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10

If you just return View() it will look for a view with the same name as your action. If you want to specify the view you return you have to put the name of the view as a parameter. public ViewResult Customer() { DetermineCustomerCode(); DetermineIfCustomerIsEligible(); return isCustomerEligible ? View() : View("Index"); } If you want to ...


8

When you don't provide a model to a Partial, MVC thinks you're sending the current one. Give it the model type it's expecting and it should work. As Chris Pratt pointed out, looks like you should use the one in your CombinedModels class @Html.Partial("~/Views/Sort/_Grid.cshtml", Model.PagedStudentModel)


7

You have to chain to the constructor like this: public CalendarController() : this(new DbContext()) { } That's the syntax for chaining to any constructor in the same class - it doesn't have to be from a parameterless one to a parameterized one, although it does have to be to a different one :) Note that this comes before the body of the constructor, so ...


7

You can use something like the following: @Html.DropDownListFor(m => m.NumberOfTickets, Enumerable.Range(1, 10).Select(i => new SelectListItem { Text = i.ToString(), Value = i.ToString() })) All this does is create an enumerable of integers between 1 and 10 and then uses a bit of LINQ to transform it into an IEnumerable<SelectListItem> that ...


7

One way to do it would be to move your interfaces and implementations into separate Visual Studio projects / assemblies and only reference the implementation project in the project(s) that actually needs it - everything else can reference the interface project for your IMenuService - at that point the code can consume the interface, but not actually new up ...


6

You can not rely on the Referrer url being the previous action. Http is inherently stateless. The Referrer property is not reliable and can be quite easily changed. If you are using sessions to track your users, you should use the session state on the server to store the actions visited and read it from the session when needed. Read more about ASP.NET ...


6

Variations on this question are asked here frequently. Basically it boils down to the ModelState object and the fact that its values override values on the actual model for the view. When you post the form, 0 is set in the ModelState object for your ID property. In the post action, you save the entity, which causes its ID property to be updated, but 0 is ...


6

How about an Action Filter. I wrote this quickly and not for efficiency. I have tested it against URL's where I manually placed and leading "/" and worked like a charm. public class NoSlash : ActionFilterAttribute { public override void OnActionExecuting(ActionExecutingContext filterContext) { ...


6

You're selecting the user ID (resulting in a sequence of user IDs) and then calling Distincton that. The result is still a sequence of user IDs... whereas it looks like your page wants a sequence of tblGlobalLogOnLogOffStudentBan. I suspect you want to keep the whole entity, but just make them distinct by user ID. That's most easily done with grouping: var ...


6

I would write a comment but my reputation doesn't allow me to do that. Give a look at Autofixture library. It's an open source library created by Mark Seemann that provides a way to automatically create objects with fake data for testing purposes: https://github.com/AutoFixture/AutoFixture here's a very simplistic example public class Person { public ...


6

The delay you are seeing is purely down to the initial compile of the view on first use. The speed will be down to the server (processor and drive speed, memory, usage etc). You either live with it, or set you project to pre-compile views to avoid the compile at runtime.


5

You need to use @Html.HiddenFor(): @Html.HiddenFor(m => m[i].ProductID) @Html.HiddenFor(m => m[i].ProductName) This will send the data back to the controller. This creates an <input type="hidden"> that will be part of the form POST.


5

It is fine to have one DbContext. If you have many you just need to ensure all the entities you need exist in the that context. For example, if you retrieve a Person from the database and their related Address, then both the Person and Address have to exist in the same DbContext. I've not tried using multiple DbContext instances, but one thing to look out ...


5

This could be due to an IIS configuration issue as outlined in more detail in this answer to a similar question You may need to enable DELETE (and PUT if you need it) in your IIS config something like this: Before: <add name="ExtensionlessUrl-Integrated-4.0" path="*." verb="GET,HEAD,POST,DEBUG" type="System.Web.Handlers.TransferRequestHandler" ...


