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Please correct me if I am wrong but, if you do: Artist artist = new Artist(); then that instance is not managed by Spring, hence its attributes are not autowired. That is why you get the NPE.


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Listing args is option you can just say the execution pointcut. you can refer to below link for the AOP spring. http://docs.spring.io/spring/docs/current/spring-framework-reference/html/aop.html or to be in short you can use the below thing for your reference.. @Pointcut("execution(public * *(..))") private void anyPublicOperation() {} ...


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Here is a solution using APT (annotation processing tool) via AspectJ. It adds the specified annotations to getter methods, but does not remove them from fields. So this is a "copy" action, not a "move". Annotation processing support was added to AspectJ in version 1.8.2 and described in the release notes. Here is some self-consistent sample code. I ...


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Maybe you want to change this <aop:advisor pointcut="com.test.aop.PointcutDefinition()" advice-ref="tx-advice"/> to that <aop:advisor pointcut="com.test.aop.PointcutDefinition.authenticator()" advice-ref="tx-advice"/> This should fix the syntax error. As for making an aspect or advice transactional in Spring AOP, I do not know if it is ...


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As mentionned in M.Deinum comment, I forgot the @EnableAspectJAutoProxy in my configuration class, this fixed the problem. Will flag this as the right answer when allowed.


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Just to add, there is possibility to change log level for adviceDidNotMatch for aspectj-maven-plugin <plugin> <groupId>org.codehaus.mojo</groupId> <artifactId>aspectj-maven-plugin</artifactId> <artifactId>1.5</artifactId> <configuration> ...


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Very similar to my answer here which sheltem already pointed to, the solution looks like this (in annotation-style syntax this time because in Spring AOP you cannot use native AspectJ syntax): Original poster's annotation: package annotations; import java.lang.annotation.ElementType; import java.lang.annotation.Retention; import ...


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This is what I ended up at after fiddling about with it (imports omitted): @Aspect public class VerifyAspect { @Before("execution(* *(.., @annotations.MyAnnotation (*), ..)) && args(.., verifyMe)") public void verifyInvestigationId(final Object verifyMe) { System.out.println("Aspect verifying: " + verifyMe); } } No need for ...


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use this procJoinpoint.getSourceLocation().getLine() @Around("execution (* com.logger.rms.*.*(..))") public Object logAround(ProceedingJoinPoint procJoinpoint) throws Throwable { int line= procJoinpoint.getSourceLocation().getLine(); System.out.println(line); System.out.println("in around before " + procJoinpoint ); ...


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If you are using Spring 4 then all you can use @ControllerAdvice annotation to centralize all the request validations which would seem more helpful from maintainance point of view.


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Change @PropertySource("classpath:applicationConfig.properties") into @PropertySource("classpath:myProps.properties") or use @PropertySources annotation.


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None of the other previous response work. Here's an example working. https://github.com/bdmstyle/springmvcAOPjava8 I hope it helps.


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You could try my library Byte Buddy for this. You can run it within a build process at application startup or even from a Java agent. Creating an annotation can be done as follows using the recent release: DynamicType.Unloaded<?> type = new ByteBuddy() .makeAnnotation() .name("AnnotateGetter") .annotateType(new Target() { public ElementType ...


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still not sure, does AspectJ really improves the caching performance The figures from the article clearly show that AspectJ is far superior (and on eye-level with or even better than manual caching) regarding runtime overhead in comparison to Spring AOP. This is because: Spring uses dynamic proxies (i.e. subclasses or interface implementations ...


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It is actually very simple, and sheltem was right, you can just use Object in the returning type declaration. Here is a little demo showing that it even works for both static and non-static members, as long as they are not declared final: Driver application: package de.scrum_master.app; public class Application { public static final double PI = ...


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I want to be able to apply an aspect to functions of the converter class Well, then change your pointcut so as intercept the methods (not functions, they are called methods) you want to handle in your advice. At the moment the pointcut is execution(* display(..)) I.e. it will intercept all methods named display with any number of parameters and any ...


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Thanks for not updating the question, not posting the actual error message and even hiding your class's imports from your readers' view. :-7 Anyway: The code you posted should work, for me it does in Eclipse without any red underlinings. Here are two variants for your pointcut and advice, on like yours with an ugly cast and usage of getThis() and one more ...


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Considering com.sc.bs.impl.* is business/domain layer package and intercepted it in AOP layer using @Around annotation. Code snippet: @Around("execution(* com.sc.bs.impl..*.*(..))") public Object exceptionHandlerWithReturnType(ProceedingJoinPoint joinPoint) throws Throwable{ try { obj = joinPoint.proceed(); } catch(Exception ex) { ...


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I am not really answering my own question. Just acknowledging that the suggestions given by khmarbaise and sheltem worked for me.


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By default the plugin does not weave the main aspects in the test classes - we simply never made a configuration option for it. You can do this yourself using the following line: testAspectpath sourceSets.main.output


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There is no expression matching TestService#serviceMethod(). In order to make your testcase work you need to advice your service method and (very important) the aspect must be located in the src/test/ package. Otherwise the compiler would not weave it in. // located in `src/test/java` package com.hello.aop; @Aspect class UnsupportedOperationAspect { ...


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You never registered your @Aspect. Add a corresponding bean @Bean public AspectTest aspect() { return new AspectTest(); } You can also make your type a @Component and add an appropriate @ComponentScan in your @Configuration class.


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What you do is a bit strange because on the one hand you configure Spring to use (auto) proxy-based Spring AOP, on the other hand you use AspectJ Maven Plugin to use native AspectJ and do compile-time weaving. Please decide which way you want to go: For Spring AOP you do not need the AspectJ compiler, but then you are stuck with the proxy-based "AOP lite" ...


