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15

Short answer: Just use quicklisp. Long answer: if you want to understand, how the package, or - more precisely - ASDF system, is laid out, that's a good idea. Actually, there's nothing hard about that. Every ASDF system should have a system definition file with .asd extension. This file names other file of the system with their paths relative to the .asd ...


8

If you use Quicklisp you can use the dedicated directory ~/quicklisp/local-projects/ which is scanned before the others directories. To use it, just put your project or a symbolic link. (quickproject:make-project "~/quicklisp/local-projects/my-new-website/" :depends-on '(restas parenscrit cl-who)) (quickproject:make-project "~/src/lisp/my-cool-gui/" ...


8

Don't put .asd files in ~/quicklisp/quicklisp/. Use ~/quicklisp/local-projects/ instead. The syntax for your start defun is wrong. It needs a lambda list. Common Lisp is often used by starting the environment, loading the application, and then interactively calling functions defined by your application. The load process compiles the source code to machine ...


7

It's pretty easy with Quicklisp. To install Quicklisp: Download http://beta.quicklisp.org/quicklisp.lisp sbcl --load quicklisp.lisp (quicklisp-quickstart:install) (ql:add-to-init-file) Then you can install and load CFFI like so: (ql:quickload "cffi") I wrote a bit about how I manage small projects and their required libraries at Making a small Lisp ...


6

The first problem in your code is that you use apostrophe (’) instead of tick ('). That's why you get undefined variable error, as ’button is read as variable name (it's not quoted). Now regarding packages and systems. A package is defined with defpackage and it is a collection of symbols, which are used after the in-package form inside a file (or in ...


6

Here is the code: (defun system-version (system-designator) (let ((system (asdf:find-system system-designator nil))) (when (and system (slot-boundp system 'asdf:version)) (asdf:component-version system)))) it works like this: CL-USER> (system-version :cffi) "0.10.7.1" CL-USER> (system-version :foo) NIL


6

A system is a collection of files and sub-systems. One can compile or load such a system. There are also other operations possible. It keeps track of dependencies and tries to do a minimal amount of work. If you are using SBCL and CLISP, then ASDF is the tool to choose. See http://www.cliki.net/asdf ASDF provides, amongst other things, a DEFSYSTEM macro to ...


5

In this code, there's something interesting going on: ;; test.lisp (asdf:load-system :helloworld) (defun main() (helloworld:start)) You can't compile it as a whole because, as you've noted trying to read the symbol hellowworld:start is a problem, because there's no helloworld package yet. To read the symbol, you at least need to have the package ...


5

(slot-value (asdf:find-system 'my-system) 'asdf:version)


5

You have to import the symbols into the package you want it to work in. The generic "user" package is cl-user, and a "virgin" image will put you there. In order to import the (exported) symbols from another package, issue (use-package :another-package). Example on the REPL: (asdf:load-system :ltk) (use-package :ltk) Sometimes one wants to use symbols ...


4

Generally these system tools should allow that. All you need is the system description and the FASL files. The system tool should then use the FASL files for loading. One only needs to make sure that it does not have a hard dependence on some source file. This way software has delivered in the Lisp world for decades (> 30 years). There is nothing wrong with ...


4

I currently maintain ASDF. I don't know that ASDF allows that. I wasn't designed for it. That said, I have never tried and can't swear that it won't, or that a simple hack won't let you do it. I'll welcome such a hack into ASDF and/or an extension. At worst, if ASDF won't otherwise let you do it, a "simple" hack would be to create files containing ...


4

As asdf:*central-registry* is not just one path, it is list of pathnames. You can simply do: (push "/path-to-your-project/" asdf:*central-registry*). If you use SBCL, you can add this line to ~/.sbclrc.


4

For the directory part, I recommend using relative pathnames. You could do it several ways. 1- Thou shalt not use an absolute pathname. Use relative pathname like that, possibly via a variable: (subpathname (current-file-pathname) #p"e????.lisp") 2- I'm not sure how portable ? is as a wildcard character — if you can live with it, * is much more portable. ...


4

Yes, with compile-bundle-op (ASDF 3.1): http://common-lisp.net/project/asdf/asdf/Predefined-operations-of-ASDF.html edit: Actually, monolithic-compile-bundle-op seemes to be asked for (as shown in other answers).


