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0

Ok, I apologize for not having expressed my question more clearly, originally, but I got it to work as I was hoping, with a variable variable, as follows: $keystring = ''; foreach ($keys as $key) { $keystring .= "['$key']"; } Then iterate the main array, for each of the country entries in it, and access the desired value as: eval('$value = $entry' . ...


0

Loop through the array of indexes, traveling down the initial array step by step until you reach the end of the index array. $array1 = array('x' => array('y' => array('z' => 20))); $keys = array('x', 'y', 'z'); $array_data = &$array1; foreach($keys as $key){ $array_data = &$array_data[$key]; } echo $array_data;


1

By nesting references with $cur = &$cur[$v]; you can read and modify the original value: Live example on ide1: http://ideone.com/xtmrr8 $array = array('x' => array('y' => array('z' => 20))); $keys = array('x', 'y', 'z'); // Start nesting new keys $cur = &$array; foreach($keys as $v){ $cur = &$cur[$v]; } echo $cur; // prints 20 ...


-1

If I understand you correctly, you can do it like: $myarray[$array[0]][$array[1]][$array[2]]


3

Instead of stopping your loop at a particular point, why not echo based on the sub-array values' existence? foreach($Quest as $Value) { echo '<font size="3">'; // No one uses <font> anymore by the way if (isset($Value['username'])) echo "<b>Username: </b>", $Value['username'],"&nbsp;","&nbsp;"; if ...


2

So you're needing the keys of Object whose value matches certain pattern. You could use [].filter on Object.keys(gh) which returns an Array of keys for the Object passed in. var str = "ora", gh = { pop: 'apple', jim: 'orange', john: 'ball', sim: 'oran' }; var output = Object.keys(gh).filter(function(key){ return gh[key].indexOf(str) == 0; // condition ...


3

Since Bash 4.3, declare has a flag -n to define references (this is loosely equivalent to references in C++). This flag tremendously simplifies your problem here: fullname() { declare -nl pointer="$1" for i in "${!pointer[@]}" do echo "${pointer[$i]} $i" done } It will be safe if you're having spaces or funny symbols in the keys of ...


0

From the Bash Reference Guide: The positional parameters are temporarily replaced when a shell function is executed (see Shell Functions). So you could do this: fullname() { for first do echo "$first ${writer[$first]}" done } fullname "${!writer[@]}"


1

indir_keys() { eval "echo \${!$1[@]}" } indir_val() { eval "echo \${$1[$2]}" } fullname() { pointer=$1 for i in $(indir_keys $pointer) do echo "$i $(indir_val $pointer $i)" done } Gives: Jack Ketchum Clive Barker Stephen King H.P. Lovecraft


1

You mentioned "bucket" index so I assume you mean hash tables with separate chaining as collision resolution, in this case there is no reasons for using modulo or bit mask "stronger" that you mentioned (which BTW not so obvious, as you said). In some languages, most notably Java/JVM-based, array index is positive signed 32-bit integer, thus maximum array ...


1

If just want the key, then you can use array_keys to get an array of keys. $keys = array_keys($var); echo $keys[1]; // category2336


2

Mark bakers answer is best for one option. You can convert all of the array with array_values eg $new_array = array_values($old_array); echo $new_array[0][0]; It depends how many times you wish to access the array http://php.net/manual/en/function.array-values.php


0

array_map Returns an array containing all the elements of array after applying the callback function to each one. for example: $a=array("a","bb","ccd","fdjkfgf"); $b = array_map("strlen",$a); print_r($b); //output Array ( [0] => 1 //like strlen(a) [1] => 2 //like strlen(bb) [2] => 3 //like strlen(ccd) [3] => 7 ...


