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8

You can use var arr = "10,9,8,7,6,5,4,3,2,1".split(',').map(Number);


6

Well, if you were to enumerate the indices in order for that fill pattern, you would get 0,0 1,0 0,1 2,0 1,1 0,2 2,1 1,2 2,2 So, you need to iterate through the total of the two indices. That is, the additive total. As you can see, 0,0 totals 0, 1,0 and 0,1 total 1, and so on. Giving us something like this: 0 1 2 1 2 3 2 3 4 To iterate in this diagonal ...


5

You are replacing whatever value $data[$CSVKey] is each time you assign a new array. You should just continue using your bracket notation to assign your values: $data[$CSVKey]['key1'] = $key1value; $data[$CSVKey]['key2'] = $key2value; Or you could use array_merge() if you wanted to add more than one element to the array in one call: $data[$CSVKey] = ...


4

Try using Array#values_at to generate an array to uniq by. sports.uniq{ |s| s.values_at(:sport, :type) }


4

You could use unnamed structs to make a hybrid struct where its member could be treated as an array: struct Foo { union { struct { int x; int y; int z; }; struct { int array[3]; }; }; }; LIVE DEMO Note however, that unnamed struct comes from C11 and its not a standard C++ feature. It is supported as an ...


4

Be careful - you're messing with Object here. Regardless of the actual objects you place into that array, they will all be using Object#equals for its comparison. The reason for that lies in the documentation of Arrays#deepEquals. Two possibly null elements e1 and e2 are deeply equal if any of the following conditions hold: e1 and e2 are both ...


4

The "also" in your first quote refers to an earlier sentence: In addition to declarations in which an incomplete object type is allowed, an array bound may be omitted in some cases in the declaration of a function parameter (8.3.5). An array bound may also be omitted when the declarator is followed by an initializer The text doesn't say so explicitly, ...


4

if a[i] is equivalent to *(a+i). What is the equivalent of a[j][i]? a[j][i] is similar to *(*(a+ j) + i) Now If you want to know how it is? Then let see You already know that a[j]=*(a+j) -------------------------> res 1 Now a[j][i] = *(a[j]+i); --------------------------> res2 After that replace the res1 in res2. ...


4

Your first trial works as intended: sides['red'][0]; This returns 0 as the first value (the 0 index) in your slides['red'] array is equal to 0: 'red': [0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0], ... ^ You could also use: slides.red[0];


3

You're appending the file objects themselves to data, not their contents: fo = open(fileName,"rb"); data.append(fo); So, when you try to print data[1][1], data[1] is a file object (a closed file object, to boot, but it would be just as broken if still open), so data[1][1] tries to treat that file object as if it were a sequence, and file objects aren't ...


3

By casting the $output variable to array, you make a copy of it. The & still works, but it refers to the copy. After the loop, the copy is forgotten/garbage collected, and the original $output was never changed. You can do the following instead, this will convert $output to an array prior to the loop: settype($output, 'array'); ...


3

The longest journey, says the proverb, starts with a single step. In this case, there are three possible first steps in the journey to the end: a hop of 1, 2 or 3 spots. In each case, the journey will continue from a closer point, either 1, 2 or 3 steps closer to the end. So if we know the number of possible paths from the closer points, we can simply add ...


3

$keystr = 'plant,fruit,exotic'; $value='kiwi'; $arr = array(); $current = &$arr; $keys = explode(',', $keystr); foreach($keys as $key) { $current[$key] = array(); $current = &$current[$key]; } $current = $value; unset($current); var_dump($arr); See http://ideone.com/YiMIRb for a demonstration


3

It's not possible with just Array.map, you have to filter as well. var myMap = arr.map(function(e) { return e.id; }).filter(function(x) { return typeof x !== 'undefined'; }); As the ID's are always strings, you can do it like this as well var myMap = arr.map(function(e) { return 'id' in e ? e.id : false; }).filter(Boolean); FIDDLE


3

You want to achive something like this: 1 2 4 7 3 5 8 B 6 9 C E A D F G In the grid of size NxN, for every point (x,y) in the grid, you can determine the value like this (still needs some corrections for offset at 0, see final formula): if you are on the upper left half, calculate the area of the triangle that is above and left of you and add your ...


