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28

$ echo "a\nb" a\nb $ echo -e "a\nb" a b


14

It supports lists, but not as a separate data structure (ignoring arrays for the moment). The for loop iterates over a list (in the generic sense) of white-space separated values, regardless of how that list is created, whether literally: for i in 1 2 3; do echo $i done or via parameter expansion: listVar="1 2 3" for i in $listVar; do echo $i ...


14

I’m the author of mksh (The MirBSD Korn Shell) and have submitted it for inclusion into Android at roughly the 1.6 time after having had experimental builds of mksh for Android 1.5 already. It took quite a while for this to be accepted, although Android-x86 used it very early. At first we had a configurable switch where the board config would determine ...


9

The shell is splitting the msgs variable so echo get multiple parameters. You need to quote your variable to prevent this to happen: echo "$msgs"


7

My question is why there are two different error messages for same command in two different shell? Because kill is a shell-builtin (at least on bash). This implies that is using bash, saying kill ... would execute the shell builtin and not the binary that might reside in /bin or /usr/bin. $ echo $SHELL /bin/bash $ type kill kill is a shell builtin $ ...


6

You can try this : date -d "2012-09-04T00:11:20.000Z" "+%s" -d str : Set time described by str %s : Timestamp format


6

Pure bash solution: [[ $string =~ toto\.titi\.[0-9]+\.tata\.[0-9]+\.(.*$) ]] && result="${BASH_REMATCH[1]}" echo "$result"


6

You can use braces expansion: $ mv /usr/share/nginx/html/{app.xml,index.html}


6

This should work: echo "xxxxx.yyyyy[2].zzzzz" | awk -F '[][]' '{print $2}' 2 Order of ] before [ inside character class is important here. This shall also work by double escaping [ and ] using alternation regex: echo "xxxxx.yyyyy[2].zzzzz" | awk -F '\\[|\\]' '{print $2}' 2 OR: echo "xxxxx.yyyyy[2].zzzzz" | awk -F '[\\[\\]]' '{print $2}' 2


6

The problem is that leading 0s cause a number to be read as octal. In bash, using $((10#$num)) will force decimal. Thus: num=$(printf "%04d" "$((10#$num + 1))") To work with busybox ash, you'll need to strip the 0s. One way to do this which will work even in busybox ash: while [ "${num:0:1}" = 0 ]; do num=${num:1} done num=$(printf '%04d' "$((num + ...


6

One sed solution: sed -n '/^xxx/! { H }; // p; $ { x; s/^\n//; p }' infile The H appends the content that does not begin with xxx to the hold space, and the opposite match is printed inmediatly // p. At last line $ recover the hold space contents, remove leading newline character and print. It yields: xxx.bbb.21 xxx.eee xxx.hhh.12.ddd aaa.bbb.1.ccc ...


5

An alternate bash solution that uses parameter expansion instead of a regular expression: echo "${string#toto.titi.[0-9].tata.[0-9].}" If the numbers can be multi-digit values (i.e., greater than 9), you would need to use an extended pattern: shopt -s extglob echo "${string#toto.titi.+([0-9]).tata.+([0-9]).}"


5

Just repeating what I guessed in a comment as an answer, now that the questioner has confirmed that this is the problem. The problem here is that ./spawn 1 is outputting to standard error, not standard output. You can redirect the output using 2>&1, so the following should work: ./spawn 1 2>&1 | cut -d '|' -f2


5

Maybe it is easier to work with awk for this: $ awk '$2=="01020300" && $8=="FFFFFF00"' file br-lan 01020300 C0A80101 0003 0 0 3 FFFFFF00 0 0 0 This way you can refer to the 2nd and 8th columns and check its value, without having to worry about the format. In case your file separates ...


5

answer to previous question: awk -F'[.=]' '$4 ~ /^[[:digit:]]+$/ {print $3}' file answer to current question: $ awk -F'[.=]' '/aaa\.bbbb0\.xxxx[0-6]+=toto/ {print $3}' file xxxx0 xxxx1


5

You could use awk: echo "aaaa eeee bbbb ffff cccc" | awk '{for(i=NF;i>0;--i)printf "%s%s",$i,(i>1?OFS:ORS)}' Loop backwards through the fields, printing each one. OFS is the Output Field Separator (a space by default) and ORS is the Output Record Separator (a newline). I'm assuming that you don't want the order of the letters in each word to be ...


