Tag Info

New answers tagged

5

As argc contains the number of arguments passed to the program increased by 1, the test needs to be if (argc < 3). (argc is the length of the argv array, which includes the program name as argv[0]. A useful mnemonic is that argv[argc] is always NULL.)


2

argc - argument count argv - arg's value Change: if(argc < 2) { To: if(argc < 3) { Read more about command line args here: http://www.cprogramming.com/tutorial/c/lesson14.html


1

your function needs to be passed a char * [] (which is equivalent to a char** in an argument specification). You shouldn't specify the type when calling a function, that should have given you a compiler error (char * is not to be used here!) // this doesnt work (for data) parse_args(char *argv, data, &data_len) must be replaced by parse_args(argv, ...


2

This line data = (unsigned char *)argv[1]; modifies a local copy of main's local data, because all parameters, including pointers, are passed by value. If you would like to modify data inside main, pass it by pointer (i.e. you need a pointer to pointer now): void parse_args(char *argv[ ], unsigned char **data_ptr, int *nprocs) { ... *(data_ptr) = ...


1

In version (1.0) you can use the argv(1) function. $ cat args.sac use StdIO: all; use Array: all; use CommandLine: all; int main() { printf("Test: %s\n", argv(1)); return(0); } $./args hello $ Test: hello


3

The zero byte is the string terminator, so it never gets passed on by the shell when using the backticks. I'm pretty sure the kernel does not pass on any bytes after the first zero, either, because how should it know the actual length of the argument to copy? You can easily verify this by echo `python -c 'print "\x01\x00\x02\x01"'` | hd In your program ...


2

on Windows, your command line is in the PEB (Process Environment Block). You probably should not modify it, but you can find it and act upon it. you can find it using GetCommandLine(): https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/ms683156(v=vs.85).aspx and parse it either yourself, or using CommandLineToArgvW ...


1

You can use prctl to set the name shown by top. #include <sys/prctl.h> void function() { ... prctl(PR_SET_NAME, "new name", 0, 0, 0); ... } Note that this won't change the name shown by ps, or the contents of /proc/<pid>/exe. Also, it only changes the name of the current thread, and must be a maximum of 16 bytes. See man prctl and ...


1

For readlink, Bring Your Own Buffer. You allocate a buffer, pass in a pointer to it, and readlink will store the results there: #include <unistd.h> #include <linux/limits.h> int main() { char buffer[PATH_MAX]; int size = readlink("/proc/self/exe", buffer, sizeof(buffer)); buffer[size] = '\0'; // buffer is now the char* holding the ...


1

&argv[0] gets you a pointer to argv[0]. You can overwrite the characters stored in the array that argv[0] is pointing at, so long as you don't go past the existing null terminator; however it might cause UB to try and modify the pointer argv[0].


1

In some implementations, the argv variables can point directly to the original command line where first delimiter (space) after each argument has been replaced with a null. In such an implementation it is clear that alignement is what it is and cannot be controled !


2

It is not possible. The align attribute tells the compiler how to align structures for which it generates code and data. It also tells the compiler about the actual alignment of extern structures and data generated by other code. The argv arguments are supplied by the C startup code or the OS directly. No assumptions should be made about their alignment ...


6

// Store args in a vector of strings for ease of use (excluding first arg) auto args = std::vector<std::string>{argv+1, argv+argc}; // Iterate through each argument for(auto& arg : args) { // If any of the characters in arg (a string) are alpha if(std::any_of(arg.begin(), arg.end(), std::isalpha)) /*...*/ else /*...*/ } ...


0

Since argv is an array containing C-strings, argv[s] is a C-string, and *argv[s] (which is equal to argv[s][0]) accesses only the first character in that string. If you want to check that there are no letters in the entire char array, you'll have to loop through that array too: for(int s = 1; s < argc; s++) // loops through the array of C-strings { ...


1

Break it down into pieces. argv[1] is the first command-line parameter. (argv[2] is the second, and so on...) It has a length, determined by strlen. Iterate over that length, checking each character: int main(int argc, char* argv[]) { char* Param1 = argv[1]; for(int s = 0; s< strlen(Param1); s++) { if (isalpha(Param1[s])) { ...


0

There are two errors in the random() function return ( rand() % (lims - limi) - lims); In the first place % (lims - limi) will produce a range too short by 1. And after the modulus operation, you should add the lower limit, not subtract the upper one. In your question, the limits were -10000 and 10000 so it made no difference, but if you had called it as, ...


1

The arguments to your application are passed in as an array of strings in argv[]. To convert the first argument to an integer, parse it using atoi(), strtol() or sscanf(): if (argc > 1) { int amount = atoi(argv[1]); for ( count = 1; count < amount; count++) { p = random(-10000,10000); printf(" %d\n",p ); } } The ...


3

This is an OS-level problem (limit on command line length), and is conventionally solved with an OS-level (or, at least, outside-your-Python-process) solution: find . -maxdepth 1 -type f -name '*.txt' -exec ./your-python-program '{}' + ...or... printf '%s\0' *.txt | xargs -0 ./your-python-program Note that this runs your-python-program once per batch ...


1

No. That is a kernel limitation for the length (in bytes) of a command line. Typically, you can determine that limit by doing getconf ARG_MAX which, at least for me, yields 2097152 (bytes), which means about 2MB. I recommend using python to work through a folder yourself, i.e. giving your python program the ability to work with directories instead of ...


1

I think about using glob module. With this module you invoke your program like: python functionName.py "*.txt" then shell will not expand *.txt into file names. You Python program will receive *.txt in argumens list and you can pass it into glob.glob(): for fi in glob.glob(sys.argv[1]): ...


1

Don't do it this way. Pass mask to your python script (e.g. call it as python functionName.py "*.txt") and expand it using glob (https://docs.python.org/2/library/glob.html).


0

I found my problem. When I run the program in linux terminal, I used ./a.out. When I used ./a.out ./ result came out correctly.


2

File redirection is handled by the shell, not by the program. When the shell sees "<" it basically says "when you start this program, map stdin to this file instead of the terminal". So, under the hood, the shell does fork(); followed by closing and opening the file in it's place, then calls execv() or similar to actually execute the program. Similarly, ...


0

I doubt, it's a stream of data, filename is not being streamed to the program Besides, I don't think you should look for the input in argv, you should read stream contents from stdin, e.g. using scanf's


3

. is the concatenation operator. DBI->connect('dbi:Oracle:' . $ARGV[0], 'XXXXXXXXXXX', $ARGV[1]) or even DBI->connect("dbi:Oracle:$ARGV[0]", 'XXXXXXXXXXX', $ARGV[1]) By the way, you shouldn't pass passwords on the command line since they can be seen by other users on the machine.


0

What exactly do you want your code to do? If you want to have $ python ex13.py $ What is your favorite color? <yourColor> .......... $ Your favorite color is <yourColor> Then you need to get rid of the part where you set all those values from argv. argv is a list of the arguments passed to python when you invoke it in the ...


1

int parseLayerFile(WRAPPER_t * w, char*filename[]) expects two parameters. You are calling it with only one parameter: parseLayerFile(argv[i]); As none of the argument suit your needs, fix the function as follows: int parseLayerFile(const char * filename) { unsigned char * buffer; size_t size = get_fileContent(filename, &buffer); }



Top 50 recent answers are included