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0

There's a solution to help you archive this. Let me start from line 3 of your code: <c:out value="${nn}"></c:out> <% Number number = (Number) pageContext.getAttribute("nn"); // create your java bean here and set the number variable to the bean // after that you can do whatever you want with your bean %>


0

Can you place the Super class Record also in your question? Probably, you need to check the super constructor, which is differing from your sub class constructor.


0

To the first question: There is no variable cost within addSession(). If you have not defined an attribute cost within Session then this is the problem. To the second question: I am not quite sure that I understand your problem correctly. You have an int[] values and want to know, whether a given int x is within that array? If so, you can achieve this with ...


2

Assuming you live in the future, the right way to do this is to just unpack the tuple into the middle of the argument list, like this: a('piyush', '23', *f('12', 'abc'), '123') Unfortunately, you, the OP, probably don't live in the future, so this is largely only helpful for people who find this answer after September 2015 (or are willing to require a ...


2

You could also change the order of arguments in the signature: def a(name, age, id, words, phone): name = name age=age id=id words=words phone=phone print name+age+id+words+phone a("piyush", "23", 123, *f("12","123")) piyush23123123hello This way you can unpack the returned values directly when calling the function. Note, ...


3

You have two options*; either explicitly unpack the function result first: id, words = f('12', 'abc') a('piyush', '23', id, words, '123') or use tuple unpacking within the call to a, and supply the last parameter by keyword: a('piyush', '23', *f('12', 'abc'), phone='123') If this syntax is unfamiliar, see What does ** (double star) and * (star) do for ...


2

Quotes, quotes, quotes and more quotes. And prefer $() to backticks, that saves some quoting problems. #!/bin/bash SET() { wz1=$(./PREP2.sh "$1" "$2" '[0-9A-Za-z]*') wz2=$(./PREP2.sh "$1" "$2" '&') echo "$wz1" echo "$wz2" } SET "$1" "$2" (BTW: it's unusual to have function names all uppercase. That's usually for environment variables.)


4

You can run this as: other_function(name, phone, some_function("abcd")[0], age) There is no need to define the additional if statements, wrapper functions etc, since you want to pass only the first element of the tuple which is returned from the original function. For the general case, this becomes: other_function(name, phone, ...


3

I think that procedural paradigm narrows your vision to that problem. Here are some solutions I found using other Python features. Object-oriented programming You're calling f() and g() with same subset of parameters -- this is good hint that these parameters represent same entity. Why not to make it an object? class FG: def __init__(self, ...


3

Dovetailing with @unutbu: If you are using a package structure: mypackage | +- __init__.py | +- fmod.py | +- gmod.py | ... then in __init__.py put your constants as @unutbu suggests: ACCURACY = 1e-3 NSTEP = 10 __all__ = ['ACCURACY', 'NSTEP'] then in fmod.py from mypackage import * def f(accuracy=ACCURACY, nstep=NSTEP): ... and gmod.py and any ...


1

My favorite, kwargs! def f(**kwargs): kwargs.get('accuracy', 1e-3) .. def g(**kwargs): f(**kwargs) Of course, feel free to use the constants as described above.


6

Define global constants: ACCURACY = 1e-3 NSTEP = 10 def f(accuracy=ACCURACY, nstep=NSTEP): ... def g(accuracy=ACCURACY, nstep=NSTEP): f(accuracy, nstep) If f and g are defined in different modules, then you could make a constants.py module too: ACCURACY = 1e-3 NSTEP = 10 and then define f with: from constants import ACCURACY, NSTEP def ...


0

In general (i.e. most languages), you can pass by value or pass by reference. It will depend on the definition of the function and its 'signature'; i.e. the way it and its arguments are declared. Pass-by-value is like an assignment and, if copying a larger structure, it will take longer. Also, the function only receives a copy, so you can make changes to ...


1

Sometimes it helps to write it this way: void function1(char* string, Statistics* statistic){ The variable statistic is a pointer to Statistics, not the Statistics itself. If you did this in function1: function1(string1, &statistic); You would be passing a pointer to (because of the &) a pointer to (because of the * in the declaration) ...


4

Because &statistic (in function1()) is the memory address of the pointer, not the address contained by the pointer. The type of &statistic is Statistics** in function1(). Few words about pointers Let's say we define the following variables: char c = 'a'; char *p_c = &c; Now, we will print the values and memory addresses of p_c and c: ...


0

$("a").click(function() { alert($(this).attr("id")); ... }); i can say this same..


1

It is in part a legacy from pre-standard C, when things were more lax. For example, the code predates function prototypes. Actually, those structures all have 2 things in common: The first field is a uint8_t and gives the length of the structure. The second field is a sa_family_t that identifies which structure type is in use. The C standard says: ...


1

The one thing the structures have in common is that they all start with a family field (the len field is not present on all platforms) that is at the same offset and size for all sockaddr_... types. That field, coupled with the socket's actual address type (established by socket() or accept()) is enough for each function to validate the size and format of ...


