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17

SSH port forwarding should do the trick. Try running this from you client. ssh -f -N -L6379:<your redis node endpoint>:6379 <your EC2 node that you use to connect to redis> Then from your client redis-cli -h 127.0.0.1 -p 6379 It works for me. Please note that default port for redis is 6379 not 6739. An also make sure you allow the allow ...


17

No, you can't without resorting to 'tricks' such as a tunnel, which maybe OK for testing but will kill any real benefit of using a super-fast cache with the added latency/overhead. ...an Amazon ElastiCache Cluster, inside or outside a VPC, is never allowed to be accessed from the Internet. From here: ...


13

EDIT: New AWS Feature as of 4/24/2014 Amazon has added internal backup support as of 4/24. This allows you to snapshot redis data daily and restore it to an ElastiCache cluster. It does not allow exporting/downloading at the present. The solution below is still required if you want to keep your own archives/backups of redis data. Most people should be ...


8

Yes, we were able to configure hibernate with 2nd level cache.. Not with beanstalk though.. This code should help you with it. <props> <prop key="hibernate.dialect">org.hibernate.dialect.MySQLDialect</prop> <prop key="hibernate.show_sql">false</prop> <prop ...


8

Since I'm lazy, I'd choose Elasticcache over EC2 so that I can avoid some of the operational aspects of managing a Redis instance. With Redis on EC2, you are responsible for scaling, updating, monitoring, and maintenance of the host and the Redis instance. If you're fine dealing with the operational aspects of Redis, then it shouldn't be a problem. A lot of ...


7

Yes, this is a common use case. You can connect directly to redis without using the SDK. Just make sure you have configured the security group correctly to allow access from your app server.


6

You are right that multi availability zones feature is not supported yet in ElasticCache. However it is usually not a big problem with the low latency of 1ms between AZs. The purpose of cache is to make long and frequent SQL queries served from memory. That is instead of 300ms SQL query you can serve it with a single memory lookup. Compared to that 1ms ...


6

According to the AWS team response to Not able to get cache nodes from ElastiCache cluster you'll need to use optional ShowDetails flag to obtain CacheNodes Information via the Class DescribeCacheClustersRequest parameter of method describeCacheClusters(). Looking closer there is no ShowDetails flag though, despite being documented for this class indeed: ...


6

You can't just "turn on" memcache. You need to write code that interacts with memcache, such that your database query results are cached in memcache. Take a look at this users guide -- I think it will give you a good idea for how memcache is used: http://www.memcachier.com/documentation/memcache-user-guide/


6

No, it isn't recommended you use Elasticache as there is no authentication mechanism with it. As such, anyone can access your cache! This is normally fine as you would use AWS security rules to restrict what machines can access it to yours. However, this obviously doesn't work with Heroku since your app is run on a randomly chosen machine of Herokus. You ...


6

I would say that if Redis is an effective caching solution for you, then ElasticCache will work for you - you're simply paying AWS to manage the back end and plumbing for you. Performance may be marginally slower - you have to have a DNS lookup for requests, vs having redis running in a VPC where you can access a private IP address directly - but even ...


6

You can configure eviction time by providing expires map in RedisCacheManager. For example you have cacheable method specified like that: @Cacheable(value = "customerCache", key = "#id") public Customer findOne(Integer id) { return customerRepository.findOne(id); } in your applicationContext.xml it will look like this: <bean id="cacheManager" ...


5

You should increase the sessionBackupTimeout of memcached-session-manager, from the documentation: sessionBackupTimeout (optional, default 100) The timeout in milliseconds after that a session backup is considered as beeing failed. This property is only evaluated if sessions are stored synchronously (set via sessionBackupAsync). The default ...


5

No, it's not bad/complex--that's a pretty standard usage of memcache as a write-through cache of a persistent data store. However, it's a really expensive solution from monthly AWS billing perspective. Have you benchmarked using just DynamoDB at all? It's an SSD-backed key-value store that ought to be plenty fast enough. I say "ought to" though, ...


