Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

103

Select the Pods project Change Build Active Architecture Only from Yes to No. That worked for me. Note: CocoaPods Troubleshooting Guide recommends matching the Debug setting in your Xcode project, rather than changing the Pod's Build Active Architecture Only. As long as they match it seems to fix the problem.


45

I think the safest way is to box them into NSNumber instances. NSLog(@"Number is %@", @(number)); // use the highest level of abstraction This boxing doesn't usually have to create a new object thanks to tagged pointer magic. If you really don't want to use NSNumber, you can cast primitive types manually, as others suggested: NSLog(@"Number is %ld", ...


21

You can also use %zd (NSInteger) and %tu (NSUInteger) when logging to the console. NSInteger integer = 1; NSLog(@"first number: %zd", integer); NSUInteger uinteger = 1; NSLog(@"second number: %tu", uinteger); Also to be found here.


17

As Tony wrote, it's important to have in both lines those settings. Since my (and obviously your) project was created yet before arm64 was added to standard, it is not reflected in "Valid Architectures" even if it is shown as Standard. What I did: I went to Project (vs. Target) configuration Typed "arm64" in the Valid Architectures (it's automatically ...


16

Please, read again the warning :) Use "Standard architectures" like this: Architecture: "Standard architectures" arm7, arm64 Valid Architectures: "arm64" , armv7... Build Active Architecture Only - NO (specially... if your connected device is not arm64 compatible) like this:


16

First, try updating cocoapods in your terminal: gem update cocoapods If it doesn't work after that, go into your workspace, click on the Pod project, select all Pod targets and set Architectures to (armv7 armv7s arm64). Still nothing? Try switching it all back to (armv7 armv7s).


14

Xcode 5.1 changed the standard project settings. Among others it now includes the arm64 architecture for the project - but a lot of 3rd party projects don't support that yet, so I recommend to remove it from the architectures settings again (leaving you with armv7 and armv7s). Keep it in the valid architectures setting, though - this specifies on which ...


13

Got to Build Settings -> Architectures You probably have Standard Architectures set, right? As of Xcode 5.1 Standard Architectures includes arm64, which you are not ready to support. Select Other.. doubleclick $(ARCHS_STANDARD) and change it to $(ARCHS_STANDARD_32_BIT) Note: This is a temporary fix. You are probably using some static library that didn't ...


12

Agreed with @David H that NSInvocation is broken in this case, or possibly the NSString doubleValue method. I was able to force it to work, however. It appears to me that NSInvocation is broken due to a calling-convention issue / mismatch. Typically, parameters and return values for objective-c methods are passed in registers. (objc_msgSend knows how to ...


12

After confirming the correct architectures, make sure your device is NOT connected to your computer when ARCHIVING the final build to submit to the App Store. The reason this warning appears is because the DEVICE you have connected is probably not arm64 compatible.


9

Xcode 5.1 forces arm64 as standard architecture. However, the Xcode release notes also mentions, Projects not able to support 64-bit need to specifically set the architectures build setting to not include 64-bit. Apple does not explicitly say it is mandatory to have arm64 support. I have not found any official doc saying Apple has made it mandatory to ...


8

I have use below scripts for making FFmpeg build for arm64 https://github.com/kewlbear/FFmpeg-iOS-build-script https://github.com/bbcallen/ijkplayer/blob/fc70895c64cbbd20f32f1d81d2d48609ed13f597/ios/tools/do-compile-ffmpeg.sh#L7 You have to add libbz2.dylib and libiconv.dylib framework in your xCode project.


7

You can build it from source with this build script: https://github.com/x2on/OpenSSL-for-iPhone


7

On 64-bit architectures (like arm64), CGFloat is defined as double and therefore a 8-byte floating point number, whereas float is a 4-byte floating point number. Therefore you cannot pass a float[] array to a function expecting a CGFloat[] array. Changing your array to CGFloat lengths[] = {4,5}; should solve the problem.


6

Okay so I found the solution. Google guide iOS developers on how to implement AdMob SDK, however they are missing some info. They tell you it's mandatory to add these Frameworks: - AudioToolbox.Framework - MessageUI.Framework - SystemConfiguration.Framework - CoreGraphics.Framework To solve the error I added this ones also: ...


