Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

I used a similar test with AspectJ load time weaving for intended printing of all function calls within my package. Best way of load time weaving is you dont dirty your classes like compile time wevaing. When you remove -javaagent:<path to aspectj lib> and your custom astpect lib classpath entry from your run command. Then all all gone, clear. I made ...


1

Yes. Suppose you have this class: public class TestClass { public static void main( String[] args ) { new TestClass().print(); } public void print() { System.out.println("Hello World"); } } And these aspects: public aspect FirstAspect { public pointcut hello1() : execution(void TestClass.print()); void around() : hello1() { ...


1

The simple answer is "yes, but..." Keeping it simple, what AspectJ does is basically going pointcut-to-pointcut and searching how to weave it, and then, well, weaves it. In the case of two pointcuts to the same method, one of the pointcuts will weave and then the other one will weave and will basically override that first weaving. Unless the second pointcut ...


1

Found solution to this using maven. One needs to add aspectj-maven-plugin in pom.xml. < plugin > < groupId > org.codehaus.mojo < /groupId> <artifactId>aspectj-maven-plugin</artifactId > < version > 1.4 < /version> <configuration> <source>1.7</source > <target > ...


0

If using annotation style aspects and compiling with javac you need the aspect to be 'finished off' at loadtime with a pass through the weaver itself. If you don't then it can't generate the helper methods like aspectOf() that will be called from other woven types attempting to use the aspect. The NoSuchMethodError for aspectOf() tells me the aspect is not ...


0

Got it working. My updated pom.xml <build> <plugins> <plugin> <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId> <artifactId>maven-surefire-plugin</artifactId> <configuration> <forkMode>once</forkMode> ...


1

No. A pointcut is a boolean function that determines whether an aspect applies. It does not influence the ordering of aspects. Moreover, in general it would be impossible to infer such an ordering from pointcut expressions. For instance, consider: @First @Second @Third void foo(); and the pointcut expressions: execution(public * (@First *).*(..)) ...


0

I think you could probably do it by putting the resolved params in a globally accessible data structure (e.g. a Singleton having some sort of Map or Set), but I wouldn't recommend that kind of approach. I don't know why you don't like having all the params in your method signatures, but that is the intended way of declaring rest services, e.g. @GET ...


0

The alternative way to make it work is to add the following code in your security.xml <intercept-url pattern="/user/**" access="hasRole('ROLE_ADMIN')" /> It will ensure that only admin can access the resources starting with pattern /user/.


2

You can access the join point with thisJoinPoint inside your aspect. You can access your parameters with thisJoinPoint.getArgs(). Additionally you can access the signature of your method call with thisJoinPointStaticPart. E.g. you can access the method name with thisJoinPointStaticPart.getSignature().getName(). For further information please use the ...


4

Sorry If I misunderstood but this should bring the parameters Object[] args = thisJoinPoint.getArgs();


1

Documentation reference The answer was quite simple. All we had to do was to replace compile-time weaving with load-time weaving. Load-time weaving means that we're going to weave our classes when JVM tries to load their. Replace is neccesary, beacause compile-time weaving and load-time weaving are not compatible with each other. So, assume we have two ...


1

AspectJ supports quite simply PointCut Designators for annotated method. For your use case, it is : public aspect ValidateAspect { pointcut publicMethodExecuted(): @annotation(Validatable); int around() : publicMethodExecuted() { //performing some validation and changing return value } }


1

You can perform what you want once you get the annotations belonging to the int method() method using the following code : pointcut publicMethodExecuted(): execution(public int <classname>.method()); int around() : publicMethodExecuted() { //performing some validation and changing return value MethodSignature signature = (MethodSignature) ...


1

You could call it from the superclass using reflection. import java.lang.reflect.Method; class Person { public void greet() { System.out.println("Person's greet"); } } class Employee extends Person { public void greet() { System.out.println("Employee's greet"); } } class Main { public static void main(String[] args) throws ...


1

Your configuration seems flawed try this instead: <configuration> <aspectDirectory>src/main/aspects</aspectDirectory> </configuration> you could omit this completely, if you used the default src/main/aspect directory.


1

[INFO] No modifications found skipping aspectJ compile Yes. that explains it. This is normally done by comparing dates of files, e.g. the source files and the class files. This is probably caused by your IDE. There's a flag for the plugin called forceAjcCompile, however, I see that the plugin writers forgot to expose it for the commandline. Simple (not ...


