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68

Of course it is possible to restart a Java application. I once wrote a Java application which was able to self update and therefore needed to restart itself. I used the following method (I hope it is still valid Java, since I striped out some parts): public void restartApplication() { final String javaBin = System.getProperty("java.home") + ...


22

import java.io.File; import java.io.IOException; import java.lang.management.ManagementFactory; public class Main { public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException, InterruptedException { StringBuilder cmd = new StringBuilder(); cmd.append(System.getProperty("java.home") + File.separator + "bin" + File.separator + "java "); ...


22

Note: Although this has been answered as 'not possible' I think it's a valid question for a new iOS developer to ask and there is something they can do which is probably what they want. There is a way to 'restart' your app from the user's perspective which is not technically restarting or exiting the iOS App. As pointed out by other answers an iOS App ...


18

First, i can not provide a link to an official documentation. But from what i've read every change in the bin-folder(incl. subfolders) will cause the IIS to recycle the application domain. Abrupt Application Pool Recycling Any modifications in the Application’s BIN Directory Making changes in any Configuration File/s, like Web.config or others ( if you ...


17

I use similar code to the code you tried when restarting apps. I send a timed cmd command to restart the app for me like this: ProcessStartInfo Info = new ProcessStartInfo(); Info.Arguments = "/C ping 127.0.0.1 -n 2 && \"" + Application.ExecutablePath + "\""; Info.WindowStyle = ProcessWindowStyle.Hidden; Info.CreateNoWindow = true; Info.FileName = ...


13

Perhaps you should think outside the box. Instead of futzing with the mutex / instance logic, you could simply create another executable that waits for your app to close then starts it again. As an added bonus, you can later use this mechanism to, for example, update some of your main app's binaries. It's also much easier to run it elevated instead of ...


13

It calls the static main method with an empty string array. See if this makes it any clearer: String[] args = new String[0]; // Or String[] args = {}; main(args); Admittedly it's unusual to call a main method from non-main method... and this won't really "restart" the application. It will call it from within your existing handler which may well have nasty ...


10

You can restart running application by right clicking it in debug window and selecting "Terminate and relaunch". And quickly switching beetween views with Ctrl+F8 Also if you've already terminated the application from console, you can simply hit ctrl + f11 If you really want you can also add custom shortcut for terminating and relaunching by Window -> ...


10

Short answer: You can't. If you shut down your application, you would loose all control and not be able to start it again. Long answer: You shouldn't need to. I recommend you to design your application so that it is easy to clean every thing up and after that create a new instance of your "main" class. Many applications are designed to do nothing but ...


9

Yes, you can; see this answer. However, it is not a good idea. Until ASP.Net restarts the AppDomain, it will not look at web.config. If you change web.config, your changes will have no effect until the AppDomain is restarted.


9

To restart application, try: #include <QApplication> #include <QProcess> ... // restart: qApp->quit(); QProcess::startDetached(qApp->arguments()[0], qApp->arguments());


8

Application.Restart is what you are looking for I think. I used this on one project and have to say that it worked fine for me - but other people seem to have run into issues with this.


8

You can use Application.Restart() method to restart your application, if you don't like to use that method, here is a custom method that I used for restarting.


8

Why not use Application.Restart(); ?? More on Restart


7

You're not going to be able to restart your application without exiting the JVM - the JVM will have allocated objects, threads etc. and without a lot of housekeeping you're not going to easily trash this. I think an easier way is to wrap your application in a script, and to get the script to restart your app if it exits with a particular exit code. That way ...


7

This post references the inspiration for R's condition handling. For 1., I think of simpleCondition as illustrating how one can construct custom conditions, e.g,. myCondition <- function(message, call=NULL, type=c("overflow", "underflow", "zero")) { type <- match.arg(type) # only allowed types past here class <- c(type, ...


6

First of all, although it is possible to force kill your app, this is not allowed by Apple and will rejected. Even if it wasn't rejected, there is no way to restart your app once it's killed. You just need to find some way to reset your app through your code, as Jason Coco said. It might be more work, but it's worth it to not get rejected by Apple.


5

You can create an external settings file and then reference it in your web.config. You will need to change the attribute "restartOnExternalChanges" to false in your machine.config file. See: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms228057.aspx


5

You have the initial application A, you want to restart. So, When you want to kill A, a little application B is started, B kill A, then B start A, and kill B. To start a process: Process.Start("A.exe"); To kill a process, is something like this Process[] procs = Process.GetProcessesByName("B"); foreach (Process proc in procs) proc.Kill();


5

try this, it works for me. -(void)restart { MyAppDelegate *appDelegate = (MyAppDelegate *)([UIApplication sharedApplication].delegate); [appDelegate.navigationController popToRootViewControllerAnimated:NO]; UIViewController *topViewController = appDelegate.navigationController.topViewController; Class class = [topViewController class]; ...


5

use this <activity android:screenOrientation="landscape" android:configChanges="orientation|keyboardHidden" android:name="VncCanvasActivity"> see this


5

I figured out how to restart the app after reinstallation. In case it helps others, here's how I did it (note the added "addFlags" method call before startActivity): try { Intent intent = new Intent(Intent.ACTION_VIEW); intent.setDataAndType(Uri.fromFile(new File(this.apkpath)), "application/vnd.android.package-archive"); // Add ...


4

You can have two extensions. And restart the target extension from the other. If that suits you read on. content.js window.addEventListener('load', function (e) { // create a button and add it to the page var btn = document.createElement('button'); btn.innerHTML = 'Restart child extension'; btn.addEventListener('click', function (e) { ...


4

performSelector: withObject: afterDelay: is essentially just a timer and timers are not allowed in the background. Instead you should just record the timestamp when the user first logs in to the application and save it. Then each time the application comes to the foreground just check to see if its been 12 hours from the current time to the log in time.


4

I tried using a windows service with a timer but the limitation of windows service is that a user can stop the service. This is not a limitation of Windows Services. It is a limitation of the fact that the user owns the computer and can therefore do basically whatever they want to or with it. There is no way to create an application that cannot be ...


4

For restarting an application you can use startDetached after quiting the process: #include <QApplication> #include <QProcess> ... // restart the app: qApp->quit(); QProcess::startDetached(qApp->arguments()[0], qApp->arguments());


4

Why not just the following? Process.Start(Application.ExecutablePath); Application.Exit(); If you want to be shure the app does not run twice either use Environment.Exit(-1) which kills the process instantaneous (not really the nice way) or something like starting a second app, which checks for the process of the main app and starts it again as soon as ...


4

yes use a Alarm manager to wake it up... you can use the alarm manager in the background service or something and then make the app to open.


4

There will be an "auto-start" feature in ASP.NET 4.0 (Scott Guthrie talks about it), but that won't help you now. Please be sure that the Application Pool your website/application is running in, won't go to "sleep" automatically. A default AppPool is set to shut down after 20 minutes inactivty. As i recall this doesn't make the website rebuild, but makes ...


4

Strictly speaking, a Java program cannot restart itself since to do so it must kill the JVM in which it is running and then start it again, but once the JVM is no longer running (killed) then no action can be taken. You could do some tricks with custom classloaders to load, pack, and start the AWT components again but this will likely cause lots of ...



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