5

There are many reasons, which are listed by this helpful blog entry. Application pool settings The processModel element of machine.config Memory limit Request limit Timeout


5

The issue is not with the dollar symbol - it's that you're trying to mix server-side and client-side code, which is impossible in the manner you're using. You need to restructure the logic, like this: webcam.save('@Url.Content("~/StudentRSRegistration/Capture?StudentIDD=")' + $("#StudentID").val());


5

I wouldn't try to add markup from the query, if that's what you're saying. Some might disagree, but I'd actually do it in the view. I'd simply loop through the data and, whenever the department_ID changed, I'd output an <hr>.


5

I suggest you change you view model(s) to public class DayVM { public Day Day { get; set; } public bool IsSelected { get; set; } } public class WeekVM { public WeekVM() { Days = new List<DayVM>(); Days.Add(new DayVM() { Day = Day.Sunday }); Days.Add(new DayVM() { Day = Day.Monday }); .. etc } public List<DayVM> Days { ...


5

All you need to do is to return the View that you require. If you want to return a View that has the same name as the action you are in you just use return View(); If you wish to return a View different from the action method you are in then you specify the name of the view like this return View("Index"); public ViewResult Index() { return ...


5

Create a type that holds them both and return that instead: public class PointAndAngle { public Point Point { get; set; } public Angle Angle { get; set; } } var pAndA = new PointAndAngle { Point = p, Angle = a }; return Json(pAndA); You could do it with an anonymous type if you wanted too: return Json(new { Point = p, Angle = a});


5

The notable difference between the Free and Basic/Standard tiers is that Free uses an undisclosed number of shared cores, whereas Basic/Standard has a defined number of CPU cores (1-4 based on how much you pay). Related to this is the fact that Free is a shared instance while Basic/Standard is a private instance. My best guess based on this that since the ...


5

This is a security feature of ASP.Net MVC. By default when it detects HTML in a received value it will prevent execution in case it is part of an XSS attack. To disable this feature on an Action you need to use the ValidateInput attribute and set it to false. Try this: [ValidateInput(false)] public ActionResult Foo(Model myModel) { // your logic ...


4

I got a little confused, because the title mentioned MVC 5. Search for Ajax in the MVC6 github repo doesn't give any relevant results, but you can add the extension yourself. Decompilation from MVC5 project gives pretty straightforward piece of code: /// <summary> /// Determines whether the specified HTTP request is an AJAX request. /// ...


4

This is a common confusion. The posted data goes into the ModelState object, and anything in ModelState overrides anything on your model. This is by design. For example consider the scenario where you're editing an existing entity, but in the edit, the user had an error. If Razor used the model's data, then when the view was returned for the user to fix ...


4

MVC itself is agnostic of the layers you are describing. Many of the templates do put repository/business logic in the same project, but that doesn't mean that you have to keep it there. You also don't have to use those templates - you can build your repositories in other projects (there are even templates that do that for you), and use those in your MVC ...


4

Just use the linq All() method.


4

This is probably a mapping problem. Entity Framework mappings are too complex for me to explain here, but I'll point out where the problem might be. Make sure ApplicationUser has a foreign key property to Person in a way that Entity Framework can understand it. Entity Framework is convention based, so it will look for a PersonId property in your ...


4

Secure cookie A secure cookie can only be transmitted over an encrypted connection (i.e. HTTPS). This makes the cookie less likely to be exposed to cookie theft via eavesdropping. You can read it in Wikipedia there is whole point about it. I will suppose that you are not using HTTPS and because of that the value of the cookie is null. If you ...


4

There are built-in snippets in Visual Studio to help with this: mvcaction4 inserts: public ActionResult Action() { return View(); } And mvcpostaction4 Inserts [HttpPost] public ActionResult Action() { return View(); }


4

If you right click the solution and then select "Multiple Startup Projects" you can tick which projects you want to start after build.



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