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21

The following page worked just great for me after installing the NuGet package: <%@ Page Language="C#" %> <%@ Import Namespace="MvcMiniProfiler" %> <%@ Import Namespace="System.Threading" %> <script type="text/c#" runat="server"> protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e) { MiniProfiler.Start(); ...


18

I finally found the answer to this and it was so simple!! (He says after hours of searching and debugging). I just had to tell explicitly say in which assembly my custom provider resided. I thought I only had to do this when specifying the type when adding the provider. However you need to define when defining your profile in the inherits attribute. Like ...


9

ASP.NET MVC 4 uses the new SimpleMembershipProvider. Here's how you could add custom fields to the autogenerated template and user profile. Create a new ASp.NET MVC 4 application using the Internet Template Navigate to the ~/Models/AccountModel.cs file and add the fields to the UserProfile class: [Table("UserProfile")] public class UserProfile { [Key] ...


7

After more searching I finally managed to find the answer. The solution is to use the type name qualified by its namespace. This means that for my issue I used: <add name="Websites" type="System.Collections.Generic.List`1[System.String]" serializeAs="Binary"/> I also found out that it is also possible to specify classes defined in other assemblies. ...


7

You might use one ugly workaround which includes changing aspnet_Profile_GetProperties stored procedure. This one is responsible for getting the properties while accessing user profile. Open this procedure and you will find following code at the bottom: IF (@@ROWCOUNT > 0) BEGIN UPDATE dbo.aspnet_Users SET LastActivityDate=@CurrentTimeUtc ...


6

Basically the way it works is by using the authentication information to identify the user. So when a request comes in from an authenticated user the framework uses the username (typically in the form of an authentication cookie) to load the profile information into the current request. In the case of the example you provided because the author is using ...


6

The naming of the function is counter intuitive, but ProfileBase.Create(username) will load the existing profile for an existing user or create a new profile if none exists. var profile = ProfileBase.Create(userName); This will not load the profile into ControllerContext.HttpContext.Profile but at least you can access or alter the user profile.


5

You'll probably want to hand-code that. There's nothing intrinsic to ASP.NET for managing user files. However, the code to do so should be relatively easy. Assuming the username is unique and never changes, you can combine the username with a path (use Path.Combine) and upload to that location. I would also lock down that location so that nobody else can ...


5

Try getting the profile for that user's username by: ProfileBase profile = ProfileBase.Create(model.UserName); Yes, create 'gets' the profile for the user you just created, not just creates it (misleading!). Then you can use: profile["FirstName"] = model.FirstName; profile["LastName"] = model.LastName; Don't forget to call profile.Save(); after setting ...


3

I have always eschewed the ASP .NET Membership provider in favor of a custom implementation of IPrincipal for one simple reason. I've almost never needed the out-of-the-box functionality it provides. Any custom implementation means creating your own implementation of MembershipProvider. Amongst other methods that I have never implemented, it includes ...


3

You use cache typically when you want to improve site performance: reduce database calls, accessing files on filesystem, calling external services, etc. Scenario 1: Assume there is an application which has a page that lists all products stored in database. Users have need in product list filtering feature (like on ebay or amazon for example). Also it is ...


3

When you use the AspDotNetProfile provider without providing a provider configuration in your web.config file, you are using the provider configuration in your machine.config file. Here's a sample from the default machine.config file distributed with .NET 4.0: <profile> <providers> <add name="AspNetSqlProfileProvider" ...


3

The way that I've done it in the past is to use a base upload folder (say uploads) and in that folder create a folder using the user's ID from the DB. So the structure would be ..\uploads\145 for user with a user ID of 145. The first thing that my code does is to check to see if the folder exists and if not then calls a Directory.Create() (or whatever the ...


3

When you add the profile you've called it SqlProvider instead of SqlServices. (the default profile provider name you used above)


3

When you are in the page you have the ProfileCommon class available to you for accessing the profile. The profilecommon class is automatically generated by asp.net from you web.config profile settings during compilation of the web project. In case you want to use the profile from app_code folder, you will have to use the profilebase class. Profilecommon ...