6

You would do the following #if __LP64__ \\You're running on 64 bit #else \\You're running on 32 bit #endif


6

According to apple's release note, see the following note point. Note: Be aware of the following architectures issues when opening your existing projects in Xcode 5.1: When building for all architectures, remove any explicit architectures setting and use the default Standard Architectures setting. For projects that were previously opted-in using ...


6

if not include 64 bit please include 64 bit


5

After lots of stuff i got solution. some of xcode dont know there is automatic appear Standard architectures (including 64-bit) (armv7,armv7s,arm64) but in my case there is not option into my Static Library Project. so i am going to add this Manually like:- and select this Option:- After this i re-Build My static Library and used in to in my project ...


5

Double check to make sure that the GAD library has been added in xcode linked frameworks and libraries. The second thing to look at is the Storekit framework. These classes that are giving you an error are from the storekit. Check to ensure that it's added to your project


5

OSAtomicAdd32Barrier() exists for people that are using OSAtomicAdd() for something beyond just atomic increment. Specifically, they are implementing their own multi-processing synchronization primitives based on OSAtomicAdd(). For example, creating their own mutex library. OSAtomicAdd32Barrier() uses heavy barrier instructions to enforce memory ordering ...


5

Answer lies here: https://devforums.apple.com/message/922989#922989 I found the reason. In a viewController, which was not yet allocated, but included in the app, there was following implemented (in the .m-file above implementation viewController): @implementation UIImageView (UIScrollView) - (void)setAlpha:(float)alpha { ..........(no difference if here ...


4

“v0”: scanon$ cat bar.c int foo(void) { __asm__("":::"q0"); return 0; } scanon$ xcrun -sdk iphoneos clang bar.c -arch arm64 -c bar.c:2:16: error: unknown register name 'q0' in asm __asm__("":::"q0"); ^ 1 error generated. scanon$ cat foo.c int foo(void) { __asm__("":::"v0"); return 0; } scanon$ xcrun -sdk iphoneos clang foo.c -arch ...


4

It's likely that your ARM64 device has a locale setting that is causing the comma to be treated as a decimal or simply as non-numeric text. In general, you're better off using NSNumberFormatter. Apple docs on NSNumberFormatter


4

Oh, the mind-bending horror of weak memory ordering... The first snippet is your basic atomic read-modify-write - if someone else touches whatever address x1 points to, the store-exclusive will fail and it will try again until it succeeds. So far so good. However, this only applies to the address (or more rightly region) covered by the exclusive monitor, so ...


4

Finally, I can reproduce the crash right now. Simply edit Build Scheme and change "Run YOURAPPNAME.app" from Debug to Release. And right after I can reproduce this bug, I know how to fix it. Since my selector function type is void(does not return anything), I should not just copy what the question does (using "id"). By changing: id (*response)(id, SEL, ...


4

NSScanner only supports a few basic types, so you're going to need to have that #if directive somewhere. That said, if you're using this often you could subclass NSScanner or use a category to make the code more elegant. I think the category-based code would look something like: NSScanner+MyAdditions.h: #import "NSScanner.h" @interface NSScanner ...


4

It is primarily highlighting the contrast with the A32 (ARM) LDRD/STRD instructions*, which can only load a consecutive pair of registers, the lowest of which must be even-numbered, i.e.: LDRD r0, r1, [sp] @ OK LDRD r0, r7, [sp] @ <Rt> and <Rt2> are non-contiguous: invalid LDRD r3, r4, [sp] @ Contiguous but <Rt> odd-numbered: invalid ...


4

With difficulty. You can only switch between AArch32 state and AArch64 state at an exception boundary, so whilst e.g. 64-bit kernel/32-bit userspace is possible, it's impossible to use both in a single process. Since it's an entirely different instruction set/register layout/exception model/etc. there's no 32/64-bit interworking in the style of ARM/Thumb ...


4

There no official way to get this information, but you can compare pointer's size to get this it during the runtime: if (sizeof(void*) == 4) { NSLog(@"32-bit app"); } else if (sizeof(void*) == 8) { NSLog(@"64-bit app"); }



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible