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33

Your answer is equivalent but more readable and less error-prone because you don't need any "magic numbers" for each array element with the "fear" of accessing an element out of the array definition and therefore creating an IndexOutOfBoundsException.


31

You can use Arrays.stream E.g. Arrays.stream(array); You can also use Stream.of as mentioned by @fge , which looks like public static<T> Stream<T> of(T... values) { return Arrays.stream(values); } But note Stream.of(intArray) will return Stream<int[]> whereas Arrys.stream(intArr) will return IntStream providing you pass an array ...


29

Dan Saks wrote about this in 1995, during the lead up to C++ standardisation: The committees decided that functions such as this, that accept a pointer or reference to an array with unknown bound, complicate declaration matching and overload resolution rules in C++. The committees agreed that, since such functions have little utility and are ...


22

C++ doesn't have C's notion of "compatible type". In C, this is a perfectly valid redeclaration of a variable: extern int (*a)[]; extern int (*a)[3]; In C, this is a perfectly valid redeclaration of the same function: extern void f(); extern void f(int); In C, this is implementation-specific, but typically a valid redeclaration of the same variable: ...


21

Morpholocial erosion can be used here. Morphological erosion sets a pixel at (i, j) to the minimum over all pixels in the neighborhood centered at (i, j). source data Out[39]: array([[0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0], [0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]]) ...


20

Non-template functions are preferred over template ones if both are an equally good match (see [over.match.best]/(1.3), (1.6)). Here the conversion performed is an array-to-pointer conversion, which is an Lvalue Transformation with Exact Match rank (according to table 12 in [over.ics.user]). [over.ics.rank]/3: Standard conversion sequence S1 is a ...


16

In C, assignment copies the contents of a fixed-size object to another fixed-size object. This is well defined and fairly straightforward to implement for scalar types (integers, floating-point, pointers, complex types since C99). Assignment of structs is nearly as simple; larger ones might require a call to memcpy() or equivalent, but it's still ...


16

Only array types converted to pointer to its first element when passed to a function. a is of type pointer to an array of int, i.e, it is of pointer type and therefore no conversion. For the prototype void foo(int a[][10]); compiler interpret it as void foo(int (*a)[10]); that's because a[] is of array type. int a[][10] will never be converted ...


14

Alternative to @sol4me's solution: Stream.of(theArray) Of the difference between this and Arrays.stream(): it does make a difference if your array is of a primitive type. For instance, if you do: Arrays.stream(someArray) where someArray is a long[], it will return a LongStream. Stream.of(), on the other hand, will return a Stream<long[]> with a ...


13

This seems to work for me #include <iostream> template<typename T> std::enable_if_t<std::is_pointer<T>::value> foo(T) { std::cout << "pointer\n"; } template<typename T, std::size_t sz> void foo(T(&)[sz]) { std::cout << "array\n"; } int main() { char const* c; foo(c); foo("hello"); } Bonus ...


12

Both are doing the same thing. First approach is more dynamic. You are telling java compiler that those elements will create an array. Compiler knows in compilation time their length, so it creates an array to fit them all. In your second attepmt, you are first creating an array with length of 6. And then put in every slot one object. When to use them: ...


11

You can try with: List<DeviationRisk> result = results.stream() .map(DeviationRisk::new) .collect(Collectors.toList())


10

Consider convolving with a cross-shaped kernel. import numpy as np from scipy.signal import convolve2d kernel = np.array([[0,1,0], [1,1,1], [0,1,0]]) mask = convolve2d(arr, kernel, boundary='symm', mode='same') arr[mask!=5] = 0 This method works correctly for all inputs: In [143]: D = np.random.random_integers(0,1, (5,5)) In [144]: D2 = D.copy() In ...


10

Yes, there is. Use the non-capturing group construct: (?: ... ). You even should use this by default, unless you need backreferences or capturing.


