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27

Printing a char[] behaves differently than other arrays, since PrintStream (which is the type of the System.out instance) has a specific method for printing char arrays - public void println(char x[]) - while for other arrays the general method for Objects is used - public void println(Object x). println(Object x) prints the String "null" when passing to it ...


27

From the documentation: Warning: In place operations will perform the calculation using the precision decided by the data type of the two operands, but will silently downcast the result (if necessary) so it can fit back into the array. Therefore, for mixed precision calculations, A {op}= B can be different than A = A {op} B. For example, suppose a = ...


26

You can use a .Where method with a lambda that accepts the element index as its second parameter: int[] someArray = { 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18 }; int[] newArray = someArray.Where((e, i) => i < 5 || i > someArray.Length - 6).ToArray(); foreach (var item in newArray) Console.WriteLine(item); Output: 0, 1, ...


24

begin() and end() return iterators. Iterators provide uniform syntax to access different types of containers. At the first glance they might look like an overkill for traversing a simple array, but consider that you could write the same code to traverse a list, or a map. This uniform access to various containers will allow you to write algorithms that work ...


21

Yes, it is possible, with O(n^2) time algorithm: Take element at index 0, then write 0 to the cell indexed by that element. Then use just overwritten element to get next index and write previous index there. Continue until you go back to index 0. This is cycle leader algorithm. Then do the same starting from index 1, 2, ... But before doing any changes ...


17

It should be 1. No, it should be 667, because that's how length is defined for standard arrays in JavaScript, which aren't really arrays at all. Arrays in JavaScript are inherently sparse, meaning they can have holes in them (indexes where no value of any kind is stored). How can I have the good count in the fastest way? The only way is by ...


17

You could try this: > matrix(t(cbind(number1,number2,number3)),ncol=3, byrow=T) # [,1] [,2] [,3] # [1,] "A" "A" "A" # [2,] "1" "1" "1" # [3,] "X" "X" "X" # [4,] "B" "B" "B" # [5,] "2" "2" "2" # [6,] "Y" "Y" "Y" # [7,] "C" "C" "C" # [8,] "3" "3" "3" # [9,] "Z" "Z" "Z"


13

It may be for performance reasons. See this article by Jon Skeet. To summarize, value type arrays are invariant in C#, which means the runtime can avoid doing a compatibility check when storing items in the array. In the article, Mr. Skeet uses a wrapper structure similar to the one you described and shows an improvement in write performance to the array. ...


13

Do a split and then filter by index of the word: text.Split(new char[]{' '}, StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries) .Where((word, index) => index % 6 == 0) .ToArray()


12

Before Java 5, Arrays.asList used to accept an Object[]. When generics and varargs were introduced into the language this was changed to public static <T> List<T> asList(T... arr) In your example, T cannot be int because int is a primitive type. Unfortunately, the signature matches with T equal to int[] instead, which is a reference type. The ...


12

Because C makes no assumption about the host machine, and nothing stops the latter from allocating two arrays in two completely separate address spaces. It's not just about theoretical exotic architectures either. 16-bit compilers for x86 machines provided two kinds of pointers. Near pointers were 16 bits wide and behaved like you'd expect them; however, ...


11

A solution with ArraySegment<> (requires .NET 4.5 (2012) or later): var result = new ArraySegment<int>(someArray, 0, 5) .Concat(new ArraySegment<int>(someArray, someArray.Length - 5, 5)); And a solution with Enumerable.Range: var result = Enumerable.Range(0, 5).Concat(Enumerable.Range(someArray.Length - 5, 5)) .Select(idx => ...


11

From the Java documentation for Arrays.asList: Returns a fixed-size list backed by the specified array. (Changes to the returned list "write through" to the array.) This method acts as bridge between array-based and collection-based APIs, in combination with Collection.toArray(). The returned list is serializable and implements RandomAccess. So when ...


10

By default, the form will be submitted with application/x-www-form-urlencoded content type, so your data will be URI-encoded by these rules. Encoded: myList%5B%5D=John&myList%5B%5D=Peter&myList%5B%5D=Mike&myList%5B%5D=Neo&myList%5B%5D=Stella&myList%5B%5D=Eve Decoded: ...


10

Try to change this line: isset($this->PreparedData[$table]) === false to this: !is_array($this->PreparedData[$table]) I saw this explanation here: It just boils down to PHP's crazy type system. $fruits['response']['errormessage'] is the string 'banana', so you're attempting to access a character in that string by the ['orange'] ...


