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89

According to a recent episode of Radiolab (about "Falling"), a cat reaches terminal velocity by the 9th floor. After that, it relaxes and is less likely to be hurt. There are completely uninjured cats after a fall from above the 30th. The riskiest floors are 5th to 9th.


63

You can easily write a little DP (dynamic programming) for the general case of n floors and m cats. The main formula, a[n][m] = min(max(a[k - 1][m - 1], a[n - k][m]) + 1) : for each k in 1..n, should be self-explanatory: If first cat is thrown from k-th floor and dies, we now have k - 1 floors to check (all below k) and m - 1 cats (a[k - 1][m - 1]). ...


39

There you go. This is probably the most trivial example of a function that runs in O(n!) time (where n is the argument to the function): void nFacRuntimeFunc(int n) { for(int i=0; i<n; i++) { nFacRuntimeFunc(n-1); } }


33

Very informally, the work done depends on your language's operational semantics. Haskell, well, it's lazy, so you pay only constant factors to: push pointers to x on the stack allocate a heap cell for (,) apply (,) to its arguments return a pointer to the heap cell Done. O(1) work, performed when the caller looks at the result of f. Now, you will ...


30

One classic example is the traveling salesman problem through brute-force search. If there are N cities, the brute force method will try each and every permutation of these N cities to find which one is cheapest. Now the number of permutations with N cities is N! making it's complexity factorial (O(N!)).


29

Theorem: Every deterministic algorithm for this problem probes Ω(log2 n) memory locations in the worst case. Proof (completely rewritten in a more formal style): Let k > 0 be an odd integer and let n = k2. We describe an adversary that forces (log2 (k + 1))2 = Ω(log2 n) probes. We call the maximal subsequences of identical elements groups. The adversary's ...


27

If the depth of the stack (recursion) is constant and does not change with respect to the size of the input, then a recursive solution can be O(1) extra space. Some compilers may do tail call optimization (TCO) and remove recursive calls if they are the last statement executed in any given code path through a function. With TCO, there is no call-stack ...


26

extra allowed space is O(1) means that your program can use only a constant amount of space, say C. Going by the definition of big-O, this means that the space that your program needs cannot depend on the size of the input, although C can be made arbitrarily large. So if the recursion depends on the input a (which usually is the case), the space that your ...


19

MSDN Lists these: Dictionary<,> List<> SortedList<,> (edit: wrong link; here's the generic version) SortedDictionary<,> etc. For example: The SortedList(TKey, TValue) generic class is a binary search tree with O(log n) retrieval, where n is the number of elements in the dictionary. In this, it is similar to the ...


16

This page summarises some of the time comlplexities for various collection types with Java, though they should be exactly the same for .NET. I've taken the tables from that page and altered/expanded them for the .NET framework. See also the MSDN pages for SortedDictionary and SortedList, which detail the time complexities required for various operations. ...


15

A sorted array suggests a binary search. We have to redefine equality and comparison. Equality simple means an odd number of elements. We can do comparison by observing the index of the first or last element of the group. The first element will be an even index (0-based) before the odd group, and an odd index after the odd group. We can find the first and ...


13

You should drop any coefficients because the question is really asking "on the order of", which tries to characterize it as linear, exponential, logarithmic, etc... That is, when n is very large, the coefficient is of little importance. This also explains why you drop the +7n, because when n is very large, that term has relatively little significance to ...


13

Given a list of data which you know nothing about, there is no way to find the maximum element without examining each element and thus taking O(n) time because if you don't check it, you might miss it. So no, your algorithm isn't faster than O(n) it is in fact O(n log n) as you are basically just running merge sort. Here is more data on the Selection ...


11

Big-O means <= and big Omega means >=, so a function that is O(1) but not Omega(1) is f(n) = 1/n. For the other way around, f(n) = n works.


11

The only constants you can remove are additive and multiplicative ones. Meaning O(f(n)) = O(f(n) + C) = O(C × f(n)). 22n = (2n)2. This 2 constant cannot be ignored as it is an exponent. Just as O(n) and O(n2) are different complexity classes, so are O(2n) and O(22n). On the other hand, yes, O(n log 4n) = O(n log n). We can use a logarithmic identity ...


11

Here is a table composed by John Jacobsen and taken from this discussion:


10

Look at the middle element of the array. With a couple of appropriate binary searches, you can find the first and its last appearance in the array. E.g., if the middle element is 'a', you need to find i and j as shown below: [* * * * a a a a * * *] ^ ^ | | | | i j Is j - i an even number? You are done! ...


10

The coefficients aren't relevant in Big O notation, so it's just O(n2). As Wikipedia explains: [...] the coefficients become irrelevant if we compare to any other order of expression, such as an expression containing a term n3 or n2.


10

Imagine you're in a tall building with a cat. The cat can survive a fall out of a low story window, but will die if thrown from a high floor. How can you figure out the longest drop that the cat can survive, using the least number of attempts? The best strategy for solving this problem is investigating, using the law of physics, the probability of your ...


10

When we talk about Asymptotic complexities we generally take into account very large n. Now for collision handling in a Hash Table some of the methods are chained hashing & linear probing. In both the cases two things may happen (that will help in answering your question): 1. You may require resizing of the hash table due to it getting full 2. Collisions ...


10

log(x^c) = c * log(x) So, log2(f(n)^c) == c * log2(f(n)) Therefore, f(n)∗log2(f(n)^c) = c * f(n) * log2(f(n)) = O(g(n)∗log2(g(n)))


9

The while loop is O(log m) because you keep dividing m by 3 until it is below or equal to 100. Since 100 is a constant in your case, it can be ignored, yes. The inner loop is O(log n) as you said, because you multiply j by 2 until it exceeds n. Therefore the total complexity is O(log n + log m). or arithmetic operations, doesn't matter on what scale, ...


9

Why this is true can be derived directly from the formal definition. More specifically, f(x) = O(g(n)) if and only if |f(x)| <= M|g(x)| for all x >= x0 for some M and x0. Here you're free to pick M as you wish, so if M = 5 for f(x) = O(n2) to be true, then you can just pick M = 5*100 for f(x) = O(100 n2) to be true. Why this is useful is a bit of a ...


9

Thus (n log n) is "bigger" than ((log n)3). This could be easily generalized to ((log n)k) via induction.


9

This logic is certainly correct, but it is not fast enough to beat O(n) because you check every element. You can do it faster by observing that if A[i]==i, then all elements at j < i are at their proper places. This observation should be sufficient to construct a divide-and-conquer approach that runs in O(log2n): Check the element in the middle If it's ...


8

Everyone reading or writing about complexity of algorithms should know exactly what the Landau Symbols and asymptotic notations are, otherwise they don't really understand what is going on, or simply have an approximate (and often misleading) idea. To simplify (a lot), let f and g be two functions f : N -> N and g : N -> N. We say that f is O(g) if ...


8

See the Orders of common functions section of the Big O Wikipedia article. According to the article, solving the traveling salesman problem via brute-force search and finding the determinant with expansion by minors are both O(n!).


8

It is important to distinguish between the case and the bound. Best, average, and worst are common cases of interest when analyzing algorithms. Upper (O, o) and lower (Omega, omega), along with Theta, are common bounds on functions. When we say "Algorithm X's worst-case time complexity is O(n)", we're saying that the function which represents Algorithm ...


8

If the depth of your recursion grows depending on the size of your input (which it usually does), then yes: You would be using an unbounded amount of stack memory. The requirement was to solve the problem with a fixed amount of memory.



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