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6

Iterators aren't intended to be faster, they're intended to be as fast, which they are, and significantly more generic. array[i] is only valid for an array- not a linked list.


6

The easiest correct solution is to use iterator_to_array to feed implode, e.g. $traversable = /* your iterator, ArrayObject or any other type of Traversable */ echo implode(",", iterator_to_array($traversable)); This will work as expected with anything that can be iterated with foreach.


6

Array is a native php type. You can create one using the php language construct array(), or as of php 5.4 onwards [] ArrayObject is an object that work exactly like arrays. These can be created using new keyword ArrayIterator is like ArrayObject but it can iterate on itself. Also created using new Comparing Array vs (ArrayObject/ArrayIterator) They ...


5

Iterators allow container independent algorithms to be developed. This way something like std::sort doesn't really have to care whether it is a vector or your_datastructure_here as long as it meets the appropriate iterator requirements. Consider finding the maximum in a list, vector, or bare array. int A[...]; // ...some array std::list<int> ...


5

Because you never move in you iterator (with ArrayIterator::next()). while ($it->valid()) { ... $it->next(); }


4

A few points : i has the value of end of loop by the time the callback is called. to iterate over an array using jQuery, use $.each(array,, not $(array).each( the function doesn't have to be defined in the loop each gives the index as second argument of the callback and as first argument the value. So it seems that what you want is in fact this : var ...


3

you should use $it->next(); else you will cicle over the same key eternally


3

In the simple case of "random access" through a vector? No. In fact, your vector iterator is probably defined in terms of array access, and will be precisely as quick. What you gain is the ability to use them in generic programming. You may not always be using a vector, and not all containers support random access. Use iterators not only for consistency, ...


3

It seems that values in plain arrays aren't modifiable because they can't be passed by reference to the constructor of ArrayIterator (RecursiveArrayIterator inherits its offset*() methods from this class, see SPL Reference). So all calls to offsetSet() work on a copy of the array. I guess they chose to avoid call-by-reference because it doesn't make much ...


3

It is possible. Have your object implement the Iterator interface, and then you will be able to foreach over it natively. (Note, you need to correctly implement the methods to advance and rewind your array) More info: The Iterator interface. Read the examples and user comments. Iterators - Programming with Anthony @ YouTube - Who explains it very well.


3

By overloading the index operator. http://dlang.org/operatoroverloading.html#array For example: struct A { int opIndex(size_t i1, size_t i2, size_t i3); } void test() { A a; int i; i = a[5,6,7]; // same as i = a.opIndex(5,6,7); }


2

ArrayObject and array are somewhat alike. Merely a collection of objects (or native types). They have some different methods that you can call, but it mostly boils down to the same thing. However, an Iterator is something else completely. The iterator design pattern is a way to secure your array (making it only readable). Lets take the next example: You ...


2

you're iterating over current element, you need to do $it->next(); to point/go to the next element


2

There is a documented bug which sounds very "close" to the bug you've found! In order to work-around it, you can do as follows: $array = array('koala', 'kangaroo', 'wombat', 'wallaby', 'emu', 'kiwi', 'kookaburra', 'platypus'); $object = new ArrayIterator($array); for ( $object->rewind(); $object->valid(); $object->next() ) { ...


2

Notice that the ArrayIterator class implements ArrayAccess. To modify the array, simply treat $this as an array: $this['k'] = 'v'; Unfortunately, functions such as in_array don't work on array-like objects; you need an actual array. getArrayCopy() will work, but I would just use (array) $this. EDIT: As salathe notes in a comment, getArrayCopy() is ...


2

Not using the Iterator classes (which seem to be copying data on the RecursiveArrayIterator::beginChildren() instead of passing by reference.) You can use the following to achieve what you want function drop_200(&$v) { if($v < 200) { $v = 0; } } $aNestedArray = array(); $aNestedArray[101] = range(100, 1000, 100); $aNestedArray[201] = range(300, 25, ...


2

It depends on which database you're using and your database configuration. For MySQL you need to make sure you use buffered queries. In PDO you set it like this: $myPdo->setAttribute(PDO::MYSQL_ATTR_USE_BUFFERED_QUERY, true); This means that all the data will be sent to the client (not the same as fetching it all in PHP). The other (probably worse) ...


1

Looks like getInnerIterator creates a copy of the sub-iterator. Maybe there is a different method? (stay tuned..) Update: after hacking at it for a while, and pulling in 3 other engineers, it doesn't look like PHP gives you a way to alter the values of the subIterator. You can always use the old stand by: <?php // Easy to read, if you don't mind ...


1

By default, the RecursiveIteratorIterator will only list the leaves. Try $rit = new RecursiveIteratorIterator( new RecursiveArrayIterator($hierarchy), RecursiveIteratorIterator::SELF_FIRST); to get the containing elements as well.


1

They generalize to other collections where array[i] is much slower (i. e. lists) or even impossible (recordsets). Also, STL algorithms use them. The STL algorithms were designed to work with any iterable collection - why exclude vectors? The existence of two iterators - one const and the other not - is motivated by the way const references work in C++. If ...


1

May be you will find your answer here: The ArrayIterator class This iterator allows to unset and modify values and keys while iterating over Arrays and Objects. When you want to iterate over the same array multiple times you need to instantiate ArrayObject and let it create ArrayIterator instances that refer to it either by using foreach or ...


1

According to the SPL source code, ArrayObject doesn't implement Traversable directly: class ArrayObject implements IteratorAggregate, ArrayAccess, Countable { ... } This matches the SPL documentation. I believe DaveRandom is correct.


1

The main issue is not using $it->next(); in your but that still many not give you the desired output because If you run print $it->current(); it would only return Array since you can not output array information with print. You should be using RecursiveArrayIterator and RecursiveIteratorIterator since you are dealing with multidimensional array To ...


1

That is so poor design, no but a total anti js pattern even beyond... Why would you define the same function over and over again!!! $(imgNumArray).each(function (indexArraykey) { (function (i) { timerx[i] = setTimeout(internalCallback(i, indexArraykey), i * 500000); })(i++); }); function internalCallback(i, indexArraykey) { val = ...


1

I am not javascript expert, but looks like here internalCallback is getting called instead of being passed as function to setTimeout. Try this: var i = 1; var indexArray = [3,6,9]; var timerx = new Array(); $( indexArray ).each(function( indexArraykey ) { function internalCallback ( i, indexArraykey ) { return function () { val = ...


1

Instead try, if (!isset($album['cover_photo'])) continue; Or better check the variable isset before assigning it. $album_cover = (isset($album['cover_photo'])) ? $album['cover_photo'] : '';


1

Newer versions of php allow you to chain expressions like that. Examples: php 5.3: http://codepad.viper-7.com/4zgSxW php 5.4: http://codepad.viper-7.com/oGtKqc Both use the same code: <?php $array = array(range(1,5), range(6,10), range(11, 15)); if(array_shift($array)[0] == 1){ echo "hello"; } 5.3 shows a parse error. 5.4 shows the expected ...


1

As stated in the comments in the PHP manual the flag causes the properties, instead of the array values to be visible in var_dump. Credits for this go to the commenter in the PHP manual: <?php $a = new ArrayObject(array(), ArrayObject::STD_PROP_LIST); $a['arr'] = 'array data'; ...


1

Maybe I don't understand your situation fully but I don't see the need for array_merge_recursive() Suppose you have data like this: <?php $carsResponse1 = array( array( 'make' => 'Ford', 'price' => 3500 ), array( 'make' => 'GM', 'price' => 4900 ) ); $carsResponse2 = array( array( ...



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