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1

Are you looking for something like this? var count=0; $("#btn1").click(function(){ count++; $("#List").append("Amount: <input type='text' name='Amount1" + (count) +"' value=0 /><br />Cost: <input type='text' name='Cost1" + (count) +"' value='0' /><br />Date: <input type='date' name='Date1" + ...


0

Do study Operators try this Hope it Helps $("#btn1").click(function(){ count++; $("#List").append("Amount: <input type='text' name='Amount1" + (count)+"'value=0 /><br />Cost: <input type='text' name='Cost1" + (count) +"' value='0' /<br />Date: <input type='date' name='Date1" + (count) +"' value='0' /><br/>Monthly: <input ...


0

You can go like this. A little manual, but transparent. site_no<- c(1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 4, 4, 4, 4, 5) date<- c(1/1/1990, 1/1/1991, 1/1/1992, 1/4/1963, 1/10/1970, 1/10/1975, 1/10/1980, 1/1/1990, 1/1/1998, 1/1/1999, 1/1/2000, 1/1/2005) measurement<- c(.5, .75, 1.0, .5, .6, 1.0, 1.5, 1.1, 1.2, 1.8, 1.9, 2) df<- ...


0

The element would be selected like $('script').appened('blah'); But i feel that that probably won't or shouldn't work. That be a very large security flaw if i was able to run my own script locally to append JavaScript to the script element of another page that i don't have core access to.


0

You can use LISTAGG to aggregate your rows in one column but like I said, it will be only one column. BTW, as I know, you can't have multiple columns with the same name : SQL Fiddle Oracle 11g R2 Schema Setup: CREATE TABLE Table1 ("ID" int, "Name" varchar2(5)) ; INSERT ALL INTO Table1 ("ID", "Name") VALUES (1, 'Bob') INTO Table1 ...


0

In Python 3 range returns an instance of the range class and not a list. If you want to manipulate the result of range you need a list, so: years = list(range(2010,2016)) years.append(2016) Finally, (and similarly to the append above) extend operates on the list you're calling it from rather than returning the new list so: years = list(range(2010,2016)) ...


1

append and extend operations on lists do not return anything (return just None). That is why years is not the list you expected.


5

You are storing the result of the list.append() or list.extend() method; both alter the list in place and return None. They do not return the list object again. Do not store the None result; store the range() result, then extend or append. Alternatively, use concatenation: years = range(2010, 2016) + [0] years = [0] + range(2010, 2016) Note that I'm ...


0

Function parameters are local variables of function. They are copies of the arguments. So the function parameter head is a copy of the argument head. Any changes of the parameter (of the copy of the argument) does not influence on the argument. You have to pass the head by reference. Define the function the following way //Append face(window, x, y) to the ...


2

The other answer is great -- but another fundamental difference is that insert is much slower: $ python -m timeit -s 'x=list(range(100000))' 'x.append(1)' 10000000 loops, best of 3: 0.19 usec per loop $ python -m timeit -s 'x=list(range(100000))' 'x.insert(len(x), 1)' 1000000 loops, best of 3: 0.514 usec per loop It's O(n), meaning the time it takes to ...


1

It's a guessing game since you don't show the relevant code. Luckily, it's quite easy to guess well in this case... The parameter you pass into the function is of type Face * and you set it to a new value (the new struct you allocated). Unfortunately, you're not returning this value, nor are you making sure the input parameter is capable of "transferring" ...


0

I believe it is because you are passing in the value of the pointer head, which creates a copy of the pointer. By setting head to another address, you're not modifying head outside of scope, but rather the head within the method scope. You'd need to pass in a pointer to the pointer to change it.


0

if (head == NULL) { printf("Called\n"); head = temp; } The assignment head = temp only modifies the local copy of the head pointer. So it is not propagated to the code that called push(). If head was NULL in the code that calls push(), then it will remain so. You could for example return the list head, as in: Face *push(Face* head, int ...


6

The difference between append and insert here is the same as in normal usage, and in most text editors. Append adds to the end of the list, while insert adds in front of a specified index. The reason they are different methods is both because they do different things, and because append can be expected to be a quick operation, while insert might take a while ...


3

You need to inject the $compile service into your controller and then compile the content against the controller's scope before appending it: $scope.printoptions = function() { var content = "<div class='printoption printhideelement' ng-click='printhide()'>Hide</div>"; $(".printOptionElements").append($compile(content)($scope)); ...


1

Event delegation need to be used for newly added elements. $(document).on('click',`#${divID} h3`,() => $(`#${elmToToggle}`).toggle());


-3

Don't do this. Don't try too be too clever. Just use a struct with the slice as a member. It adds literally zero overhead, and whoever will have to look at your code later (including you) will be grateful.


4

Inside the AddHeaderItem() method h is a pointer. You do not want to change the pointer but the pointed value: func (h *Headers) AddHeaderItem(item HeaderItem) { *h = append(*h, item) } Testing it: h := Headers{} fmt.Println(h) h.AddHeaderItem(HeaderItem{"myname1", "myvalue1"}) fmt.Println(h) h.AddHeaderItem(HeaderItem{"myname2", "myvalue2"}) ...


2

You can use the zip global function, which, given 2 sequences, returns a sequence of tuples: let pointsSequence = zip(xAxis, yAxis) You can then obtain an array of tuples by using the proper init: let chartPoints = Array(pointsSequence) Each element of the array is a (x, y) tuple - but values are unnamed, so you can access their individual values by ...


0

var xAxis = [1,2,3,4] var yAxis = [2,3,4,5] var chartPoints: [(x:Int,y:Int)] = Array() if(xAxis.count == yAxis.count){ for i in 0...xAxis.count-1 { let chartPoint = (x:xAxis[i],y:yAxis[i]) chartPoints.append(chartPoint) } } for pt in chartPoints{ ...


3

You should not reassign an empty list to rong inside the if...elif block, this causes any previous values in rong list to go away. You should just initialize rong before the game starts (maybe there is a while or for loop you didn't include that is the main part of the game) , you should initialize rong to [] there and only append to that list in the if ...


2

You can do something like this: String formatted = String.format("%03d", num); That will lead with however many zeros. For your example, you can use: System.out.printf("%-10s %03d" , word, Integer.parseInt(num)); If num is a float, use Float.parseFloat(num), or better yet declare it as the correct type. See below: public static void main(String[] ...


1

You can combine the .lstrip() and .rstrip() into a single .strip() call. Then, you were thinking that .append() both added lines to a list and joined lines into a single line. Here, we start DNASEQ with an empty string and use += to join the lines into a long string: DNA = open('DNAGCex.txt') DNAID = [] DNASEQ = [] for line in DNA: line = line.strip() ...


1

Within each iteration of the loop, you're only looking at a certain line from the file. This means that, although you certainly are appending lines that don't contain a linefeed at the end, you're still appending one of the file's lines at a time. You'll have to let the interpreter know that you want to combine certain lines, by doing something like setting ...


0

You are appending it to #perfectbrand-card-container so use that selector instead of .perfectbrand-container $("#perfectbrand-card-container").on('click','.pbt', function() { //-^--------------^------------- console.log($(this).text()); });


0

It would be easier to just use the set() by itself, but this would be a good implementation per the assignment instructions. It's really fast compared to a list only version! from collections import Set def get_exclusive_list(fname): words = [] with open(fname.txt, 'r') as file_d: data = file_d.read() [words.extend(li.split(' ')) for ...


0

Not sure what the following loop is supposed to do - for words in fh: if words in 1st:continue elif 1st.append The above does not do anything because you have already exhausted the file fh before control reaches this part. You should put an inner loop inside - for line in fh: - that goes over the words in words list one by one and appends to ...


1

The problem you're running into is that you've assigned $plus and $minus to data.frames, rather than atomic vectors. So when printing, R is showing the column name in the embedded data.frame ('Measure' in both cases), rather than the name of the list component ('plus' and 'minus'). str(summary.myData); ## 'data.frame': 3 obs. of 8 variables: ## $ Group : ...


0

For selecting a single value from a DataFrame or Series, at (label based scalar indexing) and iat (index based scalar indexing) are generally the fastest. numbers = [] numbers.append(df.iat(50, 24)) Lets say you had three pairs of numbers representing row and column index values where you want to lookup a value from your DataFrame. You could efficiently ...


0

You can use iloc for this: Numbers = [] value = df1.iloc[24,50] Numbers.append(value) Or as a more general example: import pandas as pd import numpy as np df = pd.DataFrame(index=range(0,5), data=[range(5*i,5*i+5) for i in range(0,5)]) df: 0 1 2 3 4 0 0 1 2 3 4 1 5 6 7 8 9 2 10 11 12 13 14 3 15 16 17 18 19 4 ...


0

This is due to the fact you are getting only one element from the list .Then list will return the element as it's original type class person: def __init__(self, FName, FLast,age ): self.FName=FName self.FLast=FLast self.age=age from sys import argv script = argv filename = raw_input('enter filename: ') txt = open(filename, ...


