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0

We need to export the data using "clusterExport". #Create cluster clus <- makeCluster(8) clusterExport(clus, list("data","stringdist") , envir=environment()) clusterEvalQ(clus, compare_strings <- function(j,i) { #library(stringdist) #print(i) value = ...


3

Just in case if you have a huge data set, you can use plyr's adply() which is faster compared to apply() library(plyr) adply(df, 1, function(x) data.frame( my.stat = sum(1-log2((x[,x != max(x)]))/log2(max(x))) / (length(x)-1))) #tissueA tissueB tissueC my.stat #1 4.5 6.2 5.8 0.1060983 #2 3.2 4.7 6.6 0.2817665


3

Try this: #data df <- read.table(text=" tissueA tissueB tissueC gene1 4.5 6.2 5.8 gene2 3.2 4.7 6.6") #result apply(df,1,function(i){ my.max <- max(i) my.statistic <- (1-log2(i)/log2(my.max)) my.sum <- sum(my.statistic) my.answer <- my.sum/(length(i)-1) my.answer }) #result # gene1 gene2 # ...


0

Close your template tag and delete the inline style from there. Also you should use elem.on() instead elem.bind() var mainApp = angular.module("mainApp", []); mainApp.directive('helloWorld', function() { return { restrict: 'AE', template: '<input type="text" placeholder="Enter a color" ng-model="color"/><p>Hello ...


1

Or you can change waht you did to: apply(dat,1, function(x) ifelse(sum(x)==0, 0, min(x[x!=0]))) [1] 0 1 2


1

You can try indx <- !!rowSums(dat!=0) is.na(dat[indx,]) <- dat[indx,]==0 do.call(pmin, c(dat, na.rm=TRUE)) #[1] 0 1 2 Or without changing the original dataset library(car) recode(do.call(pmin, c((NA^!dat)*dat, na.rm=TRUE)), 'NA=0') #[1] 0 1 2


0

Another idea: do.call(rbind, Reduce("+", lapply(nums, tabulate, max(unlist(nums))), accumulate = TRUE)) # [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5] # [1,] 1 0 0 0 0 # [2,] 1 1 0 0 0 # [3,] 1 1 1 0 0 # [4,] 1 1 1 1 0 # [5,] 1 1 1 1 1 # [6,] 2 1 1 1 1 # [7,] 2 2 1 1 1 ...


2

Using rowsum seems to be faster (at least for this small example dataset) than the data.table approach: sgibb <- function(datframe) { data.frame(Group = unique(df$Group), Avg = rowsum(df$Weighted_Value, df$Group)/rowsum(df$SumVal, df$Group)) } Adding the rowsum approach to @platfort's benchmark: library(microbenchmark) library(dplyr) ...


2

Here's a base R solution. It's not the fastest for larger (500k+) datasets, but so you can see what may be happening "under the hood" in the other functions. weight.avg <- function(datframe) { s <- split(datframe, datframe$Group) avg <- sapply(s, function(x) sum(x[ ,2]) / sum(x[ ,3])) data.frame(Group = names(avg), Avg = avg) } ...


3

library(data.table) setDT(df)[, sum(Weighted_Value) / sum(SumVal), by = Group] but I don't see the time series you are referring to. check out library(zoo) for that.


2

Try using dplyr it should be faster than base R library(dplyr) df <- read.table(text = "Timestamp Weighted_Value SumVal Group 1 1600 800 1 2 1000 1000 2 3 1000 1000 2 4 1000 1000 2 5 800 500 3 6 400 500 ...


3

Using the Matrix package (which ships with a standard installation of R) nums <- c(1,2,3,4,5,1,2,4,3,5) apply(Matrix::sparseMatrix(i=seq_along(nums), j=nums), 2, cumsum) # [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5] # [1,] 1 0 0 0 0 # [2,] 1 1 0 0 0 # [3,] 1 1 1 0 0 # [4,] 1 1 1 1 0 # [5,] 1 1 1 ...