3

SqlProfileProvider persists profile properties in three fields of the aspnet_Profile table: PropertyNames, PropertyValuesString, and PropertyValuesBinary. The following is a synopsis of what's stored in each field: * PropertyNames holds a string value containing information about the profile property values present in the PropertyValuesString and ...


3

There may not be any benefit for you. Profiles allow you to manage user information without requiring you to create and maintain your own database. You've already got that covered, so the only other major advantage that I can think of is that profiles provide are an easy way of handling migration of anonymous usage data to the user's profile when ...


3

Yes, but you'll have to use a custom profile provider. This one, created by Microsoft employee Hao Kung should do what you are looking for.


3

In the web.config file is a commented out section controlling whether the profile service is enabled. Enabling it changes the generated code and HttpContext becomes available. You don't have the class that descends from ProfileBase to present profile properties as strongly typed properties. This however is hardly a disaster, you just use ...


3

There is no query API for Profile, but this may give you some guidance: var usersWithNonZeroCounter = Membership.GetAllUsers().Cast<MembershipUser>() .Where(user => true /*insert your user criteria here*/) .Select(user => ProfileBase.Create(user.UserName, true)) .Where(profile => ((int)profile["counter"]) > 0 /*insert your ...


3

Are you sure you are matching your field names with the property names? Email != EmailAddress && Telephone != TelephoneNumber


3

Try adding a <clear /> tag immediately after the <connectionStrings> tag. I seem to remember having a similar problem years ago that was caused by my web.config inheriting a connection string from somewhere else. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ayb15wz8.aspx <connectionStrings> <clear /> <add name="Database" ...


3

The profile is by default automatically saved at the end of the execution of an ASP.NET page, see the profile Element (ASP.NET Settings Schema) documentation on this. This explains the second "mysterious" save that you observe. You can try to change automaticSaveEnabled to false.


3

Typically ASP.NET treats profile data as a property bag - so it would probably skip a property (that has been stored in data store) but deleted from configuration. Similarly, for newly added property, it would use the default value. Now, type of properties will also matter - if property type is your custom class then its serialization will be handled by ...


3

Without the protocol etc it isn't an absolute uri, so the browser (correctly) treats it as relative to the current URL. So yes: check for a protocol. Perhaps just StartsWith is enough here, else a regex or maybe Uri.TryCreate (or whatever it is) specifying absolute-only. Personally I would do this check at the point of data-entry, not at display.


3

Well, that is a bit too much to write here, but you will find an excellent series of articles here http://www.4guysfromrolla.com/articles/120705-1.aspx


3

Add the fields to the profile section of Web.Config. <profile> <properties> <add name="FirstName" /> <add name="LastName" /> <add name="Address1" /> <add name="Address2" /> <add name="City" /> <add name="State" /> <add name="Zip" /> <add name="Phone" /> <add ...


3

I made it work by making some changes related to default profile provider name in the web.config: <profile enabled="true" defaultProvider="AspNetSqlProfileProvider"> <providers> <clear/> <add name="AspNetSqlProfileProvider" applicationName="/" connectionStringName="ApplicationServices" ...


2

the important part of the code that brings together the cart and the Profile is at the very end (happens behind the scenes for every login): void Profile_OnMigrateAnonymous(object sender, ProfileMigrateEventArgs e) { ProfileCommon anonymousProfile = Profile.GetProfile(e.AnonymousID); if (anonymousProfile.SCart != null) { if ...


2

If you insist on using SQL, I'm sure a large number of SUBSTRINGs and PATINDEXes will get you there but it won't be a clean solution. Update: user373721 found a great resource and posted a comment about it, but it can be easily missed, so I decided to add it to the answer, too - How to get asp.net profile value from MS SQL database using T-SQL? The ...



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