1

Few issues in your code - a.append[hi] - This is not how you append, append is a function, you have to call it passing it the value to append as parameter. You are defining a as a string in the line - a=lines[i+1] - Then you are trying to append to it. You may want to create a new list outside the while , and then keep appending to it. Example - ...


0

To append element you should use some_list.append(element) form


0

Solved. The issue was that I had to define the variables first - as.numeric or as.character. That way R could recognise what it had to do.


2

You can add the onclick handler functionally: var bar = "foo"; $("#parent").append($('<td>Whatever</td>').click( function() { alert(bar); }));


2

For large file you will want to break the file up into smaller files, upload each of those and then merge them together as composite objects. You will want to use the compose() function from the library. It seems there is no docs on it yet. After you've uploaded all the parts something like the following should work. One thing to make sure of is that the ...


2

In this case you don't need to append characters if you want each character to have the same rainbow color. You could do the following: label.attributedText = NSAttributedString(string: str, attributes: [NSForegroundColorAttributeName: rainbowColors()]) If you want to append characters you need to use NSMutableAttributedString. It has a method called ...


0

You are (will be) experiencing problems with the code above because you are appending the content of the hidden divs without checking if the load() action has completed. As it probably hasn't (the append is right below the load calls), the result is that the "mytarget" element will always be empty because the hidden elements are initially empty: <div ...


0

You can make a dictionary with keys (as 'Group' + str(x+1)'). And then add a value to the list! import random List1 = ['AAAA','BBBBB','CCCCC','DDDD','EEEE'] base_name = "Group" my_dic = dict() for x in range(len(List1)): my_dic[base_name + str(x +1)] = [] for x in range (len(List1)): losowanie1 = random.sample(List1,1) my_dic[base_name + str(x ...


1

Instead of FileOutputStream ofs = new FileOutputStream(file); You can use FileOutputStream ofs = new FileOutputStream(file, true); See the Java API here.


3

Set the append flag to true in the FileOutputStream ctor. FileOutputStream ofs = new FileOutputStream(file, true); See http://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/io/FileOutputStream.html


1

I think the simplest solution to your original question: def write_file h = { 'dog' => 'canine', 'cat' => 'feline', 'donkey' => 'asinine' } CSV.open("data.csv", "w", headers: h.keys) do |csv| csv << h.values end end With multiple hashes that all share the same keys: def write_file hashes = [ { 'dog' => 'canine', 'cat' => ...


0

The second operation will not erase the (first) file. But it does move the data of the second file. Erasing a file on any *nix system means removing the inode (which is just a pointer to where on the disk/ssd/flash the file actually starts.) The actual data is not overwritten or even moved. An example of inode data looks like this: $ stat file.sh ...


1

When the 2nd operation is performed above, will the file be just appended without actually being erased? File/Stream opening operations are implemented in Linux using fopen() for performing the required operations. See man 3 fopen for more info. FILE *fopen(const char *path, const char *mode); The fopen() function opens the file whose name is the ...


5

from this SO QA from the man page: a+ Open for reading and appending (writing at end of file). The file is created if it does not exist. The initial file position for reading is at the beginning of the file, but output is always appended to the end of the file. Answer: There is just one pointer which initially is at the start of the ...


5

That is because the mode spec "a" opens a file for appending, with the file pointer at the end. If you try to read from here, there is no data since the file pointer is at EOF. You should open with "r+" for reading and writing. If you read the whole file before writing, then the file pointer will be correctly positioned to append when you write more data. ...


1

I would do it this way: single_digit = col.a < 10 col['b'] = col.a.where(single_digit, col.a.values / 10) col['c'] = np.where(single_digit, 1, np.mod(col.a, 10)) So if a < 10, b is simply a and the result of integer division by 10 otherwise. Note that numpy arrays support integer division whereas pandas Series don't (as far as I know) which is why I ...


1

>>> df a 0 3 1 22 2 23 3 2 4 1 df['aa'] = df.apply(lambda row: row['a']*10+1 if 0<=row['a']<=9 else row['a'], axis=1) >>> df a aa 0 3 31 1 22 22 2 23 23 3 2 21 4 1 11 df['b'] = df.apply(lambda row: divmod(row['aa'], 10)[0], axis=1) df['c'] = df.apply(lambda row: divmod(row['aa'], 10)[1], axis=1) ...


3

Assuming your data is numeric. You can use np.mod(data, 10) to get the very last digit. import pandas as pd import numpy as np # data # =========================== df = pd.DataFrame({'a': [31, 22, 23, 21, 11]}) df.dtypes a int64 dtype: object # processing # ===================================== df['c'] = np.mod(df.a, 10) df a c 0 31 1 1 22 ...



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