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37

No one knows much. Last time Paul Graham posted to the Arc forum was here where he indicated that he doesn't care if he produces anything that people "think they want right now" and he doesn't have time to work on Arc. That was a few months ago and it may have been the straw that broke the Arc community's back. Arc is vaporware or abandonware in my ...


36

Um, Paul Graham's better half Jessica has had a baby is what's happened to Arc...


21

In response to this blog post that mentions Arc, Paul Graham (pg) made the following comment on Hacker News (HN) indicating that Arc has not been abandoned by any means: "Eventually, Mr. Graham himself seemed to spurn the language" Imagine how ridiculous this was to read while taking a break from working on HN, surrounded by windows full of ...


20

Writing your own language is, in a sense, empowering: you get to choose what primitives, what kinds of expressions, are convenient to write in that language. In that sense, you can look at a book like On Lisp and see that the core authors of Arc have a strong opinion on what kinds of things they'd like from a language. If I take your question and boil it ...


14

from https://github.com/nex3/arc/blob/master/how-to-run-news (you should perhaps also use this fork which is quite active) To run News: # tar xvf arc3.1.tar # cd arc3.1 # mkdir arc # echo "myname" > arc/admins # mzscheme -f as.scm at the arc prompt: arc> (load "news.arc") arc> (nsv) go to http://localhost:8080 click on login, and ...


14

Arc is not intended to be the next big thing. It is more intended to be the next big thing after the next big thing after the next big thing after the next big thing after the next big thing. In fact, the programmers for whom Arc is intended, haven't even been born yet ... heck, their parents haven't even been born yet! So, cut the guy some slack! Designing ...


11

Directly ripped from http://amix.dk/blog/post/19574 and translated to PHP from the Python: function calculate_score($votes, $item_hour_age, $gravity=1.8){ return ($votes - 1) / pow(($item_hour_age+2), $gravity); }


9

5 hours ago Paul Graham said: I'll probably release a new version later this year. Most of the changes will be in news.arc, which is now pretty solid. Maybe I'll actually make an effort to make it installable without having to understand the source.


9

Last update I'm aware of is here: The baby's sleeping, and I'm hacking. The next release will have more improvements to news.arc than the underlying language, because that's what I've been working on most lately. But I'm going to be focusing more on the language soon.


8

As Joel said, you'll need to bring up Terminal, which is as easy as typing Terminal in spotlight. When terminal comes up, you may need to specify the full path to MzScheme to run it. After my install, it was not automatically added to the PATH. Basically, you'll run: hostname:arc3 user$ /Applications/MzScheme\ v372/bin/mzscheme -f as.scm At the arc> ...


8

Racket is a Scheme dialect while Arc is not. They are both LISP dialects though. Arc reduces the amount of parenthesis and has some fancy built in syntax to make common stuff shorter in code size. examples: ;; scheme (if p1 c1 (if p2 c2 (if p3 c3 a3))) ;; arc simplifies if (if p1 c1 p2 c2 p3 c3 a3) ;; scheme (f1(f2(f3 a b))) ;; ...


7

There's: Compojure (clojure) PLT Scheme Webserver (PLT Scheme) Erlyweb (erlang) Seaside (smalltalk) That list is enough to keep you busy giving a sample of functional languages with different characteristics: Clojure: multi-paradigm?, flexible? it isn't a pure functional language and although it is preferred that you program in a functional style, it ...


7

My initial feeling towards this is "It is too soon to tell" 1) Object-oriented programming is exciting if you have a statically-typed language without lexical closures or macros. To some degree, it offers a way around these limitations. (See Greenspun's Tenth Rule.) Go supports Function literals (see docs) which if I am reading this ...


6

There are write-ups about how this algorithm works. A quick search discovered: How Hacker News ranking algorithm works. Lisp can make things seem more complicated than they really are.


6

For any kind of lisp hosting, you're pretty much on your own. It depends on how serious you are about doing this, and how big the starting community will be. If it's a work thing, talk to your network guy about getting a server provisioned. If it's a personal project, you should really consider a VPS server; something like Linode or Slicehost. Note that ...


5

Try using a begin (scheme) or progn (common lisp) form. It looks like you're using arc, which appears to name this construct do. (mac genexpr (list) `(do ,@(map (fn (c) `(something ,e)) list)))


4

I don't think Paul Graham's goal in designing his new language involves any sort of effort to be "first to market" or caring about backwards compatibility, maintaining a complex implementation, building a community, libraries, testing, etc... It sounds like it's a much longer term process. (And that's fine!)


4

Arc is old. Now it is Factor that is hot. :)


4

Paul has some interesting points, in general, I've read a lot of his musings. In this matter, we disagree. He's a lisp nut, and a crappy program nut. He seems to pawn off hard to understand programs as the work of great programmers. Yes, I realise it's more nuanced than that, but it really boils down to just that. At the end of the day, either your code is ...


4

nex3's branch remains fairly active. http://github.com/nex3/arc/commits/master


4

In answer to the first part of your question ("where do I type this in"), you need to run that command in a shell. As you're using a Mac I think it's a bash shell. Here's a howto on using the shell in Mac/OSX (I don't know how accurate or up to date that is). So, once you've got the shell open you'll type in the command: > mzscheme -m -f as.scm ...


3

There are many Functional Programming Languages (FPL) and they are very different. As are Lisp dialects (like Scheme, Common Lisp, Logo, Arc and others). Often they are not organized around classes (or similar concepts) and classes are often not conflated with namespaces. In some object oriented languages programs are composed of a lot of classes, the ...


3

No, modular programming is quite common in FP as well. The same general principles of modularity apply. In Haskell, for example, you can say import qualified Parsec as P which gives you the Parsec parsing library in the namespace P. Whether modules and namespaces are the "the same thing as namespaces in OOP" depends on your functional language and your ...


3

And picolisp is becoming more interesting. picolisp is the most "arc"-like lisp out there, and is 15-20 years ahead of arc.


3

You can find basic examples using Restas and CL-WHO here (just replace asdf-install with Quicklisp). Personaly, I really like Restas, it's fun and easy to use. And if you have to interact with a PostgreSQL database, Postmodern is the way to go.


2

To me that looked like a lot of hot air. I have also watching whats going on for a while, but am frustrated now. The stuff that came out of it is far from the praises in his essays. But maybe he is simple too busy...


2

Weblocks is a proven object-oriented functional framework that takes inspiration from Seaside. It's written in Common Lisp, and two basic examples (weblocks-demo, simple-blog) can be found here: http://bitbucket.org/S11001001/weblocks-dev/src/tip/examples/


2

The problem is that Arc uses an old version of Racket. The page http://arclanguage.org/install says to use version 372 of MzScheme. You can download version 372 here: http://download.plt-scheme.org/all-versions.html


2

When asked, "This article makes me wonder: status-of-arc?" Paul replied, "I hack a fair amount in it, less on it. I'd hoped to release a new version of News soon, and thus also a new version of Arc. But I am pretty busy with YC." http://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=2926991


2

Have a look at PicoLisp - a production ready version of the hundred year language, now documented in two freely available books on scridb (pdf format): PicoLisp Works, 467 pages PicoLisp by Example, 1372 pages



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