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1

As @lmm suggested, it would be better to provide a custom Format[Role] rather than trying to create instances in a weird way. Something like this: implicit val fmt = new Format[Role] { def reads(js: JsValue): JsResult[Role] = { js.validate[String] fold ( error => JsError(error), role => role match { ...


2

e[ eval( parse(text= paste(names(condition), "==", condition, sep=" ", collapse="&")) ) , ] #--------- a b c d 3 3 6 9 12 You could as an envir=e argument to eval to make it a bit "safer".


2

The way to get your st string example to work is eval(parse()), but that's not generally recommended. (See here for details on why it's a bad idea: What specifically are the dangers of eval(parse(...))?.) > e[eval(parse(text = st)), ] a b c d 3 3 6 9 12 If you could share a bit more context, it would be easier to come up with alternate solutions. ...


3

You can use expressions, something like conds <- list(W = as.name("a"), X = 3, Y = as.name("b"), Z = 6) expr <- substitute(W == X & Y == Z, env = conds) e[with(e, eval(expr)), ] # a b c d # 3 3 6 9 12 You can also use Hadley's lazyeval package which is fun and simple to use. And we can create a function that acts similar to dplyr::filter ...


1

You can add arguments to the function if necessary, but this replicates what you're trying to do. foo <- function(data, column1, x, column2, y){ out <- data[data[, column1] == x & data[, column2] == y, ] return(out) } foo(dF, "a", 3, "b", 6)


4

You can try data1 <- data[with(data, ave(as.character(nm), gp, FUN= function(x) length(unique(x)))>1),] transform(data1, rm=ave(as.character(nm), gp, FUN=function(x) duplicated(x)|duplicated(x,fromLast=TRUE))) # ind id gp nm rm #1 22 T297170 G1 MaskedMarvel TRUE #2 58 T304934 G1 ...


0

I'm not permitted to comment yet, so I'm giving an answer instead -- does anyone have a solution to this other than agstudy's? The tm_map function is supposed to be highly parallelized, and designed for lazy execution, both of which are necessary for large corpora. Putting a global counter into tm_map prevents that functionality. There has to be a better ...


1

It is just one observation per row. Note that you get NA estimates as there are not enough degrees of freedom. The idea would be: mapply(function(x,y) lm(y~x)$coefficients, DF[,1], DF[,2]) Or apply(DF1, 1, function(x) lm(x[2]~x[1])$coefficients) EDIT Suppose, you have many observations per row i.e. x and y variables span over many columns ...


1

This should do: (define (create-obj mlist) (lambda (method parms) (let ((func (assoc method mlist))) (if func (apply (cdr func) parms) "Error: no such method"))))


2

You could use rowMeans transform(mix, Mean=rowMeans(mix[,2:3]), check.names=FALSE) # agrp 1998-1999 2000-2001 tot Mean #1 1 140903 72208 213111 106555.5 #2 2 88322 33704 122026 61013.0 #3 3 18175 3804 21979 10989.5 #4 4 6125 797 6922 3461.0


4

Much as I like,... errr, love rle , here's a shootoff: EDIT: Can't figure out exactly what's up with dplyr so I used dplyr::lead . I'm on OSX, R3.1.2, and latest dplyr from CRAN. xlet<-sample(letters,1e5,rep=T) rleit<-function(x) rle(x)$values lagit<-function(x) x[x!=lead(x, default=1)] tailit<-function(x) x[x!=c(tail(x,-1), tail(x,1))] ...


5

With base R, I like funny algorithmics: x <- c("a", "a", "a", "b", "c", "c", "d", "e", "a", "a", "b", "b", "b", "e", "e", "d", "d") x[x!=c(x[-1], FALSE)] #[1] "a" "b" "c" "d" "e" "a" "b" "e" "d"


5

library(dplyr) x <- c("a", "a", "a", "b", "c", "c", "d", "e", "a", "a", "b", "b", "b", "e", "e", "d", "d") x[x!=lag(x, default=1)] #[1] "a" "b" "c" "d" "e" "a" "b" "e" "d" EDIT: For data.frame mydf <- data.frame( V1 = c("a", "a", "a", "b", "c", "c", "d", "e", "a", "a", "b", "b", "e", "e", "d", "d"), V2 = c(1, 2, 3, 2, 4, 1, 3, 9, ...