0

You can use array_values(): $x = [ ['foo1'=>'bar', 'foo2'=>'bar', 'foo3'=>'bar'], ['foo1'=>'bar', 'foo3'=>'bar', 'foo5'=>'bar'], ['foo1'=>'bar', 'foo3'=>'bar', 'foo5'=>'bar']]; unset($x[0]); $x = array_values($x); print_r($x); output: Array ( [0] => Array ( [foo1] => bar ...


0

Say you have these array values in $data. Then you removed the element ex: unset($data[0]); Now $data will have [1] => Array ( [foo]=>bar [foo]=>bar [foo]=>bar ) [2] => Array ( [foo]=>bar [foo]=>bar [foo]=>bar ) Now use the function array_values() $data = array_values($data); Now the associative ...


0

Suppose $arr = array(0=>array('a','b','c'),1=>array('a','b','c'),2=>array('a','b','c')); Then to get your requirement the steps are : unset($arr[0]); $arr = array_values($arr);


0

This is normal JS work. At JS exists reference between Objects (object, array). That's why you must make recursive copy of object (create new object/array), to prevent linking. In our case you can use "concat" function. Example here: http://jsfiddle.net/0a46s334/ enter code here


2

I suggest to use later form of array declaration , as there is no confusion or conflicts to pick the elements with that associated key, if you want to create any array that uses key to identify apples in this example, you can create an array like below, so it will resolve you conflicts. $yesorno = array ( 'apples'=>array( ...


0

This apparently mean that your array was an multi-dimension array. Try to put another foreach loop inside the existing one. Use vardump or print_r to check how does the current data store in $assoc look like foreach($assoc as $key) { foreach($key as $value){ if($ergString=="") { $ergString = $value; } else { ...


0

it works as expected for... it returned false... but when I force it to return true ... itz throws an error saying illegal offset somekind.... but still output the first string.... as anystring casted as int equals to 0.. check the version of php you are using bro... I used notepad++ to create the php file... no special ide...


1

The working of isset is correct in your case. Because $a is a string, the index-operator will give you the specified char in the string at the declared position. (like a "Char-Array") A small example: $a = 'TESTSTRING'; echo $a[0]; // Output: T echo $a[1]; // Output: E // ... This will output the first and the second character at index 0 and 1 of the ...


2

What PHP is doing is using your string as a numeric index. In this case, 'anystring' is the equivalent of 0. You can test this by doing <?php echo (int)'anystring'; // 0 var_dump('anystring' == 0); // bool(true) PHP does a lot of type juggling, which can lead to "interesting" results.


1

You need to use array_key_exists() to test if a key exists


0

Try enabling PHP to show all errors by using error_reporting(E_ALL); This should give you a warning saying you are using an illegal offset. PHP therefore automatically assumes you are looking for the first element in the array or letter in this case.


1

$a is a string not an associative array. If you want to access it that way you have to do something like this. $a['anystring'] = 'TESTSTRING';


1

This is creating an associative array - a key, value pair - in memory indexed or keyed by the customers email address. The array's value is a record of the same structure as a row in the customers table e.g. v_cust_by_email('joe.bloggs@anisp.com') = customer('Joe', 'Bloggs', 100.00) v_cust_by_email('john.doe@anotherisp.com') = customer('John', 'Doe', ...


2

Here is another difference which is not that commonly known. You can compare two nested tables with = or <> but associative array you cannot. DECLARE TYPE associative_array IS TABLE OF INTEGER INDEX BY PLS_INTEGER; a_var_associative_array associative_array; b_var_associative_array associative_array; TYPE nested_table IS TABLE OF ...


1

A nested table is just an array of n elements. declare type nested_table_of_integer is table of integer; v_my_nested_table nested_table_of_integer; begin v_my_nested_table := nested_table_of_integer(); -- initialize v_my_nested_table.extend(10); -- add 10 elements v_my_nested_table(1) := 100; v_my_nested_table(11) := 1000; -- ORA-06533: ...