3

Diagonal of an M by N Matrix, with Robust Array Formatting Given that a lot of these answers have already covered the basic N by N arrays, and some are pretty efficient, I went ahead and made a more robust version that handles M by N arrays, along with a nice formatted printer, for your own enjoyment/masochistic viewing. The efficiency of this method is ...


3

In cases like this just follow the stacktrace! I am guessing from it that the null pointer is thrown here: if(r1.rec.intersects(r2.rec) && r1.isAlive==true && r2.isAlive==true) To be exact it's thrown here r1.rec.intersects(r2.rec) (which assumes that r1.rec and r2.rec aren't null). If you check the code for Rectangle#intersects(Rectangle ...


3

Like many other things in C++, "because C does it that way". (And many things in C are the way they are because B or BCPL did it that way.) In C++ as in C void foo(int p[10]); is equivalent to void foo(int p[]); which is equivalent to void foo(int *p); That is, the parameter looks like an array, but is actually a pointer. An array argument to this ...


3

Generally loops may be used for making any action you want. You can for example concatenate string with other string depending or array element: $array=array('v1','v2','v3'); foreach ($array as $value) { if ($value == 'v1') { echo $value.' something'; } else { echo $value.' something2'; } } and if you have numbers in your array you can ...


3

Never use numerically named variables like $phone1, $phone2 etc. Whenever you do that, what you really want is one array called $phones: $phones = [ ['name' => ..., 'merk' => ..., ...], ['name' => ..., 'merk' => ..., ...], ... ]; You then loop through it like this: foreach ($phones as $phone) { echo $phone['name']; echo ...


3

You have an array of arrays... Try this: $error_c = implode(',', $matches[0]);


3

Sandwich[] sandwiches = new Sandwich[5]; creates an array of 5 null references. You need to initialise each element yourself; in your loop write sandwiches[i] = new Sandwich(); else you'll get NullPointerExceptions. Once you've done that you can call the setting methods as you currently do. Going forward, you could declare a two argument constructor ...


3

You can use indexOf, and take that modulo "perSlice" var arr = [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, ..n] var perSlice = 4; arr.indexOf(5) % perSlice If you want to know WHICH slice the element ends up in, divide instead of %. Math.floor(arr.indexOf(5) / perSlice) // 1


3

You're pretty close, you're just forgetting to relate a and b to each other: posts.sort(function (a, b) { var arate = (a.likes.length * 100) / a.views.length, brate = (b.likes.length * 100) / b.views.length; return arate - brate; }); That will be in ascending order. If you want descending, change the return to return brate - arate;


3

Try :- $check_msg = implode(", ", $_POST['check']);


2

There is no benefit for changing direction. At the first phase you need to traverse string and count characters. Either direction will do. At second phase you find first item in list with count 1. There is not point trying to keep track of last single character, because it can be invalidated by later characters. Consider "bba": When reading from right to ...


2

Don't do a premature optimization. Your code is ok. You may use qobject_cast<QStandardItemModel*>(combo.model()); to get extended access to combobox data. Also, you can implement your own QAbstractItemModel which will store data as QStringList, and provide access to it.


2

Do you know number of ways for n = 0, n = 1 and n = 2? For any larger value N, number of ways = number of ways for N - 1 + number of ways for N - 2 + number of ways for N - 3 You should not calculate the number of ways for given n more than 1 time. (Remember it in a dp array)


2

The problem is that json_decode doesn't return arrays by default, you have to enable this. See here: Cannot use object of type stdClass as array? Anyway, just add a parameter to the first line and you're all good: $accountData = json_decode(file_get_contents("data.json"), true); $newLoginHistory['time'] = "1411053989"; $newLoginHistory['location'] = ...


2

I went through the relevant sections of both N3337 and N3936, and nothing in either version of the standard prohibits a constexpr function of the sort template<std::size_t N> constexpr std::size_t hash_string ( const char (& s)[N] ) noexcept { return s[0]; } And in fact this compiles in both g++ and clang in C++11 mode. I have absolutely ...



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