8

One easy way is to use rle: Here's your sample data: x <- scan(what = character(), text = "a a a b c c d e a a b b b e e d d") # Read 17 items rle returns a list with two values: the run length ("lengths"), and the value that is repeated for that run ("values"). rle(x)$values # [1] "a" "b" "c" "d" "e" "a" "b" "e" "d" Update: For a data.frame If ...


2

One way to see what's going on is to add print(str(x)) to your last2na function. Or plain replace it with str: str(d[,2]) # An ‘xts’ object on 2014-12-14/2014-12-20 containing: # Data: int [1:7, 1] 8 9 10 11 12 13 NA # Indexed by objects of class: [Date] TZ: UTC # xts Attributes: # NULL Versus: apply(d, 2, str) # Named int [1:7] 1 2 3 4 NA NA ...


0

Looks like apply can't handle xts objects, and your function can't handle a matrix: d <- as.matrix(d) d last2na(d[,2]) Here's an (inelegant, I admit) solution: last2na_matrix <- function(x) {x[is.na(x[-1])] <- NA; x[is.na(x[-1])] <- NA; return(x) } apply(d, 2, last2na_matrix)


0

Suppose if there no variation in the dataset for a particular row new.CL[2,] <- 45 Using your code, gives #Error in t.test.default(x = m[1:3], y = m[4:6], alternative = "two.sided") : # data are essentially constant I guess the error message is different because your original data rows are floating numbers. Using the rounded dataset, a logical ...


0

Is passing the entire group (as a DataFrame) an option, and then split it inside the function? If you need to reference the actual columns, passing the names can be done: def strange_fun(el, cols): s1 = el[cols[0]] s2 = el[cols[1]] return np.sum(s1) + np.sum(s2) df.groupby('clients')[['odd1', 'odd2']].apply(lambda el: strange_fun(el, ...


1

Try: do.call(rbind, lapply(1:ncol(df1), function(m) USER_FUNCTION(df1[[m]],df2[[m]],x,y,z,l,m)))


2

aa<-data.frame(c(2,12,35)) bb<-data.frame(c(1,2,3,4,5,6,7,15,22,36)) sapply(aa[[1]],function(x)sum(bb[[1]]<x)) # [1] 1 7 9 Some more realistic examples: n <- 1.6e3 bb <- sample(1:n,1.7e6,replace=T) aa <- 1:n system.time(sapply(aa,function(x)sum(bb<x))) # user system elapsed # 14.63 2.23 16.87 n <- 1.6e4 bb <- ...


0

First, some test data: set.seed(123) df <- data.frame(ID = rep(1:3, each = 3), w1_panas1 = runif(9), w1_panas2 = runif(9), w1_panas3 = runif(9), w2_panas1 = runif(9), w2_panas2 = runif(9), w2_panas3 = runif(9), w3_panas1 = runif(9), ...


0

Your data should look like this (or you can quite easily get them in such a format): set.seed(1) df <- data.frame(id = rep(1:10, 12), panas1 = sample(1:500, 120), panas2 = sample(1:300, 120), panas4 = sample(1:700, 120), week = rep(1:12, each=10)) head(df) id panas1 panas2 panas4 week 1 1 133 298 215 1 ...


5

You can use cSplit_e from my "splitstackshape" package, like this: library(splitstackshape) cSplit_e(mydata, "NAMES", sep = ",", type = "character", fill = 0) # ID NAMES NAMES_333 NAMES_4444 NAMES_456 NAMES_765 # 1 1 4444, 333, 456 1 1 1 0 # 2 2 333 1 0 0 0 # 3 3 ...


