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28

The __getitem__() and keys() methods will suffice: >>> class D: def keys(self): return ['a', 'b'] def __getitem__(self, key): return key.upper() >>> def f(**kwds): print kwds >>> f(**D()) {'a': 'A', 'b': 'B'}


15

You can unpack a tuple or a list into positional arguments using a star. def add(a, b, c): print(a, b, c) x = (1, 2, 3) add(*x) Similarly, you can use double star to unpack a dict into keyword arguments. x = { 'a': 3, 'b': 1, 'c': 2 } add(**x)


8

If you're trying to create a Mapping — not just satisfy the requirements for passing to a function, then you really should inherit from collections.Mapping. As described in the documentation, you need to implement: __getitem__ __len__ __iter__ __contains__ The Mixin will implement everything else for you: __contains__, keys, items, values, get, __eq__, ...


8

One solution is to create a comma-separated list out of your vector of subscripted indices inds. You can do this by converting it to a cell array using NUM2CELL, then using the {:} syntax when indexing A: inds = num2cell(inds); value = A(inds{:});


7

When you define your function using this syntax: def someFunc(*args) for x in args print x You're telling it that you expect a variable number of arguments. If you want to pass in a List (Array from other languages) you'd do something like this: def someFunc(myList = [], *args) for x in myList: print x Then you can call it with ...


6

print is not a function in Python 2.x. In the first snippet you are printing a tuple and the last one has invalid syntax. If you want to use the print function, you need to enable it via from __future__ import print_function.


6

You can use a vararg syntax similar to C: package main import "fmt" func my_func( args ...int) int { sum := 0 for _,v := range args { sum = sum + v } return sum; } func main() { arr := []int{2,4} sum := my_func(arr...) fmt.Println("Sum is ", sum) } Now you can sum as many things as you'd like. Notice the important ... ...


5

If you don't want to use __future__, you can define the logging function like this: def log(condition, *message): if(<do something here...>): print ' '.join(str(a) for a in message) <perhaps do something more...>


5

I think you mean the * unpacking operator: >>> l = [1,2,3,4,5] >>> def add(a,b,c,d,e): ... print(a,b,c,d,e) ... >>> add(*l) 1 2 3 4 5


5

machineSpecificEnvironment = Environment(**keys)


4

Python lists (which are not just arrays because their size can be changed on the fly) are normal Python objects and can be passed in to functions as any variable. The * syntax is used for unpacking lists, which is probably not something you want to do now.


3

It can be better understood with another function signature >>> def func(*args, **kw): print(args, kw) >>> func(1, b = 3, *(2,), **{'d':4}) (1, 2) {'b': 3, 'd': 4} So, the positional arguments are put together and so are the keyword arguments. Using the original signature, it means both 2 and 3 will be assigned to b, which is ...


3

Unpacking only works when you are inside a function call: >>> def foo(a,b,c): ... pass ... >>> foo(*[1,2,3]) >>> Using it elsewhere will cause an Error: >>> (*[1,2,3]) File "<stdin>", line 1 (*[1,2,3]) ^ SyntaxError: invalid syntax In Python 2.7, print is not a function, it is a statement. As far ...


3

You're passing only one argument to President(), which is the list ['FDR', False, 4, 1933] If you want to pass the items in that list as separate arguments, you do it like this: apresident = President(*testdata) # note the * character As Colonel Panic points out, in your example the use of argument-unpacking is a little pointless - presumably your ...


3

Use the * operator. So add(*x) would do what you want. See this other SO question for more information.


3

You can do this: args = (const_a, const_b, const_c) ExternalLibrary.open(*args) The * syntax unpacks an iterable (tuple, list, etc.) into individual arguments in a function call. There is also a ** syntax for unpacking a dictionary into keyword arguments: kwargs = {'foo': 1, 'bar': 2} func(**kwargs) # same as func(foo=1, bar=2) You can also use both ...


3

It's a bad idea in general to use obj.__dict__ because the object dictionary does not contain any descriptors or other "magic" attributes that may exist on the object. It will also include hidden attributes that, by convention, are hidden behind a _ prefix. Thus, the obj.__dict__ technique really only works for completely basic types, and is not future proof ...


3

You don't need to use the asterisk to accept a list. Simply give the argument a name in the definition, and pass in a list like def takes_list(a_list): for item in a_list: print item


3

You can pass lists just like other types: l = [1,2,3] def stuff(a): for x in a: print a stuff(l) This prints the list l. Keep in mind lists are passed as references not as a deep copy.


3

You can apply a dict as an argument list by the ** notation machineSpecificEnvironment = Environment(**keys)


2

Seems to be related with this (non-)bug (old), but there are even more bug reports and it really seems to be fixed from 2.6.5 on only. That is all I found and I don't have more insight into Python to explain how or why ;)


2

Namedtuple does this for you outright. Here's a talk from PyCon US 2011 [11:35 - 26:00] from collections import namedtuple Add = namedtuple("Add", "a b c d") one = Add(1, 2, 3, 4) def addme(a, b, c, d): print a + b print c + d >>> addme(*one) ... 3 ... 7


2

No, there's no direct support for this in the language. Python and Ruby, as well as Javascript you're mentioning; are all dynamic/scripting languages. Go is way more closer to, for example, C than to any dynamic language. The 'apply' functionality is handy for dynamic languages, but of little use for static languages like C or Go,


2

You should only use *args if you do not know how many arguments will be passed to function. In your case, it looks like you need all of president, alive, terms, firstelected. There is nothing wrong with having a constructor that takes all of those as parameters. *kwargs is used for a few reasons. One is if you have default values that should be used, ...


2

You just want a single asterisk: create_character = player.Create(*generate_player.generate()) You're passing a sequence of arguments, for which you use one asterisk. The double-asterisk syntax is for passing a mapping, for instance to do something like this: player.Create(**{'name': 'Richie', 'age': 21, 'gender': 'male'})


1

The ** syntax requires a dictionary; each key-value pair in the dictionary becomes a keyword argument. Your generate() function, on the other hand, returns a tuple, not a dictionary. You can pass in a tuple as separate arguments with similar syntax, using just one asterisk: create_character = player.Create(*generate_player.generate()) Alternatively, fix ...


1

You're calling President(testdata), when you should be doing President(*testdata) in order to unpack the list as you call the constructor. Right now, you're essentially passing a single argument (the list), hence the IndexError: you're passing a single argument, so args is equal to [testdata] and not testdata. As mentioned in the other answer though, ...


1

Either your function is varargs, in which you can use a slice with the ... notation as Hunter McMillen shows, or your function has a fixed number of arguments and you can unpack them when writing your code. If you really want to do this dynamically on a function of fixed number of arguments, you can use reflection: package main import "fmt" import ...


1

Q1: Instead of giving 'practice' as max string why is max(word1,max(t0)) giving tanice Strings are ordered lexicographically. t > p so tanice is greater than practice Q2: t=max(word1,max(t0)) works but max(word1,nwords) doesn't. Why & Is there a workaround to this? This is because max expects either an iterable, or a variable number of ...


1

You should use print message directly, that's enough (it will print the tuple of extra arguments). Little addition to previous answers: in Python 2.x, print is not a function but a statement, but print(arg1, arg2) is valid... as using print statement on the tuple (arg1, arg2). This is a bit different from print arg1, arg2 as one can see: >>> ...



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