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1

The simple reason is that you can turn a value of a deduced type to use reference semantics, e.g., by passing std::ref(x) instead of x to the function. Obviously, for things which have more interesting operations than a function call operator you may need to use a custom wrapper but in general it is straight forward to write a wrapper for a class which give ...


2

Since C++11, you already just could do std::vector<double> v1{1}, v2{2}, v3{3, 4}; std::vector<std::vector<double>> v {v1, v2, v3}; But if you want to do a function for that, you may use variadic template: template <typename T, typename ...Ts> std::vector<T> make_vector(const T& arg, const Ts&... args) { return ...


0

You must use an NSInvocation to handle any non-id arguments or return values: CGRect rect = CGRectMake(104, 300, 105, 106); UIView *view = [[UIView alloc] init]; NSMethodSignature *methodSig = [view methodSignatureForSelector:@selector(setFrame:)]; NSInvocation *invocation = [NSInvocation invocationWithMethodSignature:methodSig]; invocation.target = view; ...


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Yes, with keyword argument unpacking: def func(one=None, two=None, three=None, four=None): return (one, two, three, four) params = ("one", "two", "three", "four") for var in params: tmp = func(**{var: "!!"}) print(tmp) Output: ('!!', None, None, None) (None, '!!', None, None) (None, None, '!!', None) (None, None, None, '!!')


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in the use case you give, typename O is a unary function with no state, which can be modelled with a simple function pointer: #include <iostream> int& increment(int& i) { ++i; return i; } int& decrement(int& i) { --i; return i; } template<typename O> void f(int& i, O op){ op(i); } using namespace std; ...


0

Here is one option (there are many possible solutions) that also works pre-C++11: enum OpType { increment, decrement }; template <OpType op> void f(int &i); template<> void f<increment>(int &i) { ++i; } template<> void f<decrement>(int &i) { --i; } Usage: f<increment>(i); To keep your codebase tidy you ...


5

Simply use a lambda: template<typename O> void f(int& i, O op){ op(i); } int main() { int i; f(i,[] (int& x) { ++x; }); f(i,[] (int& x) { --x; }); return 0; } Also it is not clear whether you want post- or preincrement. As noted by @T.C. if you want to keep the semantics of the normal operator you can add the return ...


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I saw a couple other solutions, but I think they won't work if you. For example, provide C:\Program Files\file.dat as command-line argument. Then it will not work, as you only take args[0] when creating a new file. So you should actually do something like the following, join all parts of the given argument and then make a file from it: import java.io.File; ...


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var funX= function (a, b, d, c, f, e, h) { return funX.length; }; This code will return no of parameters passed to a function


1

You can pass pretty much anything as a void * in a function that will add this content to a linked list by the use of memcpy (or even safe memmove). As long as you have a pointer to the next node of your list, you don't have to worry about the type of the stored data. Just be sure not to dereference a void *, but rather to cast it and use this casted ...


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C does, by design, not allow a single function to accept more than a single type for each argument. There are various ways to do something equivalent in C, though: First and foremost, you can just write multiple different functions that do the same, but on different types. For instance, instead of add you could have three functions named add_int, add_char ...


1

You said you used lambdas, did you try this self.ui.button1.clicked.connect(lambda:test(True)) self.ui.button2.clicked.connect(lambda:test(False)) This should work.


0

What if you were to make a class that represents your parameters, ie: public class Component { public string Name { get; set; } public Dictionary<string, object> Parameters { get; set; } public object this[string key] { get { return this.Parameters[key]; } set { ...


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For the benefit of people who stumble on this question while looking for a way to do memoization in python, I recommend fastache. It works on python 2 and 3, is faster than any of the methods described above, and gives the option to limit cache size so that it does not inadvertently get too big: from fastcache import clru_cache @clru_cache(maxsize=128, ...


2

Fortran does not specify details of how function and subroutine arguments are passed, but it does require that if a procedure modifies an intent(out) or intent(inout) argument then the changes will be visible to the caller after the procedure returns. It is common for compilers to implement this requirement by passing arguments by reference, but that is not ...


2

In C# the parameter are passed by value. This mean that when you pass a parameter to a method, a copy of the parameter is passed. C# have types by value (like int) and by reference (like any class). C# contains an stack (when push all varaibles) and a Heap. The value of the value types are pushing directly in this stack, while the reference of the reference ...


4

List like all reference types, is passed as a reference to the object, and not a copy of it. Note that this is very different from saying it is passed by reference, as that would imply assignment of the parameter propagates to the caller, which it does not It does means that modifications to the object (such as those performed by RemoveAt) will ...


0

I'm not sure if it's all of your problems, but you are passing i by value, and needs to be passed by reference for how your using it. void KeyIntoArrByData(AVL_node<Dat,Key,OS>* root, Key** array, int &i)


1

You can use valid4j with hamcrest-matchers instead (found on Maven Central as org.valid4j:valid4j) For preconditions and postconditions: import static org.valid4j.Assertive.*; this.myField = require(argument, notNullValue()); this.myInteger = require(x, greaterThan(0)); ... return ensure(result, isValid()); For input validation: import static ...



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