1

This is just a warning, not an error. A simple web search found: https://www.biostars.org/p/122005/


0

The following is a little convoluted; it was inspired by the cost of creating many single-row data.frames and then rbinding these together. I don't know whether this is more efficient or not (would be interesting to get feedback...). In a first pass I record the 'geometry' of events as they occur geom <- xpathSApply(dd, ...


2

Since first and last names aren't balanced, it seems like you need to be a bit more careful to match them all then just extracting them all at once. Here's some valid test data library(XML) dd<-xmlInternalTreeParse('<people><person personId="1"> <personNames> <personName ...


0

Just as an answer to can I still use the apply to calculate this? If so, how? The answer is yes. You can combine x and grpB into an array and then use apply on the resulting array. # Data set.seed(100) x = matrix(runif(10000,0,1),100,100) grpA = round(runif(100,1,5),0) # Group 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 # function funA <-function(y, A){ X = lm(y~A) ...


2

First off, if your function funA does a lot of work, then using a for loop versus apply won't affect performance that much. This is because the only difference is in the overhead of looping, and most of the work is going to take place inside of funA in either case. In fact, even if funA is simple, for and apply won't be that different performance-wise. ...


0

You could easily use a sequence of the number of columns as an "indicator" or "extracting" variable, and use vapply instead of apply, like this: vapply(sequence(ncol(x)), function(z) funA(x[, z], grpB[, z]), numeric(nrow(x)))


0

This is a pretty confusing question and example. I think you want to produce a different graph for each country value? In that case I'd suggest something like this: library(reshape2) Data_m <- melt(Data, id.vars="country") # melt the data into 'long' format f <- function(d) { # function that produces a graph and waits print(qplot(variable, ...


1

Using TrueSeq from my "SOfun" package (only on GitHub), as also mentioned in my answer to a surprisingly similar question, you could do: library(SOfun) apply(my_array, c(1, 2), function(x) max(tabulate(TrueSeq(as.logical(x))))) # [,1] [,2] # [1,] 3 2 # [2,] 2 3


2

Try this : apply(my_array,c(1,2),function(x){ max(rle(x)$length[rle(x)$values=="1"]) }) # [,1] [,2] #[1,] 3 2 #[2,] 2 3


0

I don't know which is faster (if they are even better than a for loop), but I have two ways to go about it. They both get the "dnm" and then calculate the rate separately. The first is with merge: names(tk)[2] <- 'tkfreq' ng <- merge(ng,tk,by.x = 'w1',by.y = 'word',all.x = T) ng <- merge(ng,tk,by.x = 'w2',by.y = 'word',all.x = T) ...


0

Well, I can't speak for the apply example, but: the reason why your loop appears to be so slow is that you're writing to a data.frame in each iteration. Data.frames are non-primitive objects, and have copy-on-modify semantics. To put that in human: every time you tweak a data.frame what you're actually doing is finding memory for the "new" data.frame, ...


1

Perhaps this is not an answer - but I would suggest a different approach. I will use the package data.table in R. library(data.table) #use own location of your data wave_table=fread(input="F:\\wave.csv"); wave_table # Constituent Name Amplitude Phase Speed # 1: 1 M2 3.264 29.0 28.98 # 2: 2 S2 0.781 51.9 ...


1

If you want to generate all of the values of L(.) for varying values of r and s, a loop-less method might be: rs <- expand.grid(r=r,s=s); rm(r); rm(s) #edit rs$qrs <- with(rs, L(r, s, R, S)^2 ) q <- sum(rs$qrs) I'm not convinced this will be faster. There is a widespread but erroneous notion that loops in R are inefficient. Most of the ...


0

apply returns a matrix which needs to be converted to a zoo object. To insure that the dates in the new zoo series match the dates returned by the TTR function, you could first define a function with the TTR function and any parameters used by it and then use that to produce the new zoo series. The code below defines TTR_fn as SMA with a n=3 to define a ...