10

The whole point of standard containers is the ability to change them and use the same syntax. If you had a linked list, the first syntax still works. Also it is equivalent to a pointer. i is an index so myarray[i] is slightly slower than it.


9

a[0] and a[1] are both int arrays (i.e. their type is int[]), so one can be assigned to the other, regardless of the lengths of the current arrays they are referring to. Your code is not very different from the following code : int [] a = {1,2,3}; int [] b = {4,5} a = b; Or from this code : Object a = ... Object b = ... a = b; In both cases (as in ...


9

When you use this construct: for (var name in namesArray) { the value of name will be the index in the array (the property name). If you want the actual value in the array, you have to use that property name/index to get the value: document.write(namesArray[name]); Of course, you really should not iterate arrays that way in the first place because ...


9

Your example array actually gives the same problem as a scalar: >>> a = np.array([1.0,2.0,3.0]) >>> np.sum(a, axis=1) Traceback (most recent call last): File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module> File "/usr/lib/python3.4/site-packages/numpy/core/fromnumeric.py", line 1724, in sum out=out, keepdims=keepdims) File ...


9

That's because you don't have a single array of value, you have an array of references to arrays of values. The byte[][] type is not the same as the byte[,] type. The first is an array of arrays (aka jagged array) while the second is a two dimensional array. You would need to copy each array by itself: for (int i = 0; i < a.Length; i++) { ...


9

You're pushing the same object into the array repeatedly, and just updating the id property on that object as you go. If you want multiple objects in the array, you'll need to create multiple objects: var copyArray = []; while (copyArray.length < 3) { copyArray.push({ id: copyArray.length }); } snippet.log(JSON.stringify(copyArray)); ...


9

You could use .sample: match = players.sample(2); match[0].attack(match[1]); This will randomly pick two players from the array, then you have them fight each other. There is no way the same player will be picked for both. More cleanly: p1, p2 = players.sample(2) p1.attack p2


9

Every .ToList() and .ToArray() creates new objects, allocates memory, copies values. So, try to minimize such operations Use more common types: IEnumerable, ICollection. Because both list and array are suitable for IEnumerable, for example: class Program { static void Main(string[] args) { var array = new string[] { "str1", ...


9

This is perfect case to use foldLeft. It will traverse your collection exactly once, without creating another collection (as groupBy does) and it's more concise comparing to the more generic aggregate. def lteqgt(values: Array[Int], v: Int): (Int, Int, Int) = values.foldLeft((0, 0, 0)) { case ((lt, eq, gt), el) => if (el < v) (lt + 1, eq, ...


8

Why not something like this: def list(*projects) projects.join(', ') end Then you can call it with as many arguments as you please list('a') #=> "a" list('a','b') #=> "a, b" arr = %w(a b c d e f g) list(*arr) #=> "a, b, c, d, e, f, g" list(arr,'h','i') #=> "a, b, c, d, e, f, g, h, i" The splat (*) will automatically convert all ...


8

Suffering from buffering? When I add a sleep 1000 to the end of your program, stream the output to a file, and read the tail of the file, I also observe the last numbers to be printed are 261632 and 1952392. The remaining output is stuck in the output buffer, waiting for some event (the buffer filling up, the filehandle closing, the program exiting, or an ...


8

Why didn't the first code update big value. BigInteger is immutable, you can't change it any more than you can change a String, or any primitive wrapper. e.g. String s = "Hello "; s.concat("World"); // doesn't change anything. s = s.concat("World"); // Updates 's' Can I compare this BigInteger.add() with collection.add() Collections are ...


8

In the first case, you have an array, which is not the same as a pointer. So the sizeof is correctly computed. Whereas int* is a pointer, and an array passed to a function always decays to a pointer (except when passing by reference). Also sizeof(int*)/sizeof(int) is the size of the pointer on your machine divided by the size of the int, so if your system ...


8

How do I tackle this problem in the most elegant way? The best solution is to use native ES6 array method .findIndex (or Lodash/Underscore _.findIndex). var index = yourArr.findIndex(val=>val[0] > 0 || val[1] > 0) This code uses ES6 arrow function and is equivalent to: var index = yourArr.findIndex(function (val) { return val[0] > 0 || ...



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