0

You can access without each loop if you wanted. var obj = JSON.parse(data); var title = obj[0].title;


0

Grandma - let's say you want to make jam out of strawberries, raspberries, and blueberries, one jar of each. You have a shelf on your wall with room/openings for 3 jars on it. That shelf is an associative array: shelf[] Stick a label named "strawberry" beneath any one of the 3 openings. That is the index of an associative array: shelf["strawberry"] Now ...


1

Simple explanation of associative arrays (aka maps), not specifically for awk: Unlike a normal array, where each element has a numeric index, an associative array uses a "key" instead of an index. You can think of it as being like a simple flat-file database, where each record has a key and a value. So if you have, e.g. some salary data: Fred 10000 John ...


0

You have to do this: array_walk($arr, function(&$value) { $value = array_unique($value); }); $arr = array_unique($arr, SORT_REGULAR); array_walk will remove duplicates inside inner arrays. array_unique will do the rest.


3

If I understood your requirement correctly: array_map(function($elem) { return array_unique($elem); });


0

Very helpful. Discusses all good coding styles of PHP. http://framework.zend.com/manual/1.12/en/coding-standard.coding-style.html


0

Why not change your data structure to be able to work with objects? class Player { public $name; // would be better as private and add getters public $rank; public function __construct($name, $rank) { $this->name = $name; $this->rank = $rank; } } Then fill your array (I'm not familiar with soccer): $players = [ // ...


1

Check out this php article also if you want your two arrays to have a relation than you could better write it like this: array( array( name => 'Messi', rank => 4, ), etc.. );


2

A valid use for oft-misunderstood array_multisort() <?php $array = [ 'name' => ["Ronaldo","Ribery","Bale","Messi"], 'rank' => [2,4,1,3] ]; array_multisort( $array['rank'], SORT_DESC, SORT_NUMERIC, $array['name'], SORT_ASC, SORT_STRING ); var_dump($array); array(2) { 'name' => array(4) { [0] => string(6) "Ribery" ...


1

iterate the array like this $guysDeviceId ; $bGuyMayPass = false; foreach($_SESSION["user_group"] as $userGroup ){ if(!isset($userGroup[DevicesAllowed]) || !isset($userGroup[DevicesAllowed][DevicesOnGroup])){ continue; } if(in_array($userGroup[DevicesAllowed][DevicesOnGroup], $guysDeviceId ){ $bGuyMayPass= true; } } if($bGuyMayPass){ ...


1

(Updated as per comment below) I might be completely missing your point, but would not just iterative processing of your array help? $user_groups = array( 0 => array( 'GroupUsersName' => 'XXX', 'NameTypeUser' => 'Admin', 'idUserType' => 3, 'DevicesAllowed' => array( 'DevicesOnGroup' => array( 1, 2, 3 ) ...


1

ES5 has map/reduce methods that you could handle every dataset transforming needs. function parse(str) { var arr = str.split(","); var obj = arr.reduce(function(prev, cur, index) { prev[cur] = index; return prev; }, {}); return obj; } var str = "Rock,Paper,Scissors"; // ... except much bigger. console.log(parse(str)); ...


1

No, i don't think there is any "built-in" way of doing this. But i think the most elegant way to accomplish exactly what you want is the following: result = str.split(',').reduce( function(prev, cur, index) { prev[cur] = String(index); return prev; }, {});


3

Logically what you want is a set. JavaScript is going to have a Set class soon, but currently it's not widely available in browsers. However, given that your keys are strings, you can use an object as a fake set: // populate set var o = {}; o["Rock"] = true; // ...add others // test membership if (o["Rock"] != null) // is in set If you are able to ...


1

Yes, a simple for loop would be the best way to do this: var str ="Rock,Paper,Scissors", arr = str.split(","), obj = {}; for (var i = 0; i < arr.length; i++) obj[arr[i]] = i; The result: console.log(obj); -> Object {Rock: 0, Paper: 1, Scissors: 2} Here our for loop takes up a measly 2 lines of code. There really isn't much need to ...



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