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19

There are lots of factors involved in this one. I will try to summarize my findings as best as possible (aware of the fact that there is contention regarding the usefulness of reactor and proactor IO handling implementations). Is proactor based IO handling possible in Java in such a way that it is advantageous to use for specific scenarios. Java ...


13

Since you see only a 'Thrown' checkbox in the exception settings, my suspicion is that you have '.Net Framework Source Stepping' enabled in your debug settings. If you enable 'Just My Code' (which disables '.Net Framework Source Stepping'), you should get 'User-Unhandled' and 'Thrown' checkboxes in your exception settings dialog and you will also catch the ...


13

This is a known bug in CLR version 4. The feedback article is here. A possible workaround is to change the framework target to version 3.5. I'll just quote the relevant portion of the feedback response: We have investigated the issue and determined there is a bug in CLR v4.0 which causes this. The process does throw the exception (you can catch it ...


12

One thread per connection is bad design (not scalable, overly complex) but unfortunately way too common. A socket server works more or less like this: A listening socket is setup to accept connections, and added to a socketset The socket set is checked for events If the listening socket has pending connections, new sockets are created by accepting the ...


12

I just had the same problem. I don't see a way, using ReceiveFrom or its async variants, to retrieve the destination address of a received packet. However...If you use ReceiveMessageFrom or its variants, you'll get an IPPacketInformation (by reference for ReceiveMessageFrom and EndReceiveMessageFrom, or as a property of the SocketAsyncEventArgs passed to ...


11

FIOASYNC toggles the O_ASYNC flag (which is usually set in open(2) or fcntl(2)) for a file descriptor, which will ask the kernel to send SIGIO or SIGPOLL to the process when the file descriptor is ready for IO. O_ASYNC is not used often: it is extremely difficult to properly handle IO in signal handlers; they are best left as tiny as possible because ...


10

Well, gevent is not "mostly" written in Cython, though some critical sections are. Cython makes a huge difference. Processor optimizations work much better with compiled code. Branch prediction, for example, falls apart in VM-based systems because the indirection of the branching at a VM execution level is opaque to it. The cache footprint is tighter. ...


8

Maybe there was something wrong with the spelling. (So this happened to me and I was searching for hours until I've seen the small difference) GCDAsyncSocket renamed all delegate callbacks from onSocket to socket to match Apples naming style. In your example above you have mentioned - (void)onSocket:(GCDAsyncSocket *)sock didReadData:(NSData *)data ...


7

I would check you really need to worry about blocking writes. A read blocks where there is no data to read. This can be most of the time. However, a write blocks when the buffers are full, this happens very rarely and often indiciates a slow connection or a failed consumer. If you want non-blocking IO, do it for the reads, and therefor for the writes as ...


7

Ok, the answers: No, I cannot rely on the operation_aborted error only. Of course, it's not a bug in Asio, just a lack of experience on my side. There is a little bit of official documentation. It's for timers, not sockets, however the same principles apply: If the timer has already expired when cancel() is called, then the handlers for asynchronous ...


6

We figured it out. It wasn't the iPhone or Objective-C at all. The conversion error was happening on the node.js server. We forgot to put quotes around the string values of the JSON object, and so the JSON.stringify() JavaScript function was converting the strings as shown above... except we were doing something like: {"content":Hi}. When we changed it to: ...


6

Per the header file: // Once one of the accept or connect methods are called, the AsyncSocket instance is locked in // and the other accept/connect methods can't be called without disconnecting the socket first. // If the attempt fails or times out, these methods either return NO or // call "onSocket:willDisconnectWithError:" and "onSockedDidDisconnect:". ...


6

It's just very unreliable and I have to hope that it sends it all in one read. The key to successful programming with TCP is that there is no concept of a TCP "packet" or "block" of data at the application level. The application only sees a stream of bytes, with no boundaries. When you call write() on the sending end with some data, the TCP layer may ...


6

I'm new with Objective C (so bear with my ignorance of it), but I have been able to get AsyncUdpSocketDelegate to receive, for the most part. A few things to try/confirm: Make sure the self class that you are initializing as your socket delegate is the class that you're expecting the callbacks on. Make sure your class adopts the AsyncUdpSocketDelegate ...


6

I know this is an old question with an already accepted answer, but to clarify for people who find this thread looking for something, the reason the delegate methods didn't get called is because the GCDAsynchSocket start with socket: instead of onsocket: ie: - (void)onSocket:(AsyncSocket *)sock didWriteDataWithTag:(long)tag becomes: - (void) ...


