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41

Change the first false by true. I know it seems stupid to have (true || true) but it proves your point. bool result = true || true && false; // --> true result = (true || true) && false; // --> false result = true || (true && false); // --> true


33

Operator precedence is defined in the appropriate standard. The standards for C and C++ are the One True Definition of what exactly C and C++ are. So if you look closely, the details are there. In fact, the details are in the grammar of the language. For example, take a look at the grammar production rule for + and - in C++ (collectively, ...


28

In Ruby, when you call a * b, you're actually calling a method called * on a. Try this, for example: a = 5 => 5 b = 6 => 6 a.*(b) => 30 c = "hello" => "hello" c.*(a) => "hellohellohellohellohello" Thus <String> * <Fixnum> works fine, because the * method on String understands how to handle integers. It responds by concatenating ...


23

From the C# spec - section 7.7.4 Addition operator: String concatenation: string operator +(string x, string y); string operator +(string x, object y); string operator +(object x, string y); The binary + operator performs string concatenation when one or both operands are of type string. If an operand of string concatenation is null, an empty ...


18

I am confusing myself with the idea of operator precedence and evaluation direction. No, you are not. That is frequently confused, yes, but that is not the thing you are confusing because neither precedence nor order of evaluation is relevant to the question of whether the integer is converted to a string, or why it is legal to add an integer to a ...


17

Yes, you can rely on this (not only in C# but in all (that I know) other languages (except PHP … go figure) with a conditional operator) and your use-case is actually a pretty common practice although some people abhor it. The relevant section in ECMA-334 (the C# standard) is 14.13 §3: The conditional operator is right-associative, meaning that ...


17

In the presence of non-strict evaluation, right-associativity is useful. Let's look at a very dumb example: foo :: Int -> Int foo = const 5 . (+3) . (`div` 10) Ok, what happens when this function is evaluated at 0 when . is infixr? foo 0 => (const 5 . ((+3) . (`div` 10))) 0 => (\x -> const 5 (((+3) . (`div` 10)) x)) 0 => const 5 (((+3) . ...


16

The act of typing out the question yielded the answer to me: terms have the highest precedence. That means that the $x in the first chunk of code is evaluated and yields 1, then 5 is evaluated and yields 5, then ($x += 5) is evaluate and yields 6 (with a side-effect of setting $x to 6): $x = $x * 5 * ($x += 5); address of $x = $x * 5 * ($x += 5); #evaluate ...


15

The expressions f and \x -> f x do, for most purposes, mean the same thing. However, the scope of a lambda expression extends as far to the right as possible, i.e. m >>= (\x -> (f x >>= g)). If the types are m :: m a, f :: a -> m b, and g :: b -> m c, then on the left we have (m >>= f) :: m b, and on the right we have (\x -> ...


13

For operators, associativity means that when the same operator appears in a row, then to which direction the evaluation binds to. In the following, let Q be the operator a Q b Q c If Q is left associative, then it evaluates as (a Q b) Q c And if it is right associative, then it evaluates as a Q (b Q c) It's important, since it changes the meaning of ...


13

For any decent compiler the chosen associativity of these operators are pretty much irrelevant, and the outputted code will be the same regardless. Yes, the parse tree is different, but the emitted code doesn't need to be. In all of the languages of the C family that I know of (to which Javascript also belongs), the logical operators are left associative. ...


12

Since overloadable operator, exists, no, it's not the same behavior. a, (b, c) could call different overloads than (a, b), c.


11

The postfix operator a++ will increment a and then return the original value i.e. similar to this: { temp=a; a=a+1; return temp; } and the prefix ++a will return the new value i.e. { a=a+1; return a; } This is irrelevant to the operator precedence. (And associativity governs whether a-b-c equals to (a-b)-c or a-(b-c).)


10

§5.14/1: "The && operator groups left-to-right. [...] Unlike &, && guarantees left-to-right evaluation: the second operand is not evaluated if the first operand is false." As to when or how it matters: I'm not sure it really does for built-in types. It's possible, however, to overload it in a way that would make it matter. For example: ...


10

The precedence of operators in the C Standard is indicated by the syntax. (C99, 6.5p3) "The grouping of operators and operands is indicated by the syntax. 74)" 74) "The syntax specifies the precedence of operators in the evaluation of an expression" C99 Rationale also says "The rules of precedence are encoded into the syntactic rules ...