2

For your first query, you can get there with something like: sapply(unique(nums), function(x) cumsum(nums==x) ) # [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5] # [1,] 1 0 0 0 0 # [2,] 1 1 0 0 0 # [3,] 1 1 1 0 0 # [4,] 1 1 1 1 0 # [5,] 1 1 1 1 1 # [6,] 2 1 1 1 1 # [7,] 2 ...


0

I would suggest a different approach to your problem. First, let's generate a sample data set: set.seed(2015) # make sure the example is reproducible # create a sample data set d <- as.data.frame(matrix(sample(20:40,20,replace=T),nrow=4)) # V1 V2 V3 V4 V5 # 1 21 22 33 20 25 # 2 37 27 30 28 21 # 3 26 30 34 35 37 # 4 20 21 28 38 28 For simplicity, I ...


0

Sounds like you are trying to reshape data into wide format. I find that dplyr and tidyr find nice tools to accomplish this. define data library(tidyr) library(dplyr) ptSeenSub <- rbind.data.frame(c(1,"a"), c(1,"b"), c(2,"a"), c(2,"d"), c(3,"e"), c(3,"f")) reshape result <- ptSeenSub %>% group_by(PARENT_EVENT_ID) %>% mutate(k = ...


2

Try mapply(function(x,y) tapply(x,y, FUN=mean) , Example[seq(1, ncol(Example), 2)], Example[seq(2, ncol(Example), 2)]) Or instead of seq(1, ncol(Example), 2) just use c(TRUE, FALSE) and c(FALSE, TRUE) for the second case


1

You can use mapply: mapply(FUN= distancePointSegment, point_coords[1,], point_coords[2,], MoreArgs = list(x1=x1, x2=x2, y1=y1, y2=y2)) Or change your function and use apply: # Function that I want to apply: distancePointSegment <- function(p, x1, y1, x2, y2) { px <- p[1] #the coordinates are passed as a vector to the function py <- ...


3

This is easier than you're making it # Which are the rows with bad values for mm? Create an indexing vector: bad_mm <- is.na(zooplankton$length_mm) # Now, for those rows, replace length_mm with length_units/10 zooplankton$length_mm[bad_mm] <- zooplankton$length_units[bad_mm]/10 Remember to use is.na(x) instead of x==NA when checking for NA vals. ...


0

Almost there. You should use is.na(myVariable) and not myVariable ==NA


1

Depending on what your final goal is, it can be much faster to fit a base model, update it with add1, and extract the F-test/AIC you want: > basemodel <- lm(y~x1+x2+x3, dat1) > > add1(object=basemodel, grep("z\\d", names(dat1), value=TRUE), test="F") Single term additions Model: y ~ x1 + x2 + x3 Df Sum of Sq RSS AIC F value ...


1

Use the apply function apply(mtcars, 2 ,head) this is the result mpg cyl disp hp drat wt qsec vs am gear carb Mazda RX4 21.0 6 160 110 3.90 2.620 16.46 0 1 4 4 Mazda RX4 Wag 21.0 6 160 110 3.90 2.875 17.02 0 1 4 4 Datsun 710 22.8 4 108 93 3.85 2.320 18.61 1 1 4 1 Hornet 4 Drive ...


1

Here's a different approach that restructures the data to allow for a simpler lapply call: library(tidyr) longdat1 <- dat1 %>% gather(varname, z, z1:z2) listofdfs <- split(x = longdat1, f = longdat1$varname) lapply(listofdfs, function(x) lm(y ~ x1 + x2 + x3 + z, data = x)) This converts the data to a long format using gather, where the ...


3

I guess that you can just transpose your matrix and use vectorization: t(foo(t(bar),a,b,c)) This should work for every vectorized foo.


8

I don't see why you bother with a function at all: > a <- matrix(4:6,nrow = 5,ncol = 3,byrow = TRUE) > b <- matrix(3:1,nrow = 5,ncol = 3,byrow = TRUE) > c <- matrix(1:3,nrow = 5,ncol = 3,byrow = TRUE) > (a*bar + b)^c [,1] [,2] [,3] [1,] 7 1024 300763 [2,] 11 1369 389017 [3,] 15 1764 493039 [4,] 19 2209 614125 [5,] 23 ...


