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4

library(expm) x %*% (y %^% 5) # [,1] [,2] #[1,] 5743 12555 #[2,] 8370 18298 Benchmarks: set.seed(42) x <- matrix(rnorm(1e4), 1e2, 1e2) y <- matrix(rnorm(1e4), 1e2, 1e2) fun1 <- function(x, y, j) { for(i in 1:j) { x <- x %*% y } x } fun2 <- function(x, y, i) { x %*% (y %^% i) } fun3 <- function(x, y, i) { ...


3

Generally to get the sum of a variable up to a certain point in a data frame you would use a cumulative sum, which is the function cumsum in R. In this case you're looking for the cumulative sum of a variable that's 1 if ratio is too large and 0 otherwise. You can do this with: d$error.counter <- cumsum(d$ratio > 1) d # ratio other error.counter # 1 ...


2

Firstly, don't set an object names 'list'. This could cause a conflict with list. Try this: set.seed(123) data <- data.frame(Revenue = rnorm(100, mean=1000, sd=100), dummy1 = sample(c(0,1), 100, replace = TRUE), dummy2 = sample(c(0,1), 100, replace = TRUE), dummy3 = sample(c(0,1), 100, replace = TRUE)) l <- list(data$dummy1, data$dummy2, ...


2

I'd try to obtain an array (instead of a nested list) in this way: IndTotboot <-array(replicate(5*length(Inds),prop.table(table(sample(as.factor(Diet), 20 ,replace = T))),simplify=T), dim=c(length(Diet),5,length(Inds)), dimnames=list(Diet,NULL,Inds)) With replicate you can execute an expression a given number of times and store the result as an ...


2

slightly redundant because it sorts twice, but vectorised, paste(pmin(a,b), pmax(a,b)) Edit: alternative with ifelse, ifelse(a < b, paste(a, b), paste(b, a))


2

I'm still not entirely clear on what you're looking for, but maybe this is another option: library(reshape2) x <- data.frame(x = 1:5,y = 6:10) x[c(1,3),1] <- NA > setNames(melt(lapply(x,function(x) mean(is.na(x)))),c('Mean','Variable')) Mean Variable 1 0.4 x 2 0.0 y


2

Reader is a method. You cannot index it, but you can index the result of it: Console.Write(Reader()[y,x]); // ^ You need these parens to invoke the method. However, this will invoke the function for every loop, reading the file in 11 * 54 = 594 times! Read the file once and store the result instead; there is no need to call this method ...


2

You can try df1$Name <- sapply(as.character(df1$ID), function(x) paste(unique(df2[match(strsplit(x, ",")[[1]], df2$ID), "Name"]), collapse = ",")) df1 # ID Name # 1 1,2,3 John # 2 4,5 Stacy # 3 6 Alice Although I doubt sapply will be faster than a for loop. I've also added paste function here in case you have more than one name ...


2

How about this method? (n.b., I edited this answer in light of the comment below) so the apply step could take a single function with shared calculations and return the required series for the merge step. data = {'state':['Ohio','Ohio','Ohio','Nevada','Nevada'], 'year':[2000,2001,2002,2001,2002],'pop':[1.5,1.7,3.6,2.4,2.9]} frame = pd.DataFrame(data, ...


2

You could read the acronyms from a web page and match the team names against yours. Here's one example. > library(XML) > tab <- readHTMLTable("http://sportsdelve.wordpress.com/abbreviations/")[[1]] > head(tab) # V1 V2 # 1 ARZ Arizona Cardinals # 2 ATL Atlanta Falcons # 3 BAL Baltimore ...


2

Bioconductor has a stringDist function that can do this for you: source("http://bioconductor.org/biocLite.R") biocLite("Biostrings") library(Biostrings) stringDist(c("Hello", "Helo", "Hole", "Apple", "Ape", "New", "Old", "System", "Systemic"), upper=TRUE) ## 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ## 1 1 3 4 5 4 4 6 7 ## 2 1 2 4 4 3 3 6 7 ## 3 3 2 3 3 4 3 5 7 ## 4 4 4 ...


