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7

I'm wondering whether you should really do caching here at all, since SQL server is pretty good in caching results, so you should see queries that return a fixed list of drop down values to be really fast. Of course, when you do caching, it depends on the data what the cache duration should be. It depends on how the system is used. For instance, if new ...


5

The patterns have a similar result, but this is almost by coincidence as the intent is different. For me, the main intent of the flyweight is to reduce memory by sharing state. The main intent of multition is to always have the exact same instance (singleton) of an object returned when you use the same key to get the instance. Multition Guarantees that ...


3

Most large-scale job schedulers consider aspects not covered in your document. Some of the key issues are: (in no particular order) Cancellation - you often want to kill a long running job, or prevent one from running. Priority - you often want high priority jobs to run in preference to low priority jobs. But implementing this in a way that low priority ...


2

Yes, it is generally a good practice to abstract your database interactions into a separate layer. It is also good practice to always access the resources via an Interface and using dependency inject to resolve the instances of those objects at runtime. There is no hard and fast rule on this but in professional environments no one is going to be creating ...


2

Why do you have stage and prod in the same database? I have always had three databases, dev, stage, and prod, all with an ID sequence per domain object. This keeps stage and prod physically separated. If nothing else, how else do you allow new database changes to be verified in stage without applying them (untested) to prod?


2

The Fortran 2003 standard introduced the GET_ENVIRONMENT_VARIABLE intrinsic subroutine. A simple form of call would be call GET_ENVIRONMENT_VARIABLE (NAME, VALUE) which will return the value of the variable called NAME in VALUE. The routine has other optional arguments, your favourite reference documentation will explain all. This rather assumes that ...


2

You mention a "special mode", presumably that is opposed to the "normal mode". "Mode" is (or at least can be) a type, which would suggest using the State pattern. However, it doesn't look as though you have any sort of type code in the class to tell whether these 'special' methods should be used, so I'm assuming that there is something outside the class that ...


1

Basically, you need to have a look at the : Von Neumann Architecture The picture on this site provides a good overview on the main components of a PC: http://www.doc.ic.ac.uk/~eedwards/compsys/memory/ However, I'll explain a bit of this stuff with focus on your questions (where does anything reside in relationship to the CPU): CPU CPU: A microchip that ...


1

You can try an additively weighted voronoi diagram. In awvd the weight is substracted from the euklidian distance. Maybe you can use the radius from each as a "weight" and then create the vd. Bigger radius makes smaller cells but it also tends to make one bigger cell with nearby points. You can look for example for stippeling. It also uses a weigthed voronoi ...


1

Injecting the IDbContext like that brakes the main principle of the Domain model which should be responsible for business logic ONLY while retrieving and storing your domain entities is the responsibility of the infrastructure layer. Yes you inject it by interface, hiding the actual implementation but it makes you domain model aware of some storage. Also ...


1

I would do this: 1) Create an interface: interface ISpecialAction { execute() } 2) implement it for every special action: class Activation implements ISpecialAction { setLives() setTime() execute() } 3) delegate in class Game to this classes class Game { specialActivate() { Activation a = new Activation() ...


1

MVC and n-tier architecture are as the name of the last implies ARCHITECTURAL patterns (not even mutualy exclusive). Singleton is a DESIGN pattern. In an application with a certain architecture you can use any number of design patterns, according to the application's use cases. This use cases make one or more design patterns optimal for implementing ...


1

There is no intrinsic function in Fortran for this. A common workaround is to use conditional compilation (through makefile or compiler supported macros) such as here. If you really insist on this kind of solution, you might consider making an external function, e.g., in C. However, since your code is built for a fixed platform (Windows/Linux, not both), the ...


1

I'm also asking myself the same question when starting a new project... In my opinion: Separation in Visual Studio Projects has the benefits: that you do not need to recompile projects that have not been changed. In large projects this may lead to faster compilation times. you can reuse several components by including a former compiled DLL in a different ...


1

The process is different for different operating systems, and indeed differs depending on how a new process is created. Since I'm more familiar with how modern Microsoft OS's handle this, I'll start there, and make a reference to nix's at the end. When the [Microsoft] OS creates a process, it allocates a process environment block to hold data specific to ...


1

On Linux, at least on the architectures I've played with, the process starts with %esp pointing to something like: argc | argv[0] | argv[1] | ... argv[argc - 1] | argv[argc] == NULL | envp[0] | envp[1] ... envp[?] == NULL The first function called is traditionally named _start, and its job is to calculate (argc = %esp, argv = ((char *)%esp) + 1, envp = ...


1

One way is to try research for implementations of Open Blackboard System An open source framework for developing blackboard systems. GBBopen An open source blackboard system framework. KOGMO-RTDB A real-time open source blackboard for C/C++, used by some DARPA Urban Challenge autonomous vehicles. Also can try to find some products of HarTech ...


1

It depends on many factors, Is the size of the your application is not very small? Are you going to use the logic for website only? Mobile application What would change in time? Are you going to change the storage? Are you going to use the same logic across controller actions? Are you going to cover your code with unit/integration tests? Accessing ...


1

Interesting, just answered a similar question... So I woudn't do it I were you. Here's just a few disadvatages of the approach from the top of my head: Performance - a redundant HTTP roundtrip in Web MVC project. Separation of concerns - most of the time the functionality provided by API differs greatly form UI for the same project/application. You might ...


1

Are you using a separate read and write model? If so, perhaps your "projection" classes (the ones that handle events from the write model and do CRUD on the read model) could invalidate the appropriate cache entries at the same time.



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