10

You don't have to go all the way to end: std::string(buffer.begin(), buffer.begin() + numberToExtract) or: std::string(&buffer[0], &buffer[numberToExtract]); or use the constructor that takes a pointer and a length: std::string(&buffer[0], numberToExtract); std::string(buffer.data(), numberToExtract);


9

You've defined accounts as a local variable to the constructor, not a class level member. public class Bank { Account[] accounts; int count; public Bank(String bankName, int num) { accounts = new Account[num]; count = 0; } public boolean addAccount(Account acct) { // Do your work } }


9

You can use a very Matlab-like syntax if you use a dot . for elementwise comparison: julia> a = 2:7 2:7 julia> a .> 4 6-element BitArray{1}: false false false true true true julia> a[a .> 4] 3-element Array{Int32,1}: 5 6 7 Alternatively, you can call filter if you want a more functional predicate approach: julia> filter(x ...


9

You should create a Book class that contains the 3 properties, and your getter would return a Book instance. Instead of String name1 = "The brief history of time"; String isbn1 = "111"; String[] authName1 = {"S. Hawking", " Hawking's friend"}; You'll have Book book1 = new Book ("The brief history of time", "111", {"S. Hawking", " Hawking's friend"}); ...


9

In this line: for(i = 0; i < sizeof(buffer); ++i) sizeof(buffer) is the size of array in bytes, if you want the number of elements use i < (sizeof(buffer) / sizeof(buffer[0]))


9

This is much better: for (int i = 0; i < list.length; i++) If you change your mind, and decide that the list needs to be of length 150 instead, then the rest of your code will still work. The other option requires you to change all of your for loops if you change the length of the array at all. There aren't really any other differences. EDIT: As ...


9

You are checking if i is smaller than 18 in the second for loop char[,] matrix = new char[80, 18]; for (int i = 0; i < 80; i++) for (int j = 0; i < 18; j++) //<-- Right there. matrix[i, j] = '1'; Change to: char[,] matrix = new char[80, 18]; for (int i = 0; i < 80; i++) for (int j = 0; j < 18; j++) //<-- Right there. ...


9

You are assigning with =, but the comparison operator needed here is ==. But, authenticated is already a boolean, so just use: if(authenticated){


8

Use a regex (see Pattern and matcher): Pattern p = Pattern.compile("\\d+"); Matcher m = p.matcher(<your string here>); while (m.find()) { //m.group() contains the digits you want } you can easily build ArrayList that contains each matched group you find. Or, as other suggested, you can split on non-digits characters (\D): "blabla 123 blabla ...


8

You need to force it to use an associative array: $arr = json_decode($json_string, true); Or modify your code to use object notation for the objects: foreach ($arr AS $row){ $out .= '<tr><td>'.$row->pid.'</td><td>'.$row->qty.'</td><td>'.$row->sn.'</td></tr>'; } Personally I prefer forcing it ...


8

bool allUnique = array.Distinct().Count() == array.Count(); // or array.Length or var uniqueNumbers = new HashSet<int>(array); bool allUnique = uniqueNumbers.Count == array.Count();


8

You are looking for an ArrayList. Insertion order is preserved, lookup time is constant, resizing is dynamic and managed behind the scenes. And a simple example: List<Integer> list = new ArrayList<>(); list.add(5); list.add(10); list.add(15); //so on list.get(0); //returns 5 in constant time list.get(1); //returns 10 in constant time And so ...


8

This here is a big problem: A = (int *)alloca(sizeof(int) * n); The alloca function allocates on the stack, and it will be lost when the function returns which gives you a stray pointer and undefined behavior when you dereference this pointer. If you're programming C++ then use new, if you program C then use malloc.


8

Because if the CAPACITY is used somewhere else, and in the future you decide that the CAPACITY should be 4, you don't need to change it everywhere. improves readability of the code easier to maintain Compare: for(int i=0;i<2;i++) to for(int i=0;i<CAPACITY;i++) Avoid magic numbers in the code when you can. Many Java classes uses constants, ...


8

qw() separates words by whitespace, not by comma. So, your code is equivalent to my @typedefs = ( 'laa,faa,baa' ); warnings should have told you: Possible attempt to separate words with commas


8

$values = array( 'Marketing' => 'fa-paint-brush', 'Client Delivery' => 'fa-headphones', ... ); echo '<i class="fa ' . $values[$department]. ' fw fa-lg"></i> ';



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