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1

The serial port settings under Windows can be seen with GetCommState and set with SetCommState. Use the first one to see what the XCTU set. Your code can then use the same settings by calling SetCommState.


0

I'm attempting to convert an arduino sketch to avr assembly. Its somewhat unclear to me what you want to achieve. Do you just want to write Arduino library independent code? I never worked with Arduino, but from what I get it abstracts the actual PORTs / PINs and this is why you are confused? DDRB = 0b11111111; //make all B ports output DDRC = ...


0

For these types of problems I really like to use switch() statements to create a state machine. I would also recommend that you do not use the delay() function at all, but rather calculate how much time has passed since you had last looped. Here is a quick example that I came up with... I apologize if it has any errors in it, I was in a bit of a hurry. If ...


0

The commands that the Arduino IDE uses in the background change often, so the above info is probably out of date. I'm using IDE version 1.6.4 at the moment. To find out the current commands, in the Arduino IDE | File | Preferences, check "Show verbose output during: x compilation x upload". Then you can see the full command in the IDE log window, and adapt ...


0

The simplest way to achieve what you want is splitting loop() function into several small functions, and splitting delays into many small delays. For example to handle your first waiting you need something like this: bool wait50secondsOnHigh() { for (int counter = 0; counter < 5000; counter++) { if (digitalRead(buttonPin) == LOW) ...


0

cin is line-buffered. This means that you only get data when you press enter. And enter is also a character. usually 0x0a or '\n'. And this is not o so your led turns off. What i would do is make your arduino ignore whitespace by: if(incomingByte == `\n` || incomingByte == `\r` || incomingbyte == ' ') return; What also happens is that you send 256 ...


1

since the Arduino Pro Micro operates at a voltage level of 5V like the Uno, it's serial connection also uses 5V. This means the voltage divider circuit shown in your link works also for the Pro Micro. If you want you can do the math on your own: Vout = (R2/(R1+R2)) * Vin Vout is the input voltage at the Rx pin of the RPi Vin is the output voltage of the ...


0

This first val definition isn't necessary. int val = 0; // variable for reading the pin status You are redifining val at the begining of loop() . UPDATE: I think that this is what you want. Your problem is that added buzz function was defined inside loopfunction and you lost some parentesis{}. I just put it out and joined loopcode. ...


0

Once you've initiated turning you probably need to start looking at the front-left sensor value, instead of the back-left. Perhaps continue turning until the front-left is at an appropriately low value, then start moving forwards. You may need to continue to correct steering after turning until the front-left and back-left sensors give the same distance from ...


3

A simple technique is scaling up by multiplying the input value with for example 10000 and putting that result in an int, do the calculations in int, and then scale the output back into a float by dividing with the same factor. In your function you then also need scale up everything with that same factor. The choice of factor depends on the possible ranges ...


0

Serial.print() function will print in the same line. Whatever is suppose to be terminated at the end of the string should go in Serial.println() function. So use: Serial.println("c:send("HTTP/1.1 200 OK")").


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Something along these lines: int result = 0; for (int i = 0; i < 6; i++) if (digitalRead (i + 1) == HIGH) result |= bit (i); if (result < 10) Serial.print ("0"); Serial.println (result); That "ors" in each bit from pins 1 to 6. I used a Serial print there because you didn't give any indication what sort of TFT display you ...


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Using B.putStr instead of print fixed the problem. Thanks to @pat.


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Many issues. 1) don't forget to add break into switch after each case block 2) assignments to PORTA overwrite previous value in this port. I.e. in this construction: PORTA=(0<<PORTA2); //Off RED LED PORTA=(1<<PORTA3); //Glow Green LED PORTA=(0<<PORTA4); //off Blue LED you will have a zero (last line) on all the ...


0

Try to add another \ before the \n, so you'll have something like this: Serial.println(F( c:send(\"HTTP/1.1 200 OK\\r\\n\") ) ) Hope this helps.


0

I fixed it!!!! so I accidentally had the wrong values for anding when writing to the address bus. A TON of thanks to Nick Gammon, test would have failed today without him. more about the answer: I needed to change my for loop in the wrt function, and not skip 512 when writing to the address bus. :D code: digitalWrite(20,HIGH&&(loc&1)); ...


1

You could just receive characters until you receive a "\n" character. Maybe something like this: import Control.Monad (forever) import Control.Applicative ((<$>)) import Data.ByteString.Char8 (unpack) import System.Hardware.Serialport (SerialPort, openSerial, recv) -- Read a character from the serial port. receive :: SerialPort -> IO String ...