3

While what Sam has provided works and is a good solution, I would personally prefer to go about it slightly differently. His answer has already been accepted, so I'm just posting this for the sake of completeness. dat1 <- data.frame(y = rpois(100, 5), x1 = runif(100), x2 = runif(100), x3 = ...


2

You can use sweep; usually this is for subtracting the mean from each column, but you can pass in an index instead to get parallel indexing across a,b and c: > sweep(bar, 2, seq_along(a), function(x,i) foo(x, a[i], b[i], c[i]), FALSE) [,1] [,2] [,3] [1,] 7 1024 300763 [2,] 11 1369 389017 [3,] 15 1764 493039 [4,] 19 2209 614125 [5,] 23 ...


2

You could put your parameters into the vector: newbar <- rbind(a,b,c,bar) newfoo <- function(z){x <- z[-(1:3)]; (z[1]*x+z[2])^z[3]} apply(newbar,2,newfoo) which gives [,1] [,2] [,3] 7 1024 300763 11 1369 389017 15 1764 493039 19 2209 614125 23 2704 753571


11

We could split the 'bar' by 'column' (col(bar)) and with mapply we can apply 'foo' for the corresponding 'a', 'b', 'c' values to each column of 'bar' mapply(foo, split(bar, col(bar)), a, b, c) Or without using apply ind <- col(bar) (a[ind]*bar +b[ind])^c[ind]


1

With this dummy data: dat1 <- data.frame(y = rpois(100,5), x1 = runif(100), x2 = runif(100), x3 = runif(100), z1 = runif(100), z2 = runif(100) ) You could get your list of two lm objects this way: lapply(dat1[5:6], function(x) lm(dat1$y ~ dat1$x1 + dat1$x2 + dat1$x3 + x)) Which iterates through those two columns and substitutes them as arguments ...


3

The most direct way in base R is to use aggregate: > aggregate(Size ~ ., mydf, mean) Color Animal Size 1 Green Frog 1.5 2 Red Frog 5.5 There, the "." represents all of the other grouping columns, while "Size" is the column you want to aggregate. Other options include: library(data.table) as.data.table(mydf)[, mean(Size), by = list(Color, ...


0

The following preserves the original data structure. Is it what's looked for? df = data.frame('test'=c(0,0,1,0)) df[] <- apply(df,2,function(j){sub(0,'00',j)}) df[] <- apply(df,2,function(j){sub(1,'01',j)}) df[] <- apply(df,2,function(j){sub(2,'10',j)}) df # test # 1 00 # 2 00 # 3 01 # 4 00 df1 = t(data.frame('test'=c(0,0,1,0))) df1[] ...


2

thanks to thelatemail what I wanted is called a rolling mean. I found a solution. library(zoo) x=replicate(3, rnorm(20)) rollapply(x[,2], 2, mean, na.pad = 1, align="right")


2

Try filter - what you are doing is a rolling mean. filter(x[,2], rep(1/3,3), sides=1)


0

Here is my solution, using plyrs rbind.fill: df <- read.table(header = TRUE, text = ' V1 V2 V3 x y y x x z y z z') require(plyr) out <- rbind.fill(lapply(df, function(x) as.data.frame.matrix(t(table(x))))) out[is.na(out)] <- 0 out # x y z # 1 2 1 0 # 2 1 1 1 # 3 0 1 2


1

You are almost there, as the error says, you just need to define a function in apply: apply(df, 2, function(u) table(factor(u, levels=vec))) # V1 V2 V3 #x 2 1 0 #y 1 1 1 #z 0 1 2 You can also use lapply function which iterates over the columns of your data.frame: do.call(rbind,lapply(df, function(u) table(factor(u, levels=vec)))) # x y z #V1 ...


0

I think I understand what you're after. This is actually slightly more complex than it may seem, because months are not regular periods of time; they vary in number of days, and February varies between years due to leap years. Thus a simple regular logical or numeric index vector will not be sufficient to calculate this result precisely. You need to take ...


0

Speaking generally, functions should not know about more than they need to know about. If you write a function that requires a data.frame, when it is not essential that the input data be provided in a data.frame, then you are making your function more restrictive than it needs to be. The correct way to write this function is as follows: bmi <- ...


