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25

If you want that to mean that you can pass any type to the function, make it a template: template <typename T> int function(T data); There's a proposal for C++17 to allow the syntax you used (as C++14 already does for generic lambdas), but it's not standard yet.


17

Templates are the way you do this with normal functions: template <typename T> int function(T data) { //DOES something } Alternatively, you could use a lambda: auto function = [] (auto data) { /*DOES something*/ };


16

Simply assign the input array to a hash: sub my_sub { my %args = @_; # Work with the %args hash, e.g. print "arg1: ", $args{arg1}; } If you want to provide default values, you can use: sub my_sub { my %args = ( 'arg1' => 'default arg1', 'arg2' => 'default arg2', @_ ); # Work with the (possibly ...


6

Ignoring the perfect forwarding as requested, this should work: template<typename B, typename C> struct forEachNArgsImpl; template<std::size_t... Bs, std::size_t... Cs> struct forEachNArgsImpl< std::index_sequence<Bs...>, std::index_sequence<Cs...> > { template<std::size_t N, typename TF, typename... Ts> ...


6

JavaScript passes arrays and objects to functions by passing a copy of the reference to the array/object, so it is likely to be fine to pass the whole thing. Just know that if you mutate it in the function, those changes will affect your original array/object! If this is browser code and not server (e.g., Node.js) code, you can test with jsperf.com. Just ...


4

Could it be that the inner loop ends with i pointing at 0; then there is i++ in the outer loop; leading to access of elements outside of the array border (and undefined behavior)?


3

Unlike string, char does not have ToUpper() or ToLower() instance methods. It does have static methods with those names, which is why you get a confusing error message. Use char.ToLower(y).


3

You're calling char.ToLower - which is a static method accepting the relevant character as a parameter, and optionally a CultureInfo. So you probably want: y = char.ToUpper(letter); and y = char.ToLower(letter); Note that your loop would be a lot simpler if you used the conditional operator: for(int i = 0; i < array.Length; i++) { char letter ...


3

Does not contain a constructor that takes 0 arguments This happens because your base class Rectangle does not in fact contain such a constructor, but you have not specified some other constructor to call. The parameterless constructor is the default when your class's constructor doesn't specify a base class constructor to call, but since one doesn't ...


3

The C99 and C11 draft standards allow for implementation defined set of parameters to main, these parameters are going to be specific to those systems(non-portable). From section 5.1.2.2.1: [...]or in some other implementation-defined manner[...] The only additional parameters I can find documented are envp and apple, we can find a good description in ...


3

#define EVEN_OR_ZERO(cc) even_or_zero(cc) This may be the perfect answer or a bad joke, depending on why you need a macro, which you haven't told us.


2

The alternative is the wide-character version: int main(int argc, wchar_t* argv[], wchar_t* envp[]) The main function is specified in the language specification as the following, no other function signature is provided besides a get-out clause for implementation-specific entrypoint functions (like Apple's 3rd apple parameter) or Microsoft's WinMain ...


2

Following may help: namespace detail { template<std::size_t...IsN, std::size_t...Is, typename F> void forEachNArgsImpl(std::index_sequence<IsN...>, std::index_sequence<Is...>, F) { } template<std::size_t...IsN, std::size_t...Is, typename F, typename... Ts> void forEachNArgsImpl(std::index_sequence<IsN...> isn, ...


2

The core of this is call_with_some, that takes a callable and a package of indexes and varargs, and calls the callable with the indexes of the varargs. Some index helpers: template<size_t K, class indexes> struct offset_indexes; template<size_t K, size_t...Is> struct offset_indexes<K, std::index_sequence<Is...>>: ...


2

The statements: NSString *extension = @".png"; NSString *newName = [self uniquePicName:extension]; must be in a method of the class. If the statements are not in a method self does not exist and you get the message: "Use of Undeclared Identifier 'self'".


2

No, it is not possible to pass variables to callback method. Reason is simple as callback methods are called by rails stack and when it will call callback method, it did't know what to pass in callback method.


1

Here's a variation of what was presented at C++Now2014: #include <utility> #include <tuple> #include <cassert> struct type_erasure { }; template<class T> struct wrapper : type_erasure { wrapper(T&& w) : w_(std::forward<T>(w)) { } T&& w_; decltype(auto) get() { return std::forward<T>(w_); } ...


1

Use argparse. import argparse parser = argparse.ArgumentParser() parser.add_argument("-n", "--number", help="Enter a number", type=int) You can then access the arg like this - args = parser.parse_args() num_players = args.number if args.number else 30


1

You are doing things too complicated. Just use an argument of type List<T> or IList<T>. If you don't need the list's index, but need to add or remove elements, you can also type the argument as ICollection<T>. If you only need to enumerate the collection, type it as IEnumerable<T>. This allows you to pass a greater number of types to ...


1

The answer is simple: Don't use a macro, unless there's a good reason for it. This case isn't one of them: int even_or_zero(int i) { if (i % 2) { return 0; } else { return i; } }



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