5

Elasticache feels more like a cache solution in the memcached sense of the word, meaning that to scale up, you would indeed fire up a new cluster and switch your application over to it. Performance will degrade for a moment because the cache would have to be rebuilt, but nothing more. For many people (I suspect you included), however, Redis is more of a ...


4

You workaround is a reasonable one (and shows that you seem to be in control of your AWS operations already). You could improve on your custom solution eventually by means of the dedicated CustomResource type, which are special AWS CloudFormation resources that provide a way for a template developer to include resources in an AWS CloudFormation stack that ...


4

To add to what jamieb said, here are some links: If you are going to use ElastiCache, I suggest using their auto-discovery feature so you only have to worry about one memcache endpoint regardless of how many cache nodes there actually are. If you are going to use DynamoDB, you should use the DynamoDB Session Handler provided by the AWS SDK for PHP. Here is ...


4

Note: While this does work, @btucker pointed out that it allows any Heroku-hosted app to access your ElastiCache cluster. I do not recommend using this solution. Yes you can. The setup is similar to the guide Heroku has on Amazon RDS. The steps that differ go like this: Follow the "Get Started with Amazon ElastiCache" guide to create a cache cluster and ...


4

To expand on @RohitChatterjee's comment here is the full quote from AWS docs at http://docs.aws.amazon.com/AmazonElastiCache/latest/UserGuide/GettingStarted.AuthorizeAccess.html "All ElastiCache clusters can only be accessed from an Amazon EC2 instance. A cluster and its related Amazon EC2 instance must be in the same Amazon Virtual Private Cloud (VPC). If ...


3

No need to combine ElasticCache and DynamoDB. Just use PHP session handler over Redis. It is very fast, stable and data is backed to disk by default.


3

Implemented my own telnet test with fsockopen and a one second timeout. Answering my own question yet again


3

Ok, for me, the problem was the security groups. You can only access Elasticache nodes from ec2 instances that have a security group that is listed in the Elasticache security group. So for me, my ec2 instance has a security group of "web". In elasticache, I then added "web" to the "default" elasticache security group. Further explanation here: ...


3

Take a look at dalli-elasticache.


3

The module is not installed by default in Beanstalk nor any EC2 instances. You have to do this yourself. This also is something completely different than creating a resource. You can do one without the other. The ElastiCache Cluster Client for PHP is an extension that you can install via pecl on your instances. You can do this manually but if the instance ...


3

According to Amazon, there is no accessing elasticache clusters from outside AWS: ...an Amazon ElastiCache Cluster, inside or outside a VPC, is never allowed to be accessed from the Internet. From http://aws.amazon.com/elasticache/faqs/#Can_I_access_Amazon_ElastiCache_from_outside_AWS Also see this question: Can you connect to Amazon Elasticache ...


3

In short It depends. Explanation You can connect to Redis Cluster nodes without command dispatching to other nodes. You just should make sure, that you access keys that are handled by the node. If you are connecting to a slave make sure, that your connection is in READONLY mode, otherwise the slave will respond with MOVED. There are plenty of Java-based ...


2

Where are you executing this? From with in a EC2 instance or from an external network. Remember that ElastiCache servers are bound by the security group which restricts the access to the ElastiCAche instances. So checkout the security group and other configurations that allow you to connect to the Memcached server. as far as I know, ElastiCache cannot be ...


2

You need to create elasticache node (AWS Management Console), to which you can connect via memcache client, take a look at the Getting started guide. If you want to control your cache nodes with your code then you should use Elasticache SDK. $memcache->connect('myfirstcacheinstance.evdfes.0001.use1.cache.amazonaws.com', 11211); You don't need memcache ...


2

Your problem is that you are setting the endpoint to the EC2 endpoint not the Amazon ElastiCache endpoint. The corrected code snippet is: elasticache.setEndpoint("elasticache.us-west-1.amazonaws.com"); You can find a complete list of endpoints in this document


2

It's worth noting that while @ssorallen's answer above will work as described, it also allows ANY heroku-deployed app to access your memcached server. So if you store anything at all confidential, or you're concerned about other people making use of your ElatiCache cluster, don't do it. In the context of RDS you have the access control built into the ...



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