4

:depends-on ((:version #:hunchentoot "1.2.18") #:cl-who) Note, that in current ASDF (version 3.1) that will be treated as version 1.2.18+ .


4

Packages, symbols, exporting, using, etc. are a feature of Common Lisp, and not ASDF specific. CL-USER 1 > (defpackage "FOO" (:use "CL") (:export "BAZ")) #<The FOO package, 0/16 internal, 1/16 external> CL-USER 2 > (in-package "FOO") #<The FOO package, 0/16 internal, 1/16 external> FOO 3 > (defun baz () 'FOO) BAZ FOO 4 > ...


4

As explained in the ECL mailing list, setting c::*delete-files* to NIL will prevent the compiler from deleting the intermediate C files. They have extensions *.c, *.eclh (header) and *.data (text definitions of objects), but their names are massaged by ASDF (they get some ASDF- prefix IIRC) and they are not created where the lisp sources live, but rather at ...


3

If Quicklisp is installed you can use the built-in feature Quickproject. (ql:quickload "quickproject") (quickproject:make-project "~/src/lisp/swatchblade/" :depends-on '(vecto hunchentoot)) This creates 4 files: package.lisp swatchblade.lisp swatchblade.asd README.txt package.lisp defines package namespaces: (defpackage ...


3

To my knowledge there is no direct way to do that in ASDF apart from reader conditionals. You could use XCVB instead, or write a defsystem* macro that adds new syntax, or (maybe) hook into the existing defsystem as madeira does. Without knowing your motivation, I wonder why the simple solution of #-ecl is being avoided. Do you wish to store metadata that ...


3

Add the gem "adsf" to your Gemfile, and run bundle command. And, then run nanoc view. Should work.


3

A package in Common Lisp is not like a package in most other senses. It's not an archive of list files, but more like what most other languages would call a module or namespace that lets you select which symbols (names) from your code you want to show to the outside world of code. If you just have one file for your little library, you can just distribute ...


3

When you compile-file this: (defmethod asdf:perform ((op test-op) (system (eql (find-system :foo)))) (asdf:load-system 'foo-tests) (foo-tests:run-tests)) the first step is to read the entire form. Reading includes interning of all symbols found. However, at read time, the form has not executed, so the system foo-tests is not yet loaded. Since that ...


3

I found this clue: "Note the name of a system is specified as a string or a symbol, typically a keyword. If a symbol (including a keyword), its name is taken and lowercased. The name must be a suitable value for the :name initarg to make-pathname in whatever filesystem the system is to be found." http://common-lisp.net/project/asdf/asdf/Using-ASDF.html The ...


3

ASDF and Quicklisp are useful tools, that is an established fact. However, I would like to give an alternative point of view on the concept of "library" as it is discussed on previous answers ASDF is designed to automate the compilation and loading of a set of source files. It is to CL what make is to Unix. It is perfectly valid to write and distribute ...


3

what about (setf *load-verbose* nil) (setf *load-print* nil) (setf *compile-verbose* nil) (setf *compile-print* nil) ? Why are they set, anyway?


3

ASDF provides three built-in component-types, you're using the simple :file component type only in your system definition. Typically for grouping some files together, one would introduce separate modules (which pretty much directly translate to different directories), but modules still require you to specify the (sub-)components and then you're back to where ...


3

Use ASDF or use the Allegro CL defsystem tool. make them two different systems. The test suite system depends on the software system. Use relative pathnames, compute absolute pathnames based on the location of the system definition file or, the 'pro' version, use logical pathnames (which are pathnames in CL which can be remapped according to rules). ...


3

I am using quicklisp which makes a "quicklisp"-folder in your home-folder in which a "local-project" folder can be found. This one contains a txt file in which you can insert the URIs to the .asd files. How to use that utility: make a "project.asd" and "project-test.asd" in the project folder project.asd (manages the includes for the pure project code) ...


3

Here are the exact steps for manual installation under Windows 7: First, download and install SBCL from: http://www.sbcl.org/platform-table.html Then download and untar (tar xzf ...) babel, alexandria, trivial-features, and cffi. Then, start SBCL, load ASDF, and add the paths to these systems to asdf:*central-registry*: C:\Program Files\Steel Bank ...



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