0

Although it's a bit ugly, you can simply cast the uint8_t* to a char* and strtok will work fine (at least, on all normal platforms, including Arduino):


1

for(int i=40;i<48;i++) digitalWrite(i,HIGH&&(var&(1<<i))); That is wrong, surely? You are shifting 1 left 40 times at least, which means you are always writing a zero.


0

A good overview of a what you can do with controlTransfer() and FTDI-Chips can be found here ftdi_sio.h. typedef enum { ftdi_8U232AM_48MHz_b300 = 0x2710, ftdi_8U232AM_48MHz_b600 = 0x1388, ftdi_8U232AM_48MHz_b1200 = 0x09c4, ftdi_8U232AM_48MHz_b2400 = 0x04e2, ftdi_8U232AM_48MHz_b4800 = 0x0271, ftdi_8U232AM_48MHz_b9600 = 0x4138, ...


1

Hi try to change your code in loop like this. for (int i = 0; i < n; i++){ digitalWrite(ledPin, HIGH); lcd.clear(); lcd.print(String(n)); Serial.print(n); Serial.flush(); delay(100); digitalWrite(ledPin, LOW); delay(100); } You have to use the method print and passing a string.


0

Without using sms.h you could have done the thing easily by directly sending AT commands to the SIM900 module. Even sms.h does the same but it encapsulates these methods. There could be some mismatch between the module and header. #include <SoftwareSerial.h> SoftwareSerial SIM900(7, 8); void setup() { SIM900.begin(19200); SIM900power(); // ...


0

How about this? #include <avr/io.h> ISR (TIMER0_COMPA_vect) { PIND = (1 << PIND7); // toggle D7 } int main(void) { DDRD = (1 << PORTD7); // set pin D7 to output TCCR0A = 0; TCCR0B = (1 << CS00) | (1 << CS02); // prescaler of 1024 TIMSK0 = (1 << OCIE0A); ...


0

I do not assure you if this is bug-free but you can try this and post your restults here, so that I can debug it for you. Here you go: int motor; int motorpwm = 11; int x = 1; int i; int pwmValue; void setup() { pinMode(11, OUTPUT); pinMode(2, INPUT); //Button connected to Vcc and pulled down using a 10k resistor. Serial.begin(9600); } void loop() { ...


0

Yes, of course. You can use all PWN Pins, 3, 5, 6, 10, 11, 13.


0

Got it, for anyone who needs it : String parseGET=Wificontent; String from="GET /"; String to="HTTP"; int ind1 = parseGET.indexOf(from); int ind2 = parseGET.indexOf(to); Serial.println(parseGET.substring(ind1+from.length(), ind2-1));


0

Prolly old news, but typedef struct allows member functions (at least in IDE 1.6.4). Depending on what you want to do, of course, but I can't think of any func(struct *p) that couldn't be handled also with object.func(param pdata). Just that something like p->a = 120; becomes something like object.setA(120); typedef struct { byte var1; byte var2; ...


0

your subscribe topic "testq" must be in an array like char testq[] = {'t', 'e', 's', 't', 'q', '\0'}; be sure to finisht your array with an ,'\0' Then you subscribe with: client.subscribe(testq);


0

The status code is on the first line of the HTTP response (from the server to the client). An example response might be: HTTP/1.1 200 OK Content-Type: text/plain Connection: close Some text here. If you are writing client code then you should parse the first line of the response from the server, looking for that number. One method would be to gather the ...


1

You want the file: optiboot_atmega328.hex It is in the optiboot folder under bootloaders. The normal fuses are: low: FF high: DE extended: 05 Optiboot is the 512 byte bootloader, normally installed on the Uno chips. As you can see from the datasheet, a high fuse of DE gives a bootloader size of 256 words (that is, 512 bytes). And the relevant ...


0

I would use a command line interface with python, but I know you would prefer C# or java. If you want to make a graphical interface use java, but I do not know much about C#, only C++. if they are alike with the libraries, then use C# for a command line interface like on linux. first answer on stack overflow, hope I did OK, good luck with your project!


0

Try both and use the one you like, I like C# because most of my work is around for Windows 7 or above and I love Visual Studio + Resharper.


1

And i suggest this should do the job as good as the namespace option? struct motor { int EN; /*some more ints*/ }; int drive (motor* mtr); motor mot1; motor mot2; /*this works with no compile error*/ int drive (motor* mtr) { return 1; } void setup() {} void loop() { int a = drive(&mot1); }


4

Because the road to hell is paved with good intentions. The Arduino IDE tries to be helpful by generating prototypes for all user-defined functions at the beginning of the code. When one of these prototypes references a user-defined type, things blow up in the manner described. The trick is to make the code unparseable by the IDE: namespace { int drive ...


0

EDIT: My original answer made some assumptions that Arduino IDE was closer to AVR-GCC than it actually was. My general recommendation for anyone who is familiar with C or C++ that is doing a lot of work with these chips is to use Atmel studio and AVR-GCC directly as you will run into less issues this way. Arduino is actually C++ underneath but it does some ...


0

I did it like this: // RFID Includes #include <SPI.h> #include <MFRC522.h> // RFID Defines #define RST_PIN 9 #define SS_PIN 10 const int NO_CARD_DETECTIONS_BEFORE_NEW_READ = 40; MFRC522 mfrc522(SS_PIN, RST_PIN); // Create MFRC522 instance int noCardCount = 0; void setup() { // This is for Trinket 5V 16MHz #if defined ...


0

Thank you @hoijui, I ended up just copying the rxtxSerial.dll to the same directory that the exe is run from and now it works. This directory also includes the RXTXcomm.jar as well. When making the exe in Launch4J I made a custom class path: The "Main Class" I selected the jar I made from eclipse, then for the class path I added: echo %CD%\RXTXcomm.jar ...


3

You do not need a class if all you want is a few functions, however if you want to learn the method, I can point you in the right direction. Here is a simple library. We'll call it LED. In this example we will recreate the blink example (included in IDE) using a library. It is obviously more work than the example uses, however comparing the two should ...


0

Apparently your logic seems to be fine. The hints from frarugi87 may make it more stable. While using the BlueToothChat example code in past I faced similar issue. The root cause identified was : The statement bytes = mmInStream.read(buffer); is a blocking call. It returns to next line only after receiving some data over BlueTooth. The time between two ...


0

Okey I solved this problem by putting a delay in my read() method.


0

Instead of using any library. You can try iframe tag with src to your 'node.js' view.html. So, listen for events on view.html which are triggered from your 'cakephp' view.html So, you will have cakephp->view.html talking to node.js->view.html which is connected to node.js->index.js(server)


0

You can use std::string::c_str() function, which returns a pointer to a const char buffer: String card = "2-3d-fg-d6-12-68-32-3f-35-45-42-53-2a-3"; char *prefix = "GET /insert.php?card="; char *postfix ="&error=1 HTTP/1.1\r\nHost: testsite.com\r\n\r\n"; String url = prefix +card+ postfix; const char *url_complete = url.c_str(); //... See also the ...


0

From Eclipse > Properties of project > Environment > add the variable A.RUNTIME.TOOLS.AVR-GCC.PATH You could use XDAQ that provides a scientific ecosystem of powerfull tools with Arduino IDE + Eclipse Luna C++. See more here: XDAQ


1

Strings in C are null terminated. Try char signals[9]; for ... } signals[8] = 0; delay...


0

I tried this very simple code (cr = carriage return) Serial.write(13); And because the next "printed" caracters will feed the residual text, it's ok.


0

In Arduino all primitives can be both signed and unsigned just by adding unsigned in front of the definiton unsigned int example; unsigned char example;


0

In Arduino you'll need the IDE version 1.5 and higher. This will allow you to access platform.txt where you can set the command line parameters pointed out by Meixner. In 1.5.7 I found it here: {ArduinoInstall}\arduino-1.5.7\hardware\arduino\avr\platform.txt There are two entries: compiler.c.flags & compiler.cpp.flags where you can add the switch ...


1

In C 'char' can be both signed or unsigned. Whether it is signed or unsigned depends on the compiler and/or compiler settings. In your case just provide -funsigned-char when invoking the compiler. Doing so 'signed char' will be signed, 'unsigned char' and 'char' will both be unsigned


0

It worked by using following line: Process p; p.runShellCommand("curl -H \"Content-Type: application/json\" -X POST -d '{\"name\":\"arduino\",\"value\":\"15\"}' http://localhost:1234/temp");


1

The Arduino sends \r\n when using println. When you compare, it fails as you are comparing "Hello, world!\r" with "Hello, world!". You can solve this by using Serial.print() and manually adding an \n to your strings or sending a Serial.write('\n'); after your text (repetition can be replaced with a helper function).



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