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The problem is that the AspectJ Runtime aspectjrt.jar is not on your classpath when running the program manually. You should run the program like this: java -cp path\to\aspectjrt.jar -jar target\<my-package>.jar The only way to avoid that is to use a plugin like One-Jar (dependencies are packed into the application JAR and loaded witgh a special ...


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A simple example: Driver application: package de.scrum_master.app; public class Application { public static void sayHelloTo(String name) { System.out.println("Hello " + name + "!"); } public static void main(String[] args) { sayHelloTo("world"); } } Aspect: package de.scrum_master.aspect; import ...


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If you want to know more about the situation of Lombok in combination with AspectJ, please read my other answer and also follow the links there.


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Your understanding is about correct. If you want to avoid too many methods being created, use execution() pointcuts instead of call() wherever possible, because then only one synthetic method per callee will be created, not per caller. I.e. if one method is called from 25 different places, only one additional method will be created instead of 25. ...


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Actually cheeken's answer is nice, but for AspectJ call() pointcuts you can get the calling class much more easily and without ugly reflection: thisEnclosingJoinPointStaticPart.getSignature().getDeclaringType() Please consider to accept this answer if you think it is better than the other one, otherwise just enjoy the power of AspectJ. ;-)


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In order to make Spring AOP work, both your aspect and the target object must be a Spring @Component.


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A while ago I played around with Gradle and Android SDK in connection with AspectJ in order to help another user. Maybe you want to check this answer. P.S.: Your question is very general, so my answer is too. This is StackOverflow, please show some code and/or configuration. Give the community a concrete problem to solve and make your own problem ...


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The AspectJ runtime library aspectjrt.jar must be on your classpath, so it should be a Maven <dependency> not just for the AspectJ Maven Plugin but also for the Maven module as such.


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In addition to what manish and fateddy have said, please also note that SimpleService needs to be a Spring @Component in order to make it work with Spring AOP.


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Two ideas: Probably you want to change one of your pointcuts to also find subpackages (use .. syntax instead of .): @Pointcut("execution (* my.web..*Controller.*(..))") The same applies to your aop.xml: <include within="cdot..*"/> I assume that my.web was changed by you deliberately and actually reads cdot.something, because otherwise the ...


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I tried with IDEA 14.1.1 Ultimate and it works nicely, even though AspectJ support in IDEA is generally not as advanced as in Eclipse, even though all in all IDEA to me is superior. But for AspectJ I often use Eclipse. I think it would be a good idea to "mavenise" your project. This way it would work in Eclipse and IDEA. In IDEA activate auto import for ...


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IMO @EnableAspectJAutoProxy does not make sense for a native AspectJ aspect. It only works for Spring AOP aspects. So you have two options: Either you compile your native AspectJ aspect right into your Spring application via Ajc (AspectJ compiler). In this case you do not need any annotations to get the aspects running, only aspectjrt.jar on the classpath ...


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AFAIK there is no such option or plugin, unless you decide to write one or open a ticket for AspectJ Maven. One question before we continue: Are you really sure you want to weave all dependencies? What about libraries such as JUnit or Log4J in your aspect POM? The way I usually go about weaving my aspects into the code - if they are production and not just ...


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The usual pattern for adding a set of non-static methods to multiple classes is to define an interface + implementing methods within an aspect and use declare parents in order to make the target classes implement the interface. Unfortunately this does not work for static methods like main because static methods cannot be defined via an interface. On the ...


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It can be a sneaky Java8 interface problem. In Java8 the charSequence has a default method attached. If you are using it from Java7 compiler doesn't allow you to use default methods. Try to fix the jdk 1.8 patch setup.


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After more research, I have been able to get everything working as expected. Here are the final build.gradle files: Project build.gradle: buildscript { repositories { jcenter() } dependencies { classpath 'com.android.tools.build:gradle:1.1.0' } } allprojects { repositories { jcenter() } } app module ...


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The plus would make a difference if you are working with types that subclass a type in the com.webtier package but are not in the com.webtier package. The plus would mean that those types would also be considered when computing cflow. If that doesn't happen in your application then the plus makes no difference. It also makes a difference whether your Foo ...


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There is always the if() pointcut expression that allows you to define a condition to be checked by the advice: https://www.eclipse.org/aspectj/doc/next/adk15notebook/ataspectj-pcadvice.html#d0e3697 And... your aspect already is a Spring @Component. Why not just inject properties via @Value and decide on them whether your advice should execute? You can do ...


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This is how I successfully did 1) see what is your eclipse version from (Help->About ADT) or (Help->About Eclipse) 2) get the url of AspectJ from this url https://eclipse.org/ajdt/downloads/ 3) goto Help->Install New Software and add the path install the software and enjoy! see the video for detail help : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EJMUgOrffFY ...


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It was a bug: https://bugs.eclipse.org/bugs/show_bug.cgi?id=462146 it is solved now, see developers snapshot.


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Since your aspect works in a plain java AspectJ project in Eclipse - at least for me - the problem must be your weaving configuration. One thing sticks out immediately: <basedir>src/main/resources</basedir> Why are you trying to apply your aspect to your resources and not your code(src/main/java as default in maven projects)? Changing that ...


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Depending on your build system you should look into the ajc compiler and associated tools (Maven: http://mojo.codehaus.org/aspectj-maven-plugin/ or Ant: https://eclipse.org/aspectj/doc/next/devguide/antTasks.html)


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You are mixing up two AOP styles here: Spring AOP ist a proxy-bases "AOP lite" approach which is activated via @EnableAspectJAutoProxy. It only works for public, non-static methods of Spring components. AspectJ, a full-blown AOP framework which also works on package-local or private methods, no matter if they are Spring components or not, is enabled from ...



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