4

Two ways; one is to leverage $IFS and use a while loop - this will work for a single line quite happily - as: echo "Part1 Part2 Part3" | while read a b c do echo $a done alternatively, use cut as follows: a=`echo $var | cut -d' ' -f2` echo $a


4

This parameter expansion is a bash extension to POSIX sh. If you review the relevant section of IEEE standard 1003.1, you'll see that it isn't a required feature, so shells which promise only POSIX compliance, such as ash, have no obligation to implement it, and no obligation for their implementations to hew to any particular standard of correctness should ...


4

awk -F[.=] '/=mmmm/{print $3}' input.txt To match the data of your first edit: awk -F[=] '$2 ~ /^[0-9]+(\.[0-9]+)?$/{split($1,a,".");print a[3]}' input.txt This will match floating point numbers too And for second edit awk -F= '/aaa\.bbbb0\.xxxx[0-6]+=toto/{split($1,a,".");print a[3]}' input.txt


4

Maybe this will work for you (process substitution): program < <(sed -n '3,$p' inputfile.txt)


4

Add || return to the end of each call. The value returned by return is the return status of the last command executed when not specified. (Thanks kojiro for the reminder). Or just use set -e if ash supports that (though that has some non-obvious limitations about when it fails to work correctly that make some people suggest that you avoid using it). Run set ...


4

You can process the file twice with awk: $ awk 'FNR==NR {if (/^xxx\./) {print; a[FNR]} next} !(FNR in a)' file file xxx.bbb.21 xxx.eee xxx.hhh.12.ddd aaa.bbb.1.ccc mmm.ppp mmm.qqqq In the first one, we match the lines starting with xxx. and: print them, store its number. In the second reading of the file, we just skip those stored lines.


4

You can for example say: $ grep -Po '(?<=aaa\.bbb\.ccc\.)\d*' file | sort -u 1 2 Step by step Get the digit after aaa\.bbb\.ccc\. (note we escape the dots to match the dot itself, not any character): $ grep -Po '(?<=aaa\.bbb\.ccc\.)\d*' file 1 1 1 2 2 2 sort them and find the unique values: $ grep -Po '(?<=aaa\.bbb\.ccc\.)\d*' file | sort -u ...


4

break takes a parameter which specifies how many levels of surrounding loops to break; in your case I believe it would be 3: http://www.gnu.org/software/bash/manual/bashref.html#Bourne-Shell-Builtins


3

As read in this comment, this should make it: type -t function_name this returns function if it is a function. Test $ type -t f_test $ $ f_test () { echo "hello"; } $ type -t f_test function Note that type provides good informations: $ type -t ls alias $ type -t echo builtin


3

How about using cut? name=$(echo "$variable" | cut -d " " -f 2) UPDATE Apparently, Ash doesn't understand $(...). Hopefully you can do this instead: name=`echo "$variable" | cut -d " " -f 2`


3

For this particular regex you might get away with a parameter expansion hack: if [ "$line" = "Cookie: ${line#Cookie: }" ]; then echo a fi Or a pattern matching notation + case hack: case "$line" in "Cookie: "*) echo a ;; *) ;; esac However those solutions are strictly less powerful than regexes because they have no real ...


3

Using sed: $ sed '/^$/d' foo.txt config 'toto' option option config 'titi' list list config 'tutu' list list If your empty lines contain whitespace you can use $ sed '/^\s*$/d' foo.txt or $ sed '/^[[:space:]]*$/d' foo.txt to filter them out as well. Using awk: $ awk '!/^[[:space:]]*$/' foo.txt ...


3

With sed: sed '/^$/d' file (OR) sed '/^[ ]*$/d' file With tr: tr -s '\n' < file


3

normally (IMHO) myprogram does not know anything about file. The bash starts myprogram and reads the file, and writes the content of file to the stdin of myprogram. So myprogram should not know that his stdin is a file. So, anycommand | myprogram must work. If it doesn't work with ash, maybe you can make a named pipe (mkfifo /tmp/testpipe) Now you can ...



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