6

It depends on the protocol that the socket is using. See socket_create for the possible types of sockets. The main types are UDP and TCP: udp The User Datagram Protocol is a connectionless, unreliable, protocol with fixed record lengths. Due to these aspects, UDP requires a minimum amount of protocol overhead. tcp The Transmission Control Protocol ...


6

Make sure the socket is properly set up for multicast. Here's what I'm doing in my multicast project: - (void)setupSocket { udpSocket = [[GCDAsyncUdpSocket alloc] initWithDelegate:self delegateQueue:dispatch_get_main_queue()]; NSError *error = nil; if (![udpSocket bindToPort:5555 error:&error]) { NSLog(@"Error binding to port: ...


6

From man 7 tcp: int value; error = ioctl(sock, FIONREAD, &value); Or alternatively SIOCINQ, which is a synonym of FIONREAD. Anyway, I'd recommend just to use recv in non-blocking mode in a loop until it returns EWOULDBLOCK. UPDATE: From your comments below I think that this is not the appropriate solution for your problem. Imagine that your header ...


6

The low application throughput itself cannot explain the thread creation and destruction. The socket receives 20 messages per seconds, which is more than enough to keep a thread alive (the waiting threads are being destroyed after spending 10 seconds idle). This problem is related to the thread pool thread injection, i.e. the threads creation and ...


5

The SCNetworkReachability API only checks whether the address can be routed to. Quoting the documentation: "Reachability" reflects whether a data packet, sent by an application into the network stack, can leave the local computer. Note that reachability does not guarantee that the data packet will actually be received by the host. This has ...


5

You can’t timeout or cancel asynchronous Socket operations. All you can do is start your own Timer which closes the Socket—the callback will then be immediately called and the EndX function will come back with an ObjectDisposedException if you call it. Here's an example: using System; using System.Threading; using System.Net.Sockets; class AsyncClass { ...


5

Building a well working proxy is no simple task as you will have to understand and handle HTTP etc. in both directions... I would recommend to either use an existing library for that OR some configurable proxy... http://www.mentalis.org/soft/projects/proxy/ (with source) http://sourceforge.net/p/portfusion/home/PortFusion/ (with source) ...


5

Try wrapping your file access code with runOnUIThread(new Runnable{/*code goes here*/}())


5

It sounds like you are using TCP. This is expected behavior of TCP, and you need to upgrade your parser to support it. You cannot safely assume that a chunk of data from the read end will include only one command, and additionally you cannot assume that you will get the entirety of a command in a single read.


5

There's a handful of ways you can accomplish this. Here are some: Infrastructure: Establish a SSL/TLS-enabled VPN with your client. Use the new private network to connect to your client's network. Pro: Little to no change in code, depending on your current implementation. Con: Depending on your client's infrastructure (and yours!), it may not be possible. ...


4

A friend of a friend figured it out for me! We were not able to get GCDAsyncSocket to work properly (connect and write, but not read). AsyncSocket however functions in all 3 respects, and all the delegates work properly. #import "AsyncSocket.h" #import "tcp_clientViewController.h" @implementation tcp_clientViewController @synthesize socket; ...


4

GCHandles pinning your buffers and some other unmanaged resources are released by the completion port callback. The unmanaged OVERLAPPED structure will hang around until the IAsyncResult gets finalized. This may be tolerable if the network load in your application is not large, but may become a problem if your application handles many connections per second, ...


4

Sounds like you need one thread writing to the socket synchronously and a bunch of threads writing to a queue for that thread to process. You can use a blocking collection (BlockingCollection<T>) to do the hard work: // somewhere there is a queue: BlockingCollection<byte[]> queue = new BlockingCollection<byte[]>(); // in socket-writing ...


4

While similar to Porges answer it differs a bit in implementation. First, I usually don't queue the bytes to send, but objects and seralize them in the sending thread but I guess that's a matter of taste. But the bigger difference is in the use of ConcurrentQueues (in addition to the BlockingCollection). So I'd end up with code similar to ...


4

You get the error because the socket is non-blocking. Either you do a busy loop while you get that error (check errno when accept returns -1 for either EWOULDBLOCK or EAGAIN). The other and recommended solution is to use select to see when the socket is readable, then you can call accept. Edit: How to do it with select You need to have an event-loop at a ...



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