About

This covers the asynchronous programming model supported by various programming languages, using the async and await keywords.

Several programming languages support an asynchronous programming model using co-routines, with the async and await keywords.

Support for the model was added to C# and VB in VS2012, and Python in 3.5. A proposal for the feature in ECMAScript has been accepted into stage 1 for ECMASCript 7. Dart 1.9 also adds support for the model.

C# and Visual Studio

Asynchronous programming with async and await was introduced with C# 5.0 in Visual Studio 2012. The run-time support for this language concept is a part of .NET 4.5 / Windows Phone 8 / Windows 8.x Store Runtime.

It's also possible to use async/await and target .NET 4.0 / Windows Phone 7.1 / Silverlight 4 / MonoTouch / MonoDroid / Portable Class Libraries, with Visual Studio 2012+ and Microsoft.Bcl.Async NuGet package, which is licensed for production code.

Async CTP add-on for VS2010 SP1 is also available, but it is not suitable for production development.

Python

Similar syntax was introduced to Python 3.5 (see PEP 492 - Coroutines with async and await syntax.

Previously, it was possible to write co-routines using generators; with the introduction of await and async co-routines were lifted to a native language feature.

Ecmascript

The introduction of Promises and Generators in ECMAScript presents an opportunity to dramatically improve the language-level model for writing asynchronous code in ECMAScript.

A similar proposal was made with Defered Functions during ES6 discussions. The proposal here supports the same use cases, using similar or the same syntax, but directly building upon generators and promises instead of defining custom mechanisms.

Development of this proposal is happening at https://github.com/tc39/ecmascript-asyncawait. Please file issues there. Non-trivial contributions are limited to TC39 members but pull requests for minor issues are welcome and encouraged!

Status of this proposal

This proposal was accepted into stage 1 ("Proposal") of the ECMASCript 7 spec process in January 2014 (discussion).

Examples

Take the following example, first written using Promises. This code chains a set of animations on an element, stopping when there is an exception in an animation, and returning the value produced by the final succesfully executed animation.

function chainAnimationsPromise(elem, animations) {
    var ret = null;
    var p = currentPromise;
    for(var anim in animations) {
        p = p.then(function(val) {
            ret = val;
            return anim(elem);
        })
    }
    return p.catch(function(e) {
        /* ignore and keep going */
    }).then(function() {
        return ret;
    });
}

Already with promises, the code is much improved from a straight callback style, where this sort of looping and exception handling is challenging.

Task.js and similar libraries offer a way to use generators to further simplify the code maintaining the same meaning:

function chainAnimationsGenerator(elem, animations) {
    return spawn(function*() {
        var ret = null;
        try {
            for(var anim of animations) {
                ret = yield anim(elem);
            }
        } catch(e) { /* ignore and keep going */ }
        return ret;
    });
}

This is a marked improvement. All of the promise boilerplate above and beyond the semantic content of the code is removed, and the body of the inner function represents user intent. However, there is an outer layer of boilerplate to wrap the code in an additional generator function and pass it to a library to convert to a promise. This layer needs to be repeated in every function that uses this mechanism to produce a promise. This is so common in typical async Javascript code, that there is value in removing the need for the remaining boilerplate.

With async functions, all the remaining boiler plate is removed, leaving only the semantically meaningful code in the program text:

async function chainAnimationsAsync(elem, animations) {
    var ret = null;
    try {
        for(var anim of animations) {
            ret = await anim(elem);
        }
    } catch(e) { /* ignore and keep going */ }
    return ret;
}

This is morally similar to generators, which are a function form that produces a Generator object. This new async function form produces a Promise object.

Trivia

Asynchrony doesn't assume multithreading, async or await keywords do not magically create any threads.

Resources:

C

Ecmascript

Related:

- Task Parallel Library

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