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8

No. If you want atomic operations, you can use the sync/atomic package. If you mean "would 8bit operations be atomic even if I ignore the Go memory model?", then the answer is still, it depends probably not. If the hardware guarantees atomicity of read/write operations, then it might be atomic. But that still doesn't guarantee cache coherence, or compiler ...


8

As duskwuff pointed out, you need a lock prefix. The reason why is that: addl $9,_x(%rip) is actually three "micro operations" from the standpoint of the memory system [herein %eax just for illustration--never really used]: mov _x(%rip),%eax addl $9,%eax mov %eax,_x(%rip) Here's a valid sequence of events. This is guaranteed by the lock ...


6

There's no guarantee that the access on native types are on any platform atomic. This is why there is sync/atomic. See also the advice in the memory model documentation. Example for generic way of atomically setting a value (Play) var ax atomic.Value // may be globally accessible x := uint8(5) // set atomically ax.Store(x) x = ax.Load().(uint8) ...


5

Whether make_pair() is or isn't atomic is irrelevant. If I have another thread accessing the value of currentData, is there any potential that currentData's value will be incomplete when it's accessed? The only question here is whether std::pair's assignment operator is atomic, since that's what determines whether the assignment operation is thread-...


4

Atomicity Documentation To summarize, @transaction.atomic will execute a transaction on the database if your view produces a response without errors. Because you're catching the exception yourself, it appears to Django that your view executed just fine. If you catch the exception, you need to handle it yourself: Controlling Transactions If you need to ...


4

All variables are non-atomic. When a property is declared atomic, the synthesized code for the setter and getter includes extra code to make the variable's access atomic. With plain old variables, there is no auto synthesis of any code to make them atomic. If you need a variable to be atomic, you need to add your own code to make its access atomic. Using @...


4

Yes, you are concerned unnecessarily of the performance impacts of Interlocked because Interlocked doesn't just perform an atomic action on values, it also ensures that the value is visible to all threads (sequential consistency). Let me explain. On some architectures (some 64-bit architectures included) the value written to a memory location may be cached ...


4

Are we guaranteed that, when kernel execution has concluded, the results of one of these writes will be present in that location, rather than some junk? For CUDA GPUs, and I'm pretty sure for NVIDIA GPUs with OpenCL, the answer is yes. Most of my terminology below will have CUDA in view. If you require an exhaustive answer for both CUDA and OpenCL, let ...


3

No. There is a tiny window between the processor reading the old value of _x and writing the new value back; if another CPU writes to _x at that exact moment, that value will be overwritten. Adding the LOCK prefix to the instruction will make the operation atomic.


3

C# does not guarantee that reads and writes of nullable variables are atomic. The types for which operations are guaranteed to be atomic are defined in section 5.5 of the specification (Atomicity of variable references): Reads and writes of the following data types are atomic: bool, char, byte, sbyte, short, ushort, uint, int, float, and reference types. ...


3

Yes, it's atomic if it's under 64MB, unless you parallelize as parallelizing will chunk the data. Even for data greater than 64MB with block blobs, there's a two step commit process so if upload fails in the middle you're still in relatively good shape. If we upload chunks of data in 4MB blocks, we also have to commit these blocks. So, if uploading fails we ...


3

You have an extra layer of parentheses: ((println "OK")). The result of (println "OK") is a nil, so the extra pair of parenthesis looks like a function call on nil: (nil). In Java the equivlant code would be null(), which doesn't make any sense. Remember that in Clojure, parentheses mean "function call". UPDATE 2015-9-17: If function syntax is: (...


3

You are asking about isolation, not really atomicity. Aerospike executes all transactions in serialised fashion per key. I.e, one one write transaction can be active on a key at any given point in time. Everyone else is made to wait. Execution order is not necessarily FIFO but serialised. Same is the case with udf too.


3

You're basing your assumption (that using ConcurrentHashMap as intended will be too slow for you) on a misinterpretation of the Javadoc. The Javadoc doesn't state that the whole map will be locked. It also doesn't state that each computeIfAbsent() operation performs pessimistic locking. What could actually be locked is a bin (a.k.a. bucket) which ...


3

It won't throw any exception, but it could return incorrect results: the time and the count are incremented separately. They're not incremented both at once, in a single atomic operation the time and the count are read separately, instead of being read both at once in a single atomic operation. So, you could very well read a time of 100 in a thread, then ...


