking when three different polynomials, that are each varying at a different rate (the polynomial for the Sun, ...


2

The only altitude I see in the API response (below) is nested under the <sun> element, not <moon>. The API documentation you linked to refers to it as: The angle to the sun at solar noon is also given. So what this <noon altitude="50.0496753501172" /> really means is that, at noon, the sun will be about 50 degrees above the horizon. ...


2

Am into this Elevation API recently So if am in right track what you get as 88 meter is the height of ground(where your building is) to sea level difference not the height from ground to second floor. you could use getAltitude() method for this but it gives you height from ellipsoid not from sea level and also it not much accurate you may have to do some ...


2

There is ?getData for SRTM elevation in the raster package. For example: library(raster) m <- data.frame(lon = c(146.9442, 146.4622), lat = c(-36.0736, -36.0491)) x <- getData('alt', country = "AUS") cbind(m, alt = extract(x, m)) lon lat alt 1 146.9442 -36.0736 164 2 146.4622 -36.0491 172 Use interpolation into the cell rather than ...


1

As you mentioned, GPS returns the altitude as an offset from the WGS84 reference ellipsoid, but most people want to see mean sea level (MSL), and the two frequently don't agree. The way this is most frequently done is by looking up the delta in a table and using that to compute MSL based on the height from GPS and the delta in the table. There's some java ...


1

The C library underlying PyEphem does not have any way to turn off deflection, aberration, or nutation — maybe because Nature does not let us turn those effects off either, but I am not sure! It does not, I will note, do those calculations for an earth-orbiting satellite, but I can't think of an easy way for you to put a satellite at an exact RA and dec ...


1

You wanted to enter : RA = 16 h 41.7 min but you entered: star._ra = '16:41.42.0' instead of star._ra = '16:41:42.0'


1

There is no altitude or similar returned by a CLLocationManager. What you need is CMMotionManager. Start a timer with the readout frequency of your choice and read the attitude of your CMMotionManager. Remember to create only one instance of CMMotionManager. The CMAttitude object has a property called pitch which gives you the rotation around a lateral ...


1

I know it's late but for anyone looking for it, that might help import android.app.Activity; import android.hardware.Sensor; import android.hardware.SensorEvent; import android.hardware.SensorEventListener; import android.hardware.SensorManager; import android.os.Bundle; public class MyActivity extends Activity implements SensorEventListener { private ...


1

Errors in the altitude may well not be down to the GPS and geoid altitude separation. The altitude value returned by any GPS receiver is always the least accurate value. I have often seen my office building report that it is moving in altitude between -200 and +750 metres. One fundamental reason is that it is impossible to get an even spread of satellites ...



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