0

I think this is what you're looking for. The easiest way to refer to columns of a data frame functionally is to use quoted column names. In principle, what you're doing is this data[, "weight"] / data[, "height"]^2 but inside a function you might want to let the user specify that the height or weight column is named differently, so you can write your ...


1

Because you're passing your data df as a reference and assigning directly to it each time by calling apply in your func then it overwrites with the last operation: In [20]: def my_test(i, x): x['interrel'] = x.apply(lambda row: i['k2'] - row['k2'] if i['name'] != row['name'] else 0, axis=1) #print(x['interrel']) print("x-----",x, "\n-------") ...


3

You can use rolling join from data.table package library(data.table) setkey(setDT(df), x) df1 <- data.table(x=a, id1=1:length(a)) setkey(df1, x) df1[df, roll="nearest"] id1 column will give you the desired result.


2

As mentioned by @DavidArenburg, there are better ways to do this. If you are really after factors, then you can do as @David recommended: df[] <- lapply(df, factor, levels = levels, labels = labels) The [] preserves the structure of the input while assigning the value returned from the function/s you've applied. If you are mostly concerned about ...


1

I think you might be trying too hard to use an apply() based approach when simple subsetting might be much easier to implement: df[,][df[,] == -1] <- "Don't Know" df[,][df[,] == 0] <- "Not Mentioned" df[,][df[,] == 1] <- "Mentioned" If you had a longer list of recoding over multiple values you could easily put this in a loop over your lookup ...


0

If I understand what you want correctly it's just a matter of making sure your function returns a vector of values rather than a data.frame object. I think this function will do what you want when run through the mutate() step: idw_w=function(x,y,z){ geog2 <- data.frame(x,y,z) coordinates(geog2) = ~x+y geog.grd <- ...


0

I'd assign directly to a df consisting of your new df's and modify the func body to return a Series constructed with a list of the data: In [9]: df = pd.DataFrame({'a':[1, 2, 3, 4, 5]}) df Out[9]: a 0 1 1 2 2 3 3 4 4 5 In [10]: def func(x): return pd.Series([x*3, x*10]) ‚Äč df[['b','c']] = df['a'].apply(func) df Out[10]: a b c 0 1 3 ...


1

Try using zip: usrdata['columnB'], usrdata['columnC'] = zip(*usrdata.apply(functionB, axis=1))


1

First of all in R variables in the global environment are visible to functions, so you don't have to pass them the way you do. I am not entirely clear what you want to do but apply family of functions use your input as the first variable and other variables need to be constant (unless you are using mapply). You need to pass these other variables as ...


0

There's no clean and easy functional solution in ES5. Here's the simplest I have: var myary = Array.apply(0,Array(N)).map(function(_,i){return i}); Edit: Be careful that expressions of this kind, while being sometimes convenient, can be very slow. This commit I made was motivated by performance issues. An old style and boring for loop can often be much ...


1

Using a matrix. Using a matrix operation on a matrix is not slow: mat <- t(as.matrix(dt0[,-1,with=FALSE])) colnames(mat) <- dt0[[1]] mat[] <- na.spline(mat,na.rm=FALSE) which gives TOTAL,F,AD TOTAL,F,AL TOTAL,F,AM TOTAL,F,AT TOTAL,F,AZ 2014 32832 1409931 1692440 4351253 4755163 2013 37408 1409931 ...


1

You are doing rowwise operations in your apply version and colwise operations in your data.table version. You can do the rowwise operation in data.table if you set by = 1:nrow(dt). dt2b <- dt0b[, as.list(na.spline(unlist(.SD), na.rm=FALSE)), by = 1:nrow(dt0b)] You can also use .SDcols, so that you don't need to split up the data. IF the ...


0

You can accomplish the same thing by passing the function directly into the apply apply(test, 1, function(x) if(x[1] > 0) sum(x) else x[1] - x[2] - x[3]) [1] 4 7 10 If you want to use your UDF you need to modify it. testfn = function(mydf){ if(mydf[1] > 0){y = mydf[1] + mydf[2] + mydf[3]} if(mydf[1] < 0){y = mydf[1] - mydf[2] - mydf[3]} ...



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