3

The key point is the adverb locally in the quoted sentence "It does not execute until all prior instructions have completed locally". I was unable to find a clear definition of "complete locally" the whole set of Intel manual, my speculation is explained below. In order to be completed locally an instruction must have it output computed and available to ...


3

__asm__ volatile("" ::: "memory") is not even a complete compiler barrier; it only forces ordering of loads/stores to objects whose addresses are potentially accessible to the asm block, which would not include local variables for which the compiler can track that the address does not leak. For example, memset(password, 0, len); followed by __asm__ volatile("...


2

As the answer you linked explains, atomicity and visibility are completely different concepts. Atomicity of ints insures that if a thread changes an int value from 5 to -7, other threads may observe either 5 or -7 but never anything else. Visibility deals with when the other threads are guaranteed to see that the variable changed from 5 to -7. The ...


2

You can't do all of them in one query. However, you are on the right track. You should be using .bulk_create() for batch insertion and do one more lookup for getting them back as objects in order to add into foos. If you are too concerned that the latter query will perform slowly, you can set unique=True or, db_index=True for improving performance. You ...


2

You are using processes to run f, but you are trying to use threading semaphores for synchronization. You are mixing incompatible multi-tasking models here. Processes, as you are using in your program, runs in different memory space and have independent program counter, meaning you cannot synchronize them like they are running in a single program. Threads ...


2

You can use os.open with os.O_CREAT | os.O_EXCL flags which will fail if the file exists, they are according to the docs available on Unix and Windows but I am not sure if atomic file creation exists on windows or not: os.open("filename", os.O_CREAT | os.O_EXCL) From the linux open man page: O_EXCL If O_CREAT and O_EXCL are set, open() shall fail if ...


2

Ctrl+C doesn't necessarily kill the application - you can use the Console.CancelKeyPress event to handle the shutdown properly. As for when the user clicks the close button, you're out of luck - that actually does brutally kill the process. Your application should have some support for a graceful shutdown. For example, you could have a cancellation token ...


2

Don't wrap the println calls in two sets of parentheses. Use only one pair. What's in parentheses is usually read as a function or macro call. Clojure evaluates the println in the inner parens. Then println returns nil, and Clojure tries to use that as a function because of the outer parens. nil is Java's null, which causes the exception.


2

However, if an exception happens in a function decorated with transaction.atomic, then you don't have anything to do, it'll rollback automatically to the savepoint created by the decorator before running the your function, as documented: atomic allows us to create a block of code within which the atomicity on the database is guaranteed. If the block of ...


2

The answer is very simple. The nature of atomic functions is that they modify (increment in this case) the actual value at the time of execution which might be different from the value as your code knew it. example: x = 5; // x is global y = atomically_increment(x); // what is y? Now, if x happened to be changed from 5 to 6 right before increment ...


2

To handle this, you should make your write APIs idempotent i.e. If the same operation is executed multiple times, the result should be same as the operation was done only once. To achieve this in your current example, you need to be able to identify a contact uniquely based on some parameter, say emailAddress. So, if the createContact is called again with ...


2

You want pthread_sigmask, the multithread version of sigprocmask Here's some sample pseudo code: int main(void) { sigset_t omask; sigset_t nmask; // add as many signals as you want to the mask ... sigemptyset(&nmask); sigaddset(&nmask,SIGINT); // [temporarily] block signals pthread_sigmask(SIG_BLOCK,&nmask,&...


2

You need two locks. The one used inside your func(), and one to protect the process's signal mask. You have to make masking and unmasking the signal atomic also: static pthread_mutex_t mask_mutex = PTHREAD_MUTEX_INITIALIZER; sigset_t old_set; sigset_t new_set; sigemptyset( &new_set ); sigaddset( &new_set, SIGINT ); pthread_mutex_lock( &...


1

According to Nullable(T): Any public static members of this type are thread safe. Any instance members are not guaranteed to be thread safe.


1

The line __sync_fetch_and_add(&(__var__), 0) actually does something slightly different than just fetch the variable. It takes ownership of the cache line. I'm not sure if that's intended but that is what it does. So, changing it will change the semantics of the program. The x86-64 architecture is strongly ordered though, so you generally don't need ...



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