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6

It sounds like you are interested in a short term smoothed RMS amplitude measurement. Usually to do this you take a rectified version of the input signal, and then apply a low pass filter to this, e.g. x1 = abs(x); // x2 = rectified input signal x2 = k * x2 + (1 - k) * x1; // simple single pole low pass recursive filter x2 is the amplitude of the signal ...


6

If you double all the sample values it will sure sound "twice as loud", that is, 6dB louder. Of course, you need to be careful to avoid distortion due to clipping - that's the main reason why all professional audio processing software today uses float samples internally. You may need to get back to integer when finally outputting the sound data. If you're ...


5

Henry is right on the non-normalization part, but there is a little more to it, because you are using rfft, not fft. The following is consistent with his answer: >>> x = np.linspace(0, 2 * np.pi, 128) >>> y = 1 - np.sin(x) >>> fft = np.fft.fft(y) >>> np.mean((fft * fft.conj()).real) 191.49999999999991 >>> ...


4

Unfortunately i don't think you'll be able to use C# to do this - AFAIK, there is no JIT compiler for it. I remember reading about something for Mono, which would make it available to use with C#, but i'm not sure right now. That said - i would go with c++. If you go that way, you can make use of a vast amount of audio analysis libraries, like CLAM ...


4

First you need to divide the problem to real-time playback and non-linear amplitude, etc. access. For real-time playback you can use Web Audio API https://dvcs.w3.org/hg/audio/raw-file/tip/webaudio/specification.html Example for beats https://beatdetektor.svn.sourceforge.net/svnroot/beatdetektor/trunk/core/js/beatdetektor.js For non-linear, ...


4

You are using 0.001 as time step. You are building the sine of (2*pi*500*t). This results in : 2*pi*500/1000=pi, 2*pi*500*2/1000=2pi, 2*pi*500*3/1000 =3pi, ... As values for your first 3 data points. THis would continue til the end. As Luis Mendo said in his comment, within numerical accuracy those values are 0. This is just not useful. Change your ...


3

What you are asking to do is extremely difficult. Step one would be to convert your audio from a time domain to a frequency domain. That is, you take a number of samples, and do a Fourier transform (implemented in your software as FFT). Next, you begin deciding what you call a note or not. This is as not as simple as picking out the loudest of the ...


3

The default Python wave module isn't very thorough. You might try the one included in scipy as an alternative. Check out: How to read *.wav file in Python? If you're going to do any numerical heavy lifting with the audio, scipy might be your best option anyway.


3

Do you mean getting all the individual samples as text? SoX can do that. $ sox file.wav file.dat will take an audio file file.wav, and generate a text file file.dat with a column for the timebase in seconds, and a column for each audio channel scaled by the maximum possible value.


3

double amplitudeDb = 20 * Math.log10(Math.abs(amplitude) / 32768); I think maybe the problem is from Math.abs(amplitude) / 32768, amplitude is integer, so Math.abs(amplitude) will also return integer, as Math.abs(amplitude) is less than 32768 (perhaps I am not correct, byte is maximum 2^7 - 1, can here amplitude bigger than 32768? ). So Math.abs(amplitude) ...


2

If you have a closer look at the computeSpectrum() documentation, you will see the second parameter sets the FFT mode. FFT stands for FastFourierTransform, basically if you use FFT over a waveform you go to the frequency domain which means instead of raw values, you have values that are sorted for you by frequency. All you need to change in your code is : ...


2

A couple of programming changes, first of all: xAxis += pieSteps; if (xAxis >= fullSinWave) xAxis -= fullSinWave; //wrap x back into 0-2pi period will help reduce numeric error. in_buf[i].r = dataStream[i]; in_buf[i].i = 0; will set the input buffer to sin(x), previously you had it set to sin(x) + j*sin(x), where j = sqrt(-1). Moving wantedHz = ...


2

Typically for a simple modulation scheme you would use FSK, with two suitably chosen frequencies. You're unlikely to be able to do this ultrasonically though, for various reasons, and your data rate will also be quite low. Since your transmission channel will be noisy you will definitely need some robust error checking/correction. Note that the above ...


2

If you allow gstreamer, here is a little script that could do the trick. It accept any audio file that gstreamer can handle. Construct a gstreamer pipeline, use audioconvert to reduce the channels to 1, and use level module to get peaks Run the pipeline until EOS is hit Normalize the peaks from the min/max found. Snippet: import os, sys, pygst ...


2

You basically want a spectrogram. To get you started, go through your sound file in small chunks, where each chunk is, say, 1/10th of a second, and FFT each of these chunks. (Then, of course, to look up 5000ms and 440Hz, go to the FFT of the appropriate chunk.)


2

Amplitude and frequency are no free variables in the Perlin Noise generation. Instead they are parametrized by something called persistence. The noise function is then the sum over several basic functions. n(x) = sum( n_i(x*f_i) * a_i, i=0..N-1) Each function is called octave and therefore numbered by the index i. The values f_i denote the frequencies ...


2

i think that is the correct formula. amp_ref is reference amplitude


2

Use setOutoutFile(getExternalFilesDir().getAbsolutePath() + "/newRecording") Make sure you have this permission in your manifest <uses-permission android:name="android.permission.WRITE_EXTERNAL_STORAGE" /> Don't do the busy-wait loop. Use a timer. Don't ignore exceptions in prepare.


2

Your FFT result bins represent the same set of frequencies in every FFT, as in your example #1, but for different slices of time. Each FFT will allow you to plot magnitude vs. frequency for about a 12 mS window of time. You could also vector sum the FFT magnitudes together to get a Welch method PSD (power spectral density) for a longer time frame.


2

This code is not tested but this is roughly what you should do : File fileIn = new File("C:\\path\\to\\your\\file.wav"); AudioInputStream audioInputStream = AudioSystem.getAudioInputStream(fileIn); int size = audioInputStream.available(); byte[] b = new byte[size]; if (size == audioInputStream.read(b)) { // Do what you have to do }


2

I have been fighting with this library too, and this code could help you to test. It´s a mixing of code that I read in Internet to see if It could be interesting to include in a project. Works Fine. It writes a file with the waveform and values of the original signal, FFT and the inverse FFT too just to test. It was compiled with VS2010 #include ...


2

The problem you describe here is one of music/audio feature extraction and a substantial body of academic work exists that you can draw on. Another useful term of art with which to search is Music Information Retrieval (MIR). The list of 'features' that researchers have attempted to retrieve from recordings is large and varied, from deterministic things ...


2

Looking at the Snack Sound Toolkit examples, there seems to be a dbPowerSpectrum function. From the reference: dBPowerSpectrum ( ) Computes the log FFT power spectrum of the sound (at the sample number given in the start option) and returns a list of dB values. See the section item for a description of the rest of the options. Optionally an ending ...


2

In most FFT libraries, the various DFT flavours are not orthogonal. The numpy.fft library applies the necessary normalizations only during the inverse transform. Consider the Wikipedia description of the DFT; the inverse DFT has the 1/N term that the DFT does not have (in which N is the length of the transform). To make an orthogonal version of the DFT, you ...


2

If you simply want to record the "volume" of the microphone, then you could redirect output to null, like this: recorder = new MediaRecorder(); // following calls throw Illegal State Exceptions, but here we follow the proper order recorder.setAudioSource(AudioSource.MIC); // After set audio source recorder.setOutputFormat(OutputFormat.THREE_GPP); // ...


2

A DC offset is a frequency component at 0 Hz. The "wandering DC offset" will be made of very low frequency components, so you should be able to remove this by using a high-pass filter with a cutoff of around 15 Hz. That way, you'll remove any sub-sonic DC related stuff without altering the audible frequency range. Use a filter with a steep rolloff. Seeing ...


2

This is a combination of two equations: 1: Finding the magnitude of a complex number (the result of an FFT at a particular bin) - the equation for which is m = sqrt(r^2 + i ^2) 2: Calculating relative power in decibels from an amplitude value - the equation for which is p =10 * log10(A^2/Aref^2) == 20 log10(A/Aref) where Aref is a some reference value. ...


2

This was done very quickly, so the math might be messed up. But hopefully it'll get you started... var ac = new webkitAudioContext(), url = 'path/to/audio.mp3'; function fetchAudio( url, callback ) { var xhr = new XMLHttpRequest(); xhr.open('GET', url, true); xhr.responseType = 'arraybuffer'; xhr.onload = function() { callback(xhr.response); ...


1

Aubio is a C/C++ library that does pitch tracking, onset detection and bpm tracking, among other things. As for "extracting the amplitude of the waveform", the waveform is amplitude, i.e., you could just pick the audio sample with the greatest absolute value every n samples and use that value to do the "amplitude" part of the visualization. Here's some ...


1

First, you need to put your record in a place where you are allowed to write. File parent = getContext().getFilesDir(); File recordFile = new File(parent, "newRecording"); is a correct start. (there are other)



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