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12

Yes it is, but I wouldn't recommend it as it's a bit tricky ;) First possibility: <?php $some_var1="1"; $some_var2="2"; function($param1, $param2) use ($some_var1, $some_var2) { call_user_func(__FUNCTION__, $other_param1, $other_param2); } ?> Another one: <?php $recursive = function () use (&$recursive){ // The function is now ...


9

You cannot define the Y combinator like that in Haskell. As you noticed, that results in an infinite type. Fortunately, it is already available in Data.Function as fix, where it's defined using a let binding: fix f = let x = f x in x


7

This is a bug in the Mono compiler. It violates section §12.3.3 of the specification. The variable fib cannot be used in the variable initializer, because it isn't definitely assigned.


7

As I noted in a comment above, if Mono does that then they have a bug. The spec is clear that this is supposed to be detected as an error. The bug is of course mostly harmless, and most of the time does what you want. We've considered changing the rules to make this sort of recursion legal; basically we'd have to add a special case to the spec that says that ...


7

Because the Y combinator needs infinite types, you'll need workarounds like this one. But I'd write your msss function as a one-liner like this: msss = fst . foldr (\x (gmax, lmax) -> let g = max (lmax + x) in (g gmax, g 0)) (0, 0)


6

Well let's think about it for a minute. What type does this lambda expression have? (\y f x -> f (y y f) x) Well f is a function (a -> b) -> a -> b, and x is some value b. What does that make y? Well given what we just said about f, (y y f) :: (a -> b) Also, since we are applying this expression to itself, we know that y has the same ...


3

You can find more information about recursive lambda expressions in this blog post by Mads Torgersen. He shows how to define the usual fixed point combinator. He uses factorial function as an example, so you can find your exact sample there :-). However, in practice, you can just define a local Func<..> variable and then mutate it. If you want to give ...


3

try this... Func<int, int> fib = null; fib = n => n > 1 ? fib(n - 1) + fib(n - 2) : n; ... The problem is that fib isn't defined when you try to use it in the above method so the static analyzer reports a compiler error.


3

If you have a working procedure, converting to anonymous procedures is relatively straightforward and mechanical. Give each lambda an extra argument, which is "itself", and duplicate the procedure. So (define (add-list list) (if (empty? list) 0 (+ (first list) (add-list (rest list))))) Becomes (λ(list) (if (empty? list) 0 (+ (first list) ...


2

The answer is complicated but not impossible. It took me several minutes to figure out. We first must define a utility function called $combinator(). The solution to your problem: $combinator( function($self) { function() use (&$self) { $chars = range(0, 9); $chars[] = ' '; length = 6; $count = count($chars); $string = ''; ...


1

A much saner method to do the same thing. Requires only one loop as well. $chars = array_merge(range(0, 9), array(' ')); $string = mt_rand(0, 9); for ($i = 1; $i <= 4; $i++) { $string .= $chars[array_rand($chars)]; } $string .= mt_rand(0, 9); Sorry for sidestepping the actual question though.


1

It seems that, in my excitement, I was fundamentally mistaken. Neither .NET nor Mono provides "Anonymous Recursion" in the way that the original article means. You could not pass around fib as a self-contained entity. Check out the following sequence in the Mono C# REPL: csharp> Func<int, int> fib = n => n > 1 ? fib(n - 1) + fib(n - 2) : n; ...



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