2

When using nested loops, it's always interesting to check whether outer() doesn't do the job for you. outer() is a vectorized solution for nested loops; it applies a vectorized function to every possible combination of the elements in the first two arguments. as stringdist() works on vectors, you can simply do: library(stringdist) strings <- c("Hello", ...


2

When you called apply, your data frame was converted to a character matrix. The spaces appear because each element is converted to the width of the widest element in the column. You can do it with a for loop-like sapply call > ( s <- sapply(seq(nrow(mydf)), function(i) mydf[i, 3]) ) # [1] TRUE FALSE > class(s) # [1] "logical" A workaround to ...


1

Using lapply with colMeans set.seed(42) dat <- as.data.frame(matrix(sample(1:20, 20*1200, replace=TRUE), ncol=20)) n <- seq_len(nrow(dat)) res <- do.call(rbind,lapply(split(dat, (n-1)%/%4 +1),colMeans, na.rm=TRUE)) dim(res) #[1] 300 20 Explanation Here the idea is to create a grouping variable that splits the datasets into subsets of ...


1

apply does not work directly with data.frames; it works with matrices and with matrices all elements must be the same atomic type. If you pass in a data.frame, apply() will coerce it to a matrix. Since character values can't be stored in a more "simple" datatype, everything is converted up to a character value. Normally you don't have think about applying ...


1

Just for fun, here is a solution using RcppEigen: C++ code: // [[Rcpp::depends(RcppEigen)]] #include <RcppEigen.h> using namespace Rcpp; using Eigen::Map; using Eigen::MatrixXd; typedef Map<MatrixXd> MapMatd; // [[Rcpp::export]] NumericMatrix XYpow(NumericMatrix A, NumericMatrix B, const int j) { const MapMatd ...


1

Reduce("%*%", c(list(x), rep(list(y), 5))) # [,1] [,2] # [1,] 5743 12555 # [2,] 8370 18298 will do the trick.


1

Use f(args...). f = (x, y) -> x + y list = [1, 2] console.log(f(list...)) # -> 3 You can also mix and match this with regular arguments: f = (a, b, c, d) -> a*b + c*d list = [2, 3] console.log(f(1, list..., 4)) # -> 1*2 + 3*4 == 14


1

first split your data frame by key: dfs <- split(df, df$key) # presuming your data frame is named `df` now write a function taking a data frame and comparing first and second row (for simplicity, we're not going to check whether the data frame actually has 2 rows - that's just taken for granted): chk <- function(x) sapply(x, function(u) ...


1

Thanks to the hint of @hrbrmstr I found out that the stringdist package itself provides a function called stringdistmatrix, which does what I was asking for (see here). The function call is simply: stringdistmatrix(strings, strings)


1

apply expects a matrix - and if it gets a data frame, it will convert it to a matrix. So you can't rely on $ with apply. One way to quickly convert your code to something that works is: sapply(split(raw_DF, rownames(raw_DF)), apply.cals, cal_DF=calibrant_DF) split(raw_df, rownames(raw_DF)) converts raw_DF into a list, where each component is a data frame ...


1

Obligatory data.table solution - options(stringsAsFactors=FALSE) library(data.table) ## set.seed(1234) dTbl <- data.table( ID = sample(c(letters,LETTERS),100000,replace=TRUE), NrBlocks = rnorm(100000), key = "ID") ## gTbl <- dTbl[ , list(sumNrBlocks = sum(NrBlocks)), by = list(ID)] ## > head(gTbl) ID sumNrBlocks 1: A 56.50234 2: ...


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Here's one approach: apply(cbind(a, b), 1, function(x) paste(sort(x), collapse=" ")) ## [1] "george harry" "harry steve" "chris harry" "chris harry" ## [5] "harry steve" "george steve" "chris steve" "george harry" Using your initial attempt, you could also do the following but they both require more typing (not sure about speed): ...


1

See ?weighted.mean. The name of the argument is w, not weights : avg1 <- avg2 <- x[, 1] avg1[] <- apply(x, 1, weighted.mean, w = w1, na.rm = TRUE) avg2[] <- apply(x, 1, weighted.mean, w = w2, na.rm = TRUE)



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