9

It returns $child. This is because $child is first added to the array $this->children[]. Then, the result of this assignment is returned. Essentially, it is shorthand for: public function add($child){ $this->children[]=$child; return $child; } This type of shortcut works because, in PHP, assignment is "right-associative": ...


9

Whenever I have confusion about stuff like this I first pull out perldoc perlop, and then if I'm still not sure, or want to see how a particular block of code will get executed, I use B::Deparse: perl -MO=Deparse,-p,-q,-sC my $x = 1; $x = $x * 5 * ($x += 5); ^D gives: (my $x = 1); ($x = (($x * 5) * ($x += 5))); - syntax OK So substituting values at ...


9

The first solution which comes to my mind is using QuickCheck. quickCheck $ \(x, y, z) -> f x (f y z) == f (f x y) z quickCheck $ \(x, y) -> f x y == f y x where f is a function we're testing. It won't prove neither associativity nor commutativity; it's simply the simplest way to write a brute force solution you've been thinking about. QuickCheck's ...


9

Operator associativity isn't specified explicitly as “right-associative” or “left-associative”. You deduce it from the grammar. In your example, the multiplicative-expression term refers to itself recursively, and the recursion is on the left-hand side of the operator. That means that a parser encountering a * b * c must parse a * b * c like (a * b) * c, ...


8

It's not Oracle or SQL. It's basic boolean logic. The AND condition is "stronger" (has precedence) than OR, meaning it will be evaluated first: column1 is not null and column1 = 4 OR column1 = 5 Means column1 is not null and column1 = 4 is evaluated first, then OR is applied between this and column1 = 5 Adding parentheses ensures OR is evaluated first ...


8

Can you point to where in the Java Language Specification it says that associativity in right-to-left? It is not, it is left to right (with the exception of multiple assigments - e.g. x = y = 4). See JLS section 15.7.1, helpfully titled "Evaluate Left-Hand Operand First." Hence the answer is correct: --i + ++i First --i is evaluated. This decrements i ...


8

One way to think about precedence and associativity is to imagine that the language only allows statements containing an assignment and one operator, rather than multiple operators. So a statement like: a = f1() * f2() + f3(); would not be allowed, since it has 5 operators: 3 function calls, multiplication, and addition. In this simplified language, you ...


8

I can't believe there are so many wrong (deleted) answers... maybe I should answer this. First of all, precedence != associativity != evaluation order. Now that we have that out of the way: associativity matters in some cases. For a + b + c, it matters when a, b, and c are floating-point numbers instead of integers, because rounding errors will accumulate ...


8

b = (a) + (++a); This has undefined behavior. Quoting the C99 standard (actually the N1256 draft), 6.5p2: Between the previous and next sequence point an object shall have its stored value modified at most once by the evaluation of an expression. Furthermore, the prior value shall be read only to determine the value to be stored. This ...


8

In both cases, you've got the + operator with the string as one of the operands. There are no overloaded user-defined operators involved, so the compiler will use both of those as string concatenation situations. As far as I'm aware, the C# compiler will only not use string concatenation for a scenario of x + y where either x or y is a string expression at ...


7

I think that you're confusing the monadic laws for the structure of a monadic expression. The monadic associativity law states that the expression (m >>= f) >>= g must be equivalent to the expression m >>= (\x -> f x >>= g) for the data type of m to be considered a monad. This does not imply that every monadic expression must be ...


7

It's to mirror the fixity of $. You could make a very good case for both $ and $! having the wrong fixity.


7

Grouping (this is what non-comparison operators do): a + b + c means (a + b) + c Chaining (this is what comparison operators do): a < b < c means (a < b) and (b < c) Grouping left to right (this is the way things are grouped): 5 - 2 - 1 means (5 - 2) - 1 == 2 as opposed to grouping right to left (this would produce a ...


7

Isn't it simple to have just left or right associativity for all the same precedence operators? Yes and it is the case in C. May be you assumed that prefix and postfix have the same precedence which is wrong. Postfix has a higher precedence than prefix! Also there is another curious case to consider as to why certain operators have certain ...



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