4

You can use lua_gettop() for determining the number of arguments passed to a C Lua function: int lua_gettop (lua_State *L); Returns the index of the top element in the stack. Because indices start at 1, this result is equal to the number of elements in the stack (and so 0 means an empty stack). static int idiv(lua_State *L) { if (lua_gettop(L) != ...


-1

This is kind of a meta-answer. I read all the other answers, comments, questions on this on StackOverflow and was horribly confused by the terminology like "call-by-object", "pass by assignment" etc. There's also some kind of FUD about Python being "different than other languages". So here's my summary. 1) For people that know Java, Python variables ...


4

As you said: The problem that I'm having with that is that I don't know how to properly pass this to the original method, to be honest. In order to change function scope (this) there are two Function Prototype methods, called call() and apply() References to documentation of these two methods: Function.prototype.call() Function.prototype.apply() ...


0

You don't need to pass the array index in the function definition. Just simply write char BinaryToHex(char b[]). Check out it will work.


0

You need function declaration before you call it, so put additional row on the top e.g. char BinaryToHex(char b[4]); char *ConvertCodeToHex(char code[16]) { char nibble[4]; char hexvalue[4]; int i;int j,k = 0; for(i=0; code[i] != '\0'; i++) { if((i+5)%4 == 0) ...


0

You need to add a function forward declaration as char BinaryToHex(char b[4]); before ConvertCodeToHex(). Otherwise, when BinaryToHex() is called from ConvertCodeToHex(), you compilar won't be knowing the function description.


1

EDIT: Updated to parametize the options. Here is something using object composition: class Pork(object): def __init__(self, name, mult): self.name = name self.mult = mult @property def bar(self): return self.name * self.mult def __repr__(self): return self.name class Foo(object): def __init__(self, ...


0

If you want to insist on there being at least one argument then you should assert that the args tuple is not empty >>> def get_property(*args): ... assert (args != ()), "There must be at least one argument" ... print(args) ... >>> get_property('a') ('a',) >>> get_property('a', 'b') ('a', 'b') >>> get_property() ...


0

This should do what you need: def getProperty(self,x, *key): key = (x,)+key return {k:self.__properties[k] for k in key if k in self.__properties}


1

Python’s pass-by-assignment scheme isn’t quite the same as C++’s reference parameters option, but it turns out to be very similar to the argument-passing model of the C language (and others) in practice: Immutable arguments are effectively passed “by value.” Objects such as integers and strings are passed by object reference instead of by copying, but ...


5

You can the the dict with variables using locals(). For example: class Foo(object): def __init__(self, a=1, b=2): inputs = locals() del inputs['self'] # remove self variable print(inputs) f = Foo() Results in print out: {'b': 2, 'a': 1}


-1

It's possible, but requires a little tweak to your code: class Foo(object): def __init__(self, **inputs): # Have to set your defaults in here inputs['a'] = inputs.get('a', 1) inputs['b'] = inputs.get('b', 2) # Now the rest of your code, as you expected self.bar(**inputs) def bar(self, *args, **kwargs): ...


2

The argv[2] variable is a string pointer (char* to be precise). So casting it to int will just give you the numerical value of this pointer (or part of it, depending on the size of the addresses on your system). And this is exactly your "random long number" that you are seeing. In order to convert the string to a number you can use functions like atoi.


4

You can't just "cast" a char* pointer to an int and expect it to be magically converted. That is just printing the address of the first element of the array. You need to convert it to an int with a runtime function such as atoi(argv[2]) See function details here


0

You can't do it with only patterns, you'll have to write some code apart from the pattern. Try this: public static String plusOut(String input, String word) { StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder(); Pattern pattern = Pattern.compile(Pattern.quote(word)); Matcher matcher = pattern.matcher(input); int start = 0; ...


0

You cannot place arguments inside the regex pattern. You can create a regex object by concatenating variables with the regex pattern parts like this: public String plusOut(String str, String word) { if(str.matches(".*("+ word + ".*" + word + "){1,}.*") || str.matches(".*(" + word + ".*" + word + ".*" + word + "){1,}.*")) { return ...


0

You need to concatenate it using + operator of Java if(str.matches("<"+word+">")){ // Now word will be replaced by the value //do Anything }


5

Using auto for the variable declaration in a range-based for loop is nearly always wrong. It is only ever correct if the range is guaranteed to use built-in object which are not mutated. I would not normally use auto here (to be fair, I would also not range-based for in the first place but prefer an algorithm). Using auto& constraints the result of *it ...


0

It all depends what you want to do and what a type of T is. You should use: for (auto elem : arg) { // do stuff } when T is a primitive type (cheap to copy) and you do not want to modify the 'arg' collection. You should use: for (auto& elem : arg) { // do stuff } if you want to modify the 'arg' collection. You should use: for (const ...


0

This entirely depends on what's in the container. If the container's values are large, heavyweight objects, using a reference would be better because it avoids making a copy of it. On the other hand, if a container's values are just small values, especially native datatypes, an explicit copy will encourage better compiler optimization, since the compiler ...


0

You can also get around this by quoting. You can pass a char array and then execute it within the function. This string might contain the name of a defined function or a direct definition.



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