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1

From Download eclipse-equinox-common-3.5.0.jar: Files contained in eclipse-equinox-common-3.5.0.jar: .api_description META-INF/ECLIPSEF.RSA META-INF/ECLIPSEF.SF META-INF/MANIFEST.MF META-INF/eclipse.inf ... org.eclipse.core.runtime.Assert.class org.eclipse.core.runtime.AssertionFailedException.class So it looks like you are missing the latest version ...


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The latest version of HHVM should, in theory, support pretty much every feature present in PHP 5.5. This includes that second argument for the assert function. I can't find a link to support this statement at the moment, but I will edit and add it if I find it later. Make sure you're running the latest version of HHVM (3.2 at the time when I'm writing ...


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Just as a note, I was able to figure out another means to solve the trailing comma issue, in addition to @cmaster and @ds27680's solution. Since having __VA_ARGS__ leads to an extra comma, I can pack __VA_ARGS__ into a std::tuple or a function call, and use the tuple/result as a parameter of the real function. Now empty __VA_ARGS__'s won't be a problem ...


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Place the token pasting operator (##) before __VA_ARGS__. This will have as effect deleting of the comma before __VA_ARGS__ if __VA_ARGS__ is empty. Your macro will be then: #define dbgassert(EX,...) \ (void)((EX) || (realdbgassert (#EX, __FILE__, __LINE__, ##__VA_ARGS__),0)) Please note that the token pasting is an GNU CPP extension as one of the ...


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Your problem is the value of __VA_ARGS__ which is empty in the problem case. So, when the preprocessor expands realdbgassert(#EX, __FILE__, __LINE__, __VA_ARGS__), the result is an unfinished parameter list realdbgassert("1>2", "foo.c", 42, ). Note that the parameter list is not correctly terminated due to the empty expansion of __VA_ARGS__. To fix this, ...


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You're assuming that assert is implemented by calling __assert. This may well be how one particular implementation works, but certainly cannot be depended on in general. Instead, follow the documentation: test your condition and on failure emit diagnostic information to standard error, then call std::abort.


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You have to write the contents of the function __assert - if you specified it's extern you should attach the file that contains the function's definition to the compilation process. If you don't know how to write a multiple-file program, I can't really help you.


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Go to Window -> Preferences -> Java -> Installed JREs -> select your installed JVM -> Edit.. -> in "Default VM arguments:" add -ea. Finally make sure that your project uses same JVM in which you added -ea as default argument. To do that : right click on project -> Properties -> JavaBuildPath -> Libraries here you should see JRE system library[...]. Make ...


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Keep parentheses around the x != 0. That might fix your problem.


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Try: <assert test="not(@endDate lt @startDate)"/>


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This topic isn't really specific to Sitecore, even though in this case the assert methods are within the Sitecore library. In general, assertions are used to ensure your code is correct during development, and exception handling makes sure your code copes in unpredictable circumstances. Take a look at these SO questions for some very good explanations. ...


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The comma is being treated as a argument separator for the macro, but parenthesis in your second case protect the arguments. We can see this by going to the draft C++ standard section 16.3 Macro replacement which says (emphasis mine): The sequence of preprocessing tokens bounded by the outside-most matching parentheses forms the list of arguments for ...


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assert is a preprocessor macro. Preprocessor macros are dumb; they don't understand templates. The preprocessor sees 10 tokens within the parentheses: assert( std :: is_same < int , int > :: value ); It splits at the comma. It doesn't know that this is the wrong place to split at, because it doesn't understand that std::is_same<int and ...


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For fixed form sources, one can use -fd-lines-as-comments for release builds and -fd-lines-as-code for debug build (Intel Fortran -d-lines) and use custom assert: D if (assert_condition) then D write(*,*) 'assert message' D call exit(1) D endif


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Sounds like you want to use your assertions as debug statements in the event of a failure. This should help... import traceback try: assert 1 == 2 except AssertionError: traceback.print_exc() This prints: Traceback (most recent call last): File "./foo.py", line 4, in <module> assert 1 == 2


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The only real requirement of using static_assert is that the expression used must be a constant expression (i.e. the value must be determinable at compile-time), so you will run into an issue if you attempt to use a value that is not known until run-time. So as long as the values you use are compile-time constants you should be fine.


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In order to test that a context object contains a certain string, I use this for example with the Django User model: self.assertEqual(response.context['user'].username, 'username_here')


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There is no way to specify ignoreCase in the Assert.Contains. Whether it's something that is overlooked or intended I do not know. You can, however, use StringAssert.AreEqualIgnoringCase(left, right); in your unit tests to achieve the same results. Alternatively, if you wish to stick with the Assert.Foo() "theme", you could do something like this: ...


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You can set it for separate tasks, eg. tests: javaOptions in test += "-ea" or simply set it everywhere: javaOptions += "-ea" Regardless, @MPirious is right in that you typically don't want to cause assertion failures through unit testing. A unit test is supposed to sandbox your code's logic


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Your use of "assert" is a keyword in java. They need to be enabled by by supplying JVM option "-ea". I think, you want to use the static methods of org.junit.Assert. @Test public void test() { org.junit.Assert.assertTrue(SOME CONDITION); }


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MongoDB has a bug where properties that should be non-enumerable are enumerated: Eg, an array whose values are: [ '0', '1'] has the following keys, according to Object.keys(): [ '0', '1', '_atomics', 'validators', '_path', '_parent', '_schema' ] Note Mongo now uses V8, which supports ES5, which has had the ability to create non-enumerable properties ...


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As answered before, there are many ways of dealing with exceptions in JUnit. But with Java 8 there is another one: using Lambda Expressions. With Lambda Expressions we can achieve a syntax like this: @Test public void verifiesTypeAndMessage() { assertThrown(new DummyService()::someMethod) .isInstanceOf(RuntimeException.class) ...


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What about an exception, and a nice decorator to catch it: class AssertError(Exception): pass def assertLike(view): def wrap(request, *args, **kwargs): try: return view(request, *args, **kwargs): except AssertError as e: return HttpResponseServerError(...) return wrap @assertLike def createTask(request): ...


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Here I present the generator based solution: def assertLike(view): def wrap(request, *args, **kwargs): for response in view(request, *args, **kwargs): if response: return response return wrap @other_django_views @another_django_view @assertLike def createTask(request): import json def err(msg=None): ...


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Testing for "no exception thrown" is of some value, but I would try to also test for possible side effects from the void method. (Properties set etc). If this is a repository method it might actually be more valuable to write an integration test instead where you test that the correct row was inserted into the database.


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I can't help with python, but can give a general suggestion and Java code for those who are looking to do something similar in Java. My approach would be Get the src attribute of the image and make a quick HTTP GET call and make sure you get 200 OK response. Once thats done, you could check the naturalWidthattribute of the WebElement using ...


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The asserts in the main method test assertions about static final fields, the asserts in the constructor test assertions about non-static final fields. Since assertions about static fields shouldn't be tested every time an object is created and non-static fields need a instance, it makes sense to place the assertions there. However I would recommend writing ...


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assert is a java keyword that lets you test some condition (and enforce that it is valid). The format used here is assert <boolean> You will see that that the expression after the assert evaluates to a boolean in both cases. You can read more about it in this Oracle documentation.


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There's nothing at all wrong in using an assertion in a public method. They could be used to check that certain invariants (things you believe to be true), about the object or class that you're calling the method of - are in fact true. For example you could use an assertion as I have done, in the public build() method of a builder, to make sure that the ...



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