1

By default the aspectj-maven-plugin expects the aspects in the directory src/main/aspect. If you want to store them in a different directory, you have to specify the configuration: <configuration> <aspectDirectory>src/main/aspects</aspectDirectory> </configuration>


1

Try configuring the plugin as the documentation describes: In order to apply already compiled aspects to your own sources you need do setup all the JAR files you would like to weave in the plugin configuration as shown below. which would be <plugin> <groupId>org.codehaus.mojo</groupId> ...


2

You are using dynamic proxy approach where proxy object is created at runtime. This proxy object uses inheritance for proxying target methods. Since you can not inherit a static method, this approach wont work for static methods. For creating proxy for static methods you need to use AspectJ's compile time weaving. You can refer this link for more info. This ...


0

An working source-code example can be found here on GitHub Generally the instructions here are also valid for usage with bndtools. Add the required bundles -runbundles: \ org.eclipse.equinox.weaving.aspectj,\ org.aspectj.runtime,\ org.aspectj.weaver Make sure that the org.eclipse.equinox.weaving.hook is co-located -runpath: ...


0

From the official javadoc about @Order: Annotation that defines ordering. The value is optional, and represents order value as defined in the Ordered interface. Lower values have higher priority. The default value is Ordered.LOWEST_PRECEDENCE, indicating lowest priority (losing to any other specified order value). This means that Aspect2 will also have ...


0

The warning you can surpress with @SuppressAjWarnings({"adviceDidNotMatch"}). Make sure your new method is declared public. Try specifying any return type in the execution like: pointcut myPointcut2() : execution(* oldshape.Point.new(..)); If that is not working, try a wildcard for the method name as well. Something like: pointcut myPointcut2() : ...


0

The solution is inspired by an article by Ben Galbraith, and uses AspectJ. It requires absolutely no changes to existing model classes. Installing AspectJ is beyond the scope of this tutorial, suffice to say that all major IDEs support it (installing it in Eclipse is trivial). This example assumes that all your model classes extend a base class, called ...


0

The snap methods need to be part of the public API. package com.springpractice.app; import org.springframework.stereotype.Component; @Component("camera") public class Camera implements PhotoSnapper { public Camera() { //System.out.println("Hello from constructor"); } public void snap() { System.out.println("Snaped a ...


1

For the load time weaving use case I don't expect the advice to apply when you compile it. With load time weaving the advice will apply when the system loads the types involved. This means on compilation you will typically see an adviceDidNotMatch. You can suppress it by adding an annotation to the advice: @SuppressAjWarnings("adviceDidNotMatch") Now if ...


0

I made my own plugin supports aspectj with retrolambda. GradleAndroidAspectJPlugin When the project is using retrolambda. You have to recompile the classes using ant iajc after retrolamda compiled. project.configurations { aspectjTaskClasspath aspectsInPath } project.repositories { mavenCentral() } def ...


1

After read document from ant ajcTask, I finally implement with my gradle plugin GradleAndroidAspectJPlugin. I use the iajc classpath and inpath property to specify which classes(jars) will be compile as classpath or will be re-compile from aspectj compiler. def aopTask = project.task("compile${buildTypeName}AspectJ") { doFirst { ...


0

solved by myself. the problem is not function literal, but type "Long". If I use "java.lang.Long" in that situation, that works. for generic type, AspectJ expects "Type",not primitive. in Scala, numeric type values like Int, Long, even Boolean are equivalent to java primitive type


1

Does it mean "get all join points that are in P, then add all join points that are in Q, then match on anything that flows from any of them"? No, it means get all join points that are in P and in Q so it's intersection. Or does it mean "get all join points in P that are also in Q", i.e. all flow points within X() below? Yes for "get all ...


0

Here is a simple example with AspectJ Load-Time Weaving on GitHub https://github.com/medvedev1088/aspectj-ltw-example It uses Joda Time library to demonstrate how to intercept the DateTime#toString() method invocations. The aspect: @Aspect public class DateTimeToStringAspect { public static final String TO_STRING_RESULT = "test"; ...


0

I solved it for existing compliance level by upgrading aspectjweaver jar. Use aspectjweaver-1.7.3.jar


1

only spring beans could be advised Well, it's true in case you are using Spring AOP and not(!!!) AspectJ. If replacing Spring AOP with AspectJ is an option, you can weave what ever you like by using @Configurable Here You can find the documentation that says that you can put Spring annotations like @Transactional on your non beans instances.



Top 50 recent answers are included