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59

If all these parameters are meaningfully related, pack them in a structure.


45

I found all the other answers long and complicated, so I created this simple diagram to explain the way Python treats variables and parameters.


30

*args and **kwargs notation *args (typically said "star-args") and **kwargs (stars can be implied by saying "kwargs", but be explicit with "double-star kwargs") are common idioms of Python for using the * and ** notation. These specific variable names aren't required (e.g. you could use *foos and **bars), but a departure from convention is likely to enrage ...


28

Put them in a struct Create a structure struct GenerateScriptParams { /* ... */ }; and put all the parameters in there. You can actually provide default values for the initialization of the struct as well by implementing a default constructor or, in C++11, by providing default initialization of individual members. You can then change the values that are ...


12

I personally do not believe that moving all the arguments in one struct will make the code much better. You just move dirt under the carpet. When you are going to deal with the creation of the struct you have the same problem. The question is how much reusable this struct will be? If you end up with a 18 parameters for one function call something it is not ...


11

The rules for C are that parameters must be passed by value. A compiler converts from one language (with one set of rules) to a different language (potentially with a completely different set of rules). The only limitation is that the behaviour remains the same. The rules of the C language do not apply to the target language (e.g. assembly). What this means ...


10

Or you could use a fluent interface. It would look like this: script my_script(mandatory, parameters); my_script.net(true).tv(false).phone(true); This is applicable if you have default values for your specified parameters or it is allowed to have a partially constructed script.


7

When we talk about components, we talk about OOPs and its concepts. When we talk about OOPs, we also talk about encapsulation. Though your first method will work, it breaks encapsulation. Object methods should be oblivious of outside world. Hence, the 2nd method is the right approach. Sometime there are some challenges, where you are needed to take approach ...


7

Use your header files correctly. Configure your compiler to emit as many warnings as possible. Mind the warnings! add.h #ifndef ADD_H_INCLUDED #define ADD_H_INCLUDED int add(int a, int b, int c); #endif add.c #include "add.h" int add(int a, int b, int c) { return a + b + c; } file.c #include "add.h" void foo() { add(1, 2); }


6

Define global constants: ACCURACY = 1e-3 NSTEP = 10 def f(accuracy=ACCURACY, nstep=NSTEP): ... def g(accuracy=ACCURACY, nstep=NSTEP): f(accuracy, nstep) If f and g are defined in different modules, then you could make a constants.py module too: ACCURACY = 1e-3 NSTEP = 10 and then define f with: from constants import ACCURACY, NSTEP def ...


6

Ignoring the possibility or desirability of changing the function or program in some way as to reduce the number of parameters... I have seen coding standards that specify how long parameter lists should be formatted, for cases where refactoring is not possible. One such example is using double indentations and one parameter per line (Not for all functions ...


6

First thing that comes to mind: if [a, b, c, d].count(True) > 1:


5

Optional parameters are in the wish list, but they aren't in the language yet, AFAIK. What you obviously can do is making two functions fn function(x: int) -> int {function_with_expr (x, |n|n*n)} fn function_with_expr(x: int, expr: |int| -> int) -> int That's the approach used in the standard library. You can also pass a special trait into ...


5

C does, by design, not allow a single function to accept more than a single type for each argument. There are various ways to do something equivalent in C, though: First and foremost, you can just write multiple different functions that do the same, but on different types. For instance, instead of add you could have three functions named add_int, add_char ...


5

Simply use a lambda: template<typename O> void f(int& i, O op){ op(i); } int main() { int i; f(i,[] (int& x) { ++x; }); f(i,[] (int& x) { --x; }); return 0; } Also it is not clear whether you want post- or preincrement. As noted by @T.C. if you want to keep the semantics of the normal operator you can add the return ...


5

*j-- is the same as *(j--), but you want (*j)--. Since you're coding in C++, why not pass by reference instead of using pointers?


5

std::set<double, EpsCompare<> > myEpsSet(EpsCompare<>(1e-5)); or std::set<double, EpsCompare<double> > myEpsSet(EpsCompare<double>(1e-5));


5

@CFML_Developer has given a good answer. To build on that a bit... OO theory has a sound basis in reality here (like it usually does, that said). Breaking encapsulation and burrowing out into a function's calling context for its "inputs" pretty much locks the function into being used in that one context. Your function requires that client variable to exist, ...


5

Any controller can call any model if it can create the object of particular model. In Yii one model is for one table not for one controller. But we can use multiple tables in a single model.


5

Using auto for the variable declaration in a range-based for loop is nearly always wrong. It is only ever correct if the range is guaranteed to use built-in object which are not mutated. I would not normally use auto here (to be fair, I would also not range-based for in the first place but prefer an algorithm). Using auto& constraints the result of *it ...


5

You can the the dict with variables using locals(). For example: class Foo(object): def __init__(self, a=1, b=2): inputs = locals() del inputs['self'] # remove self variable print(inputs) f = Foo() Results in print out: {'b': 2, 'a': 1}


5

Calling a function with to few arguments leads to undefined behavior as the value of those arguments will be indeterminate.


5

C linker doesn't compare arguments while linking. That is correct. Unlike C++ linker which considers argument types to be part of a function signature, C linker considers only function names. That is why it is possible to create a situation with undefined behavior simply by supplying a wrong function prototype the way that you show. what is the good ...


5

No, you're slightly wrong. void specifies that there is abosolutely no arguments passed. empty parenthesis () indicates that the function can be called with any number of arguments, without generating a warning. Note: Remember, there is no prototype defined or supplied by the implementation for main(). Maybe, C11 standard, chapter 5.1.2.2.1, describes ...


5

Actually, I just compiled this function using GCC: int foo(int x) { goo(&x); return x; } And it generated this code: _foo: pushl %ebp movl %esp, %ebp subl $24, %esp leal 8(%ebp), %eax movl %eax, (%esp) call _goo movl 8(%ebp), %eax ...


4

the ... is the notation used to denote variable argument list. This is used in Variadic function. It means, after the fmt, any number of arguments of any type can be passed to err_syserr() function. Famous Example: printf(), scanf().


4

The C programming language mandates that arguments are passed by value. So any modification of an argument (like an x++; as the first statement of your foo) is local to the function and does not propagate to the caller. Hence, a general calling convention should require copying of arguments at every call site. Calling conventions should be general enough ...


4

Replace interface{} with int and it will work. Or, more to the point, try to find a solution to your original problem using the features Go provides, instead of trying to force a solution from a different paradigm.


4

I see what you're trying to do, some templates, right? But this is not going to work this way. Your f func(a interface{}, b interface{}) argument is not an interface, so it must be of the matching type. You could achieve what you want by passing f interface{} and then manipulate it with reflect package. Some naive example: package main import ( "fmt" ...


4

You can't just "cast" a char* pointer to an int and expect it to be magically converted. That is just printing the address of the first element of the array. You need to convert it to an int with a runtime function such as atoi(argv[2]) See function details here



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