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4

Since Bash 4.3, declare has a flag -n to define references (this is loosely equivalent to references in C++). This flag tremendously simplifies your problem here: fullname() { declare -nl pointer="$1" for i in "${!pointer[@]}" do echo "${pointer[$i]} $i" done } It will be safe if you're having spaces or funny symbols in the keys of ...


3

If I understood your requirement correctly: array_map(function($elem) { return array_unique($elem); });


3

Instead of stopping your loop at a particular point, why not echo based on the sub-array values' existence? foreach($Quest as $Value) { echo '<font size="3">'; // No one uses <font> anymore by the way if (isset($Value['username'])) echo "<b>Username: </b>", $Value['username'],"&nbsp;","&nbsp;"; if ...


2

By nesting references with $cur = &$cur[$v]; you can read and modify the original value: Live example on ide1: http://ideone.com/xtmrr8 $array = array('x' => array('y' => array('z' => 20))); $keys = array('x', 'y', 'z'); // Start nesting new keys $cur = &$array; foreach($keys as $v){ $cur = &$cur[$v]; } echo $cur; // prints 20 ...


2

Use an object, not an array. var result = {}; Now to fill it you can just: result[es] = result[es] + 1 || 1 And your for...in loop should work (but you should use .hasOwnProperty for sanity's sake). for (var key in result) { if (result.hasOwnProperty(key)) { counter += result[key]; if(counter > max){ ...


2

I suggest to use later form of array declaration , as there is no confusion or conflicts to pick the elements with that associated key, if you want to create any array that uses key to identify apples in this example, you can create an array like below, so it will resolve you conflicts. $yesorno = array ( 'apples'=>array( ...


2

Mark bakers answer is best for one option. You can convert all of the array with array_values eg $new_array = array_values($old_array); echo $new_array[0][0]; It depends how many times you wish to access the array http://php.net/manual/en/function.array-values.php


2

What PHP is doing is using your string as a numeric index. In this case, 'anystring' is the equivalent of 0. You can test this by doing <?php echo (int)'anystring'; // 0 var_dump('anystring' == 0); // bool(true) PHP does a lot of type juggling, which can lead to "interesting" results.


2

Here is another difference which is not that commonly known. You can compare two nested tables with = or <> but associative array you cannot. DECLARE TYPE associative_array IS TABLE OF INTEGER INDEX BY PLS_INTEGER; a_var_associative_array associative_array; b_var_associative_array associative_array; TYPE nested_table IS TABLE OF ...


2

So you're needing the keys of Object whose value matches certain pattern. You could use [].filter on Object.keys(gh) which returns an Array of keys for the Object passed in. var str = "ora", gh = { pop: 'apple', jim: 'orange', john: 'ball', sim: 'oran' }; var output = Object.keys(gh).filter(function(key){ return gh[key].indexOf(str) == 0; // condition ...


1

This is creating an associative array - a key, value pair - in memory indexed or keyed by the customers email address. The array's value is a record of the same structure as a row in the customers table e.g. v_cust_by_email('joe.bloggs@anisp.com') = customer('Joe', 'Bloggs', 100.00) v_cust_by_email('john.doe@anotherisp.com') = customer('John', 'Doe', ...


1

$a is a string not an associative array. If you want to access it that way you have to do something like this. $a['anystring'] = 'TESTSTRING';


1

You need to use array_key_exists() to test if a key exists


1

The working of isset is correct in your case. Because $a is a string, the index-operator will give you the specified char in the string at the declared position. (like a "Char-Array") A small example: $a = 'TESTSTRING'; echo $a[0]; // Output: T echo $a[1]; // Output: E // ... This will output the first and the second character at index 0 and 1 of the ...


1

Simple explanation of associative arrays (aka maps), not specifically for awk: Unlike a normal array, where each element has a numeric index, an associative array uses a "key" instead of an index. You can think of it as being like a simple flat-file database, where each record has a key and a value. So if you have, e.g. some salary data: Fred 10000 John ...


1

A nested table is just an array of n elements. declare type nested_table_of_integer is table of integer; v_my_nested_table nested_table_of_integer; begin v_my_nested_table := nested_table_of_integer(); -- initialize v_my_nested_table.extend(10); -- add 10 elements v_my_nested_table(1) := 100; v_my_nested_table(11) := 1000; -- ORA-06533: ...


1

If just want the key, then you can use array_keys to get an array of keys. $keys = array_keys($var); echo $keys[1]; // category2336


1

You mentioned "bucket" index so I assume you mean hash tables with separate chaining as collision resolution, in this case there is no reasons for using modulo or bit mask "stronger" that you mentioned (which BTW not so obvious, as you said). In some languages, most notably Java/JVM-based, array index is positive signed 32-bit integer, thus maximum array ...


1

indir_keys() { eval "echo \${!$1[@]}" } indir_val() { eval "echo \${$1[$2]}" } fullname() { pointer=$1 for i in $(indir_keys $pointer) do echo "$i $(indir_val $pointer $i)" done } Gives: Jack Ketchum Clive Barker Stephen King H.P. Lovecraft


1

Maybe not exactly the answer you are looking for, but I would take a look at the Options API. It saves your options into the database and is very easy to use. // Functions.php add_option( 'isBoxedLayout', true, '', 'yes' ); // template-tags.php $isBoxedLayout = get_option( 'isBoxedLayout' );



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