2

Try this: sma.prices <- prices sma.prices[] <- apply(prices, 2, SMA)


0

I am not 100% sure what you mean, but I guess that you have some conditions on the columns Date, Delivery Beg, Buy/Sell, and Trader. Lets call these conditions a, b, c, d, and e, respectively. When They are fulfilled you would like to sum the quantity. If so my suggestion would be df.Quantity[(df['Date']==a) & (df['Delivery Beg']==b) & (and so ...


0

I'm not sure you're need rolling sum. Could it be that simple deals.groupby will be enough? like this: df.groupby(['Date', 'Trader', 'Buy/Sell', 'Delivery Beg'])['Quantity'].sum() If you want then get rolling sum, you can use cumsum() function on it. >>> df = pd.read_clipboard(sep=';') >>> df Date Delivery Beg Buy/Sell ...


0

You may also try indxA <- grep("^A", colnames(DF)) indxB <- grep("^B", colnames(DF)) f1 <- function(x,y,z) (x+y)*z DF[sprintf('D_X%02d', indxA)] <- Map(f1 , DF[indxA], DF[indxB], list(DF$Var)) DF # A_X01 A_X02 B_X01 B_X02 C_X01 C_X02 Var D_X01 D_X02 #1 34 2 24 4 34 123 3 174 18 #2 65 4 45 2 65 543 ...


1

Try this indx <- gsub("\\D", "", grep("A_X|B_X", names(DF), value = TRUE)) # Retrieving indexes indx2 <- DF[grep("A_X|B_X", names(DF))] # Considering only the columns of interest DF[paste0("D_X", unique(indx))] <- sapply(unique(indx), function(x) rowSums(indx2[which(indx == x)])*DF$Var) DF # A_X01 A_X02 B_X01 B_X02 C_X01 C_X02 Var D_X01 D_X02 ...


0

Easy to understand Loop: checkBetween = c() for (i in 1 : length(my.df)){ checkBetween <- append(checkBetween, within.range(my.df$pos[i], my.df$start[i], >my.df$end[i])) }


3

No need in apply loops here, just do with(my.df, start <= pos & end >= pos) ## [1] FALSE TRUE TRUE FALSE TRUE If you want to add it as a column, use transform transform(my.df, check.pos = start <= pos & end >= pos) # gene chr pos start end check.pos # 1 A 1 34 45 86 FALSE # 2 B 2 23 15 38 TRUE # 3 ...


1

Maybe this can work : check.pos<-apply(my.df[,3:5],1,function(vec){vec[1] >= vec[2] & vec[1] <= vec[3]}) > check.pos [1] FALSE TRUE TRUE FALSE TRUE


6

How about this: Reduce(function(x,y) (1-y)*(x+10), data$event[-nrow(data)], accumulate=T, init=0)


1

So unfortunately, the apply family of functions only replaces a for loop when the iterations of that loop do not depend on previous iterations. You could write a for loop like: data <- data.frame( index= seq(1:20), event=rep(0,20) ) data$event[10] <- 1 data$event[15] <- 1 print(data) data$start = rep(0, 20) for(i in 2:20){ if(data$event[i] == ...


4

You could get your values with data$start <- 10*(ave( rep(0,nrow(data)), cumsum(c(0, head(data$event,-1))), FUN=seq_along)-1 ) data$end <- data$start + 10 Here we use cumsum to track when events occur (but we need to shift them a step so the reset occurs after the event rather than at the event). And we use ave within the groups to ...


5

After we use select for subsetting the columns that are needed, apply the rowwise() function and then use do. Here . refers to the dataframe that we got after the select step. When we do sum(.>0), it will apply that function on each row of the new dataset. Lastly, we data.frame(., n=..), gets all the previous columns along with the newly created n. df ...


0

apply(df[,-1],2,function(x){ paste(df$Time[which(x==max(x))],collapse=",") }) gives you this : Cell1 Cell2 Cell3 "0.3" "0.4" "0.2,0.4"



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