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119

Did you enable AnkhSVN in Tools->Options->Source Control? When it is the default SCC provider it should automatically detect that your (C# ?) website project is already in Subversion.


51

It is there. Just change the source control options in visual studio to use Ankh instead of TFS. Go to Tools/Options/Source Control/Plug-in Selection, select the AnkhSVN plug-in. Then restart visual studio and you are good to go. Its working perfectly for me. Or reinstall the complete ankhsvn client. As this guy here: AnkhSVN settings menus not showing ...


48

I used VisualSVN until Ankh hit 2.0, and ever since, I've abandoned VisualSVN. Ankh has surpassed VisualSVN in functionality, in my mind, and all the 1.x perf and integration issues are gone.


43

That happens when svn encounters a conflict: You changed a file, the file on the server was changed and it cannot (easily) be merged automatically. You need to decide what is the correct solution now. Subversion just adds the diff into your source file (and creates files next to it, called OriginalName.mine (unchanged) and OriginalName.rsomething ...


32

In VS2012 Go to Tools -> Options... -> Source Control -> Plug-In Selection -> complement choice AnkhSVN - Subversion Support for Visual Studio (In the Current Source control plug-in Drop Down List Select this option) then it will work.


31

Found it. To clear the cached username/passwords you can go to: Tools > Options > Source Control > Subversion Environment > Authentication Cache


31

SVN, as opposed to the dreaded VSS, does not clutter your project files with its "bindings": it keeps all its system information in .svn or _svn subfolders inside every version-controlled directory. Thus, "removing" version control from a project effectively means deleting all these folders. This is tedious, however, so SVN has a special command called svn ...


30

There's a switch/relocate built-in: Open View -> Pending Changes Click the dropdown that shows the current repository url, or the button to the right of that Enter / browse to the new location A dialog comes up wether you want to relocate (because switching isn't enough here)


23

You may be interested in reading this NuGet doc: Using NuGet without committing packages to source control


21

I wouldn't say it's a "known issue", because it's not an issue in AnkhSVN in the first place: First off all, when you commit the "new" files, they're added just in time for the commit. The reason for the "new" status vs the "added" status, is that it makes it easier/cheaper to do renames/moves, something that's very common for new files. When you go to ...


21

Older AnkhSVN (pre 2.0) was very crappy and I was only using it for shiny icons in the solution explorer. I relied on Tortoise for everything except reverts. The newer Ankh is a complete rewrite (it is now using the Source Control API of the IDE) and looks & works much better. Still, I haven't forced it to any heavy lifting. Icons is enough for me. The ...


21

I've used AnkhSVN for the past year and I've never had a problem with it. I switch between that and TFS and some of the times I think I prefer AnkhSVN to TFS.


21

Granted, it has been a year since I've used each product head-to-head, but my current preference is AnkhSVN. Though folks grumbled about early versions of AnkhSVN, 2.0 was a near rewrite of the original and is now a full Source Control Provider Integration Package rather than a Visual Studio Add-In. With commercial backing from CollabNet and renewed open ...


20

I noticed this too a couple of days ago. This happened because Tortoise converted your working copy to 1.6 version and Ankh doesn't know how to read it. The solution is simple: I installed the latest daily build of Ankh (http://ankhsvn.open.collab.net/daily/) and now everything works like a charm.


20

This works more or less the same for all SCC Providers: Go to File -> Subversion -> Change Source Control. Use this to disconnect the solution (this is to avoid auto-reloading AnkhSVN the next time you open the solution). Go to Tools -> Options -> Source Control. Select None (or a different SCC Provider)


20

Subversion 1.7 switched to a single-folder structure, like many DVCSes (git, bazaar, etc.) - the only .svn folder is in the root folder now, and this contains all of the info for the checkout. You should now be able to simply copy the folder and check it in.


19

Keeping your branch up to do date with the latest trunk check-ins is called a merge. I know merging can be a royal nightmare sometimes, but this is precisely what merging is.


18

Ankh was recently upgraded to SVN 1.8 - probably your Tortoise or Command Line svn are not yet. Update to the latest SVN version, and using that, upgrade your working copy to SVN 1.8 repo format. That'll make the message go away!


16

When subversion updates a file it first creates a temporary version in .svn/tmp/. It then moves the file into the right location. (This to avoid corruptions) In 1.6 it did this for every directory by itself, but in 1.7 there is just a .svn in the top level directory of your working copy. If somehow the filesystem permissions of this .svn directory are ...


16

AnkhSVN apparently cannot be disabled or uninstalled from within Visual Studio 2012. Do the following instead: Close all instances of Visual Studio. Run the AnkhSVN uninstaller. Note: I ran the uninstaller in Revo Uninstaller, and there were no left-over artifacts (files, registry entries). After uninstalling AnkhSVN, you may find that some of your ...


16

TL;DR; No you must merge, here's some instructions It's not as bad as you think it is. I will outline the steps from the commandline that I use. I will be using vimidiff to manage the conflicts you can use Meld or someother diff tool that you like. Commands are preceded by the hash '#' mark <in branch first time from copy> # svn log --stop-on-copy ...


15

I use VisualSVN and it works great, but you're correct, it's not free. No experience with Ankh here.


15

We did precisely that: switched from VisualSVN to AnkhSVN. The move went without any trouble at all. These plugins do not store specific information, and the .svn (or _svn) hidden folders are compatible with any svn client. The 1.x series of the Ankh plugin was awful: lots of crashes and annoyances (for example, it was very hard to move or rename a ...


15

I found a solution myself and I wanted to share it here, hoping that it might save someone quite a few hours of research and staring at the "Preparing solution..." dialog. When inspecting the devenv.exe process with Process Monitor, I found out that it is pretty busy with accessing the .svn directory. Here is what I did (and this somehow solved the ...


15

Suggestion: Don't bother with switching. Remove it from source control (SVN) and check it in anew (git). Or, if removing it by Visual Studio tools doesn't work, here's how you do it manually: Close Visual Studio; Delete the .svn folder Open the .SLN file in notepad, find the lines which specify the SCC provider, and delete them. Open the solution in ...


14

Most likely, AnkhSVN isn't loaded yet at this point. Go to Tools - Options - Source Control, and select AnkhSVN as the active SCC Provider. Then go to File - Subversion - Change Source Control, and connect/bind the solution. This causes Ankh to be loaded the next time you open the solution by annotating the sln file. Other people checking out the same sln ...


14

Normally, packaged binaries are not kept in source control. If anything, use a separate repository for them. As a matter of fact, try to keep binaries away from your repository if at all possible. No compiled versions of your source code. (see comments as well) Get TortoiseSVN for use in Explorer. You can use the Export option (as opposed to checkout) for a ...


13

In the daily builds of AnkhSVN (and since March 2009 the stable version) the Switch command will handle this case for you. AnkhSVN will detect that the repository root doesn't match and then it will ask you if you wish to relocate. See http://ankhsvn.net/daily/ for the daily builds.


13

No, because the Express editions explicitly do not allow plugins. See also AnkhSVN's FAQ: Does it work with the Visual Studio 2005 / 2008 / 2010 Express versions? No, and it might never do so. The current position from Microsoft is that these SKUs will not support addins. That being said, there's nothing stopping you from using any other source ...


13

To add to previous answer I'd like to set up WinMerge as external Diff and Merge Tools after setting the source control plug-in (you have to install WinMerge first): Visual Studio -> TOOLS -> Options -> Expand the "Source Control" Node Double click on the Pending Changes will show the change in WinMerge:



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