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Rails 4 answer Given you have: class Component < ActiveRecord::Base has_many :bugs end class Bug < ActiveRecord::Base belongs_to :component belongs_to :project scope :open, ->{ where( open: true) } scope :closed, ->{ where( open: false) } end You have two possibilities: class Project < ActiveRecord::Base has_many :bugs ...


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The simplest way without additional gem is to concat a string and execute it in one SQL insertion (http://www.electrictoolbox.com/mysql-insert-multiple-records/). @email = ["a@b.com", "c@d.com", "e@f.com"] values = [] time = Time.current.to_s(:db) @email.each do |email| values.push("('#{email}', '#{time}', '#{time}')") end sql = "INSERT INTO contacts ...


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SQL Statements can be chained together. So if you have your subset, you can then perform additional queries with it. my_subset = Device.where(family: "Phone") # SQL: SELECT * FROM Device WHERE `family` = "Phone" my_results = my_subset.where(style: "Touchscreen") # SQL: SELECT * FROM Device WHERE `family` = "Phone" AND `style` = "Touchscreen" Which can ...


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This is the line in your question that I don't understand: This causes issues though with both of the calls, as limit limits the results of the query, not the database rows that the query is performed on. This is not a Rails thing, this is a SQL thing. Device.limit(n) runs SELECT * FROM device LIMIT n Limit always returns a subset of the queried ...


-2

You could specifically ask for a set of IDs: Device.where(id: (1..4).to_a) That will construct a WHERE clause like: WHERE id IN (1,2,3,4)


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This is an alternative approach. It has the disadvantage of using two sql queries instead of one, but I would suggest it is much more maintainable code: places = Place.arel_table leam = Service.joins(:places).where(places[:place_name].matches('%leam%') wark = Service.joins(:places).where(places[:place_name].matches('%wark%') leam.where(id: ...


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well as far as I understood, you wish to select all record, which range have an intersection to the specified one? If so, just select records, which have start_at field values that are before the end of range, and have finish_at field values that are after the begin of range. So with arel it should be: scope :in_range, proc do |begin_time, end_time, ...


3

merge actually doesn't work like OR it's simply intersection (AND) I struggled with this problem to combine to ActiveRecord::Relation objects into one and I didn't found any working solution for me. Instead of searching for right method creating an union from these two sets, I focused on algebra of sets. You can do it in different way using De Morgan's ...


0

Assuming Service is associated to Place through a has_many :through relationship 'places', have you tried: places = Place.arel_table Service.joins(:places).where( places[:place_name].matches('%leam%').or( places[:place_name].matches('%war%')) )


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as in Arel is mostly used to specify names for specific fields in SELECT-clause (roughly speaking, presented in Arel as project), table aliases are typically handled in a different way. The problem is, that in your working example you have the table objects you're referencing your fields from. You built subqueries with them. You have to build your subquery ...


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class Sale < ActiveRecord::Base scope :with_payment, joins( :payment ) scope :without_payment, Sale.all - Sale.with_payment end


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Unfortunately no. That being said, the reason you try to use Arel functionality is to avoid database dependent SQL functionality (e.g. Postgres and Mysql have different date handling functions). LENGTH(), on the other hand, is a standard SQL function, and you won't have problems with portability of that query. tl;dr - Using custom SQL for everything is ...


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Do your tests pass with: Expression.where(library_id:[1,2,3]).where(account_id: [1337, nil])


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Your query wouldn't work as it is written, even without the pluck call. Reason being, your WHERE clause includes literal SQL referencing the users table which Rails doesn't notice and decides to use multiple queries and join in memory ( .preload() ) instead of joining in the database level ( .eager_load() ): SELECT * from published_posts WHERE users.name ...


0

Since ruby-on-rails-2 the joins operation is used in all cases before the includes operation during performance, but since includes uses LEFT OUTER JOIN operator, you should use exactly it. May be you need also to use not LEFT, but FULL join. So try this with arel gem: class Post scope :with_token(token), -> do |token| re = ...


0

Why not do this: Post.includes(:tags).where(Tag.arel_table[:title].matches('%token%').or(Tag.arel_table[:post_id].eq(nil)))


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Something like this: Post.includes(:tags).where( "tags.title LIKE ?", "%#{token}%" ) could work. (The syntax might be a little wrong, sorry, but you get the idea)


1

Firstly, from the question tags, I have assumed that you are using Rails3 (had it been Rails4, there were more easy ways of doing things :)) For your requirement above (ie grab all the parties that do not have any invitations, or any that have all of the invitations "unanswered"), here is a way of doing it (using scope :unattended): Party Model: class ...


2

The query: scope :not_confirmed, lambda { find_by_sql( "SELECT * FROM `parties` INNER JOIN `invitations` ON `invitations`.`party_id` = `parties`.`id` WHERE (invitations.status = 'unanswered') OR (parties.id NOT IN (SELECT DISTINCT(party_id) FROM invitations))" ) } can be converted to arel with some transformation using boolean algebra too. But since it ...


1

An update to the Arel gem broke migrations in Rails 4 beta. See here for